Temple University, Japan Campus

Basic Information

Founded 1982
https://www.tuj.ac.jp

Bruce Stronach, Ph.D.
Dean

1-14-29 Taishido, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 154-0004, Japan
+81-3-5441-9800 (from overseas) / 03-5441-9800 (in Japan)

Academic Affairs (Undergraduate)

George Miller, M.J., M.L.A.
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
gwm3@temple.edu

Jonathan Wu, M.S.
Assistant Dean for Academic Programs
jonwu@tuj.temple.edu

Yoko Namima
Registrar, Japan Campus
tujregistrar@tuj.temple.edu

Norihisa Shimada, M.H.Ed.A.
Director, Academic Advising
aac@tuj.temple.edu

Undergraduate faculty information is available on the TUJ web site.

Campus Overview

Oldest and largest foreign university in Japan

Temple University, Japan Campus (TUJ) is the oldest and largest foreign university in Japan. Founded in 1982, TUJ has developed into a nationally recognized institution offering an extensive range of educational programs. In addition to its core undergraduate program, TUJ offers graduate programs in lawbusiness, and education; an English-language preparation programcontinuing education courses; and corporate education classes.

4,700 learners and counting...

Including the participants in the Corporate Education programs and English training programs for educational organizations, TUJ is a home for around 4,700 learners. TUJ takes pride in its top-quality, English-language education and in providing a unique opportunity for students to obtain American undergraduate and graduate degrees without leaving Japan.

International student body

One of TUJ's greatest assets is its student body. Students come from approximately 60 countries around the world, including Japan, the United States, East and Southeast Asia, Russia, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and Europe. Its diverse student body helps make TUJ a rich, dynamic, and stimulating institution.

Recognized as a Foreign University, Japan Campus

TUJ is the first educational institution in Japan to be officially recognized as a Foreign University, Japan Campus by Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. This status allows TUJ to sponsor student visas, enabling international students to study at the university on either a short-term basis (one or two semesters) or a long-term basis (such as to complete a full four-year program).

Superb faculty and small classes

TUJ's superb faculty works closely with students to help them achieve their academic objectives. We organize small classes to facilitate lively discussions and to allow professors to give special attention to students. Moreover, TUJ offers the Temple University brand of education, providing the same course content as that of Temple's main campus and teaching all but its language courses in English. Studying at TUJ offers the same quality education as at Temple University in the United States.

For more information about TUJ, go to the TUJ web site.

Academic Programs (Undergraduate)

TUJ offers the following programs, which are not offered at any other Temple campus:

TUJ also offers the following programs:

Academic Advising Center

Norihisa Shimada, M.H.Ed.A., Director

TUJ's Academic Advising Center works with all undergraduate students in any major at any level. See "Advising" section for more details.

Internship Program (Career Development Office)

Kentaro Sawa, M.A., Director

The internship program is one of the distinctive features of a TUJ education. Students find it useful to not only gain valuable work experience, but also to build their future career plan. In fact, many students choose to find the same kind of job as they undertake during their internship. 

Credit internship is a valuable way to gain practical work experience, often in a student's field of interest, while earning academic credits. Since credit internship is treated as an academic course, you will need to register with the Academic Advising Center. Students usually work from 10 to 20 hours per week on site under managerial supervision.

Not only TUJ students but also qualified Main Campus students are welcome to apply for the Internship Program through Study Abroad. Main Campus students who are interested in applying for TUJ's Internship Program should contact the Education Abroad and Overseas Campuses, 200 Tuttleman Learning Center.

More details about the Internship Program at TUJ can be found at the TUJ Career Development Office web site.

Office of Student Services

Nicole Despres, Director

The Office of Student Services (OSS) supports TUJ's diverse student population as they become members of the university community. In addition to providing assistance with the visa application process and coordinating Financial Aid/GI Bill-related matters and housing, the OSS provides orientations to help students adapt to the academic and social life at TUJ. The OSS also works with the Student Government and other student organizations to encourage social interaction among students with different backgrounds by creating events and activities that appeal to all TUJ students.

Teaching & Learning Center

Andrew Merzenich, M.A., Director

The Teaching & Learning Center (TLC) at TUJ offers free tutoring in a variety of subjects, resources for self-access independent study, and support for faculty. 

Free tutoring is available from Monday through Friday. Students in any TUJ program may come to the TLC (room Azabu 209) and sign up for appointments, or wait for the next available tutor. Every semester, tutoring generally begins sometime during the second week of classes, and the last day of undergraduate classes is the last day of TLC tutoring.

Disability Resources & Services (DRS)

May Watabe, M.Ed., Disability Resources and Services Coordinator

Temple University is committed to inclusion and diversity. We want to ensure all students have the support they need to learn. The Disability Resources and Services (DRS) team ensures that students with particular educational needs can access the full university experience. For more details, see the TUJ DRS web site

Registrar's Office

Yoko Namima, Registrar, Japan Campus

The TUJ Registrar's Office (RO) is responsible for academic record maintenance (e.g. manual registration input, certified document issuance, etc.) in order to assist students in achieving their academic goals.

Not only do we handle various registration-related data input and release for TUJ staff members and students, TUJ RO is also committed to collaborating with the Main Campus Office of the University Registrar to share mutual issues and make necessary changes in our procedures.

Research Opportunities for Students & Faculty

Mariko Nagai, M.A., Director

As the only fully accredited American university in Tokyo, TUJ is uniquely positioned and committed to supporting research opportunities for both students and faculty, especially in Teaching English as a Second Language, Law, the Humanities, Art, Business Studies, Communications Studies, and the Social Sciences. For more details, see the Research web site.

Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies (ICAS)

Robert Dujarric, M.B.A., Director

ICAS provides lectures, seminars and discussions of issues related to Japanese politics, society and economics. Participants include a wide range of individuals from both the foreign and Japanese business, government and academic communities. ICAS also publishes articles on Asian and US affairs, hosts adjunct and visiting fellows, and coordinates undergraduate and graduate student internships. Its events and publications are in English. Details about ICAS seminars, events and publications are available at the ICAS web site

Academic Advising

Academic Advising Center, Temple University, Japan Campus (TUJ)
1st Floor, TUJ Building
+81-3-5441-9862 (from overseas) / 03-5441-9862 (in Japan)
aac@tuj.temple.edu

www.tuj.ac.jp/ug/academics/advising-and-support/academic-advising/index.html

Norihisa Shimada, M.H.Ed.A.
Director

Danielle Vokal, M.S., M.A.
Assistant Director

Academic Advising is a series of supportive activities provided for students to accomplish their academic and career goals through assistance such as:

  • choosing an appropriate major based on their interests
  • selecting appropriate courses for their program of study
  • monitoring their academic progress
  • informing about the University's deadlines, policies, and regulations
  • assisting students on exploring academic options and opportunities

Please also see full mission statement

The Academic Advising Center (AAC) works with all undergraduate students as a primary support unit. Major Coordinators are also available to assist students in course selection for the major and minor requirements based on their academic interest and needs.

Advising by Professional Advisors

Undergraduate students in all majors at any level can get assistance from the Academic Advising Center (AAC, located on the 1st floor of Azabu Hall) staffed with full-time professional academic advisors. Students will be ensured by the AAC advisors to satisfy all of the University's graduation requirement areas, such as General Education, major, and college requirements. Advising is available on appointment basis throughout the semester with the exception of certain designated periods in which advising is limited, such as Graduation Review and Clearance or New Student Orientation.

Advising Appointments

Appointments are typically available between 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. on Monday through Friday. In order to make an appointment, students simply can stop by the AAC or submit a request through the online form. Each advising slot typically lasts for 30 minutes.

Due to high demand for advising appointments, it is critical for students to arrive on time. Please be aware that students who are more than 10 minutes late to their appointment will have to reschedule due to time constraints.

Advising by the AAC is also available on the same-day sign-up basis during the first two weeks of each semester. Each advising slot will last for 30 minutes. Students who wish to book a slot may do so only by stopping at the AAC. The sign-up sheet becomes available at 9:00 a.m. every day during the aforementioned period.

Major Coordinators

While the AAC works as the primary unit for advising to TUJ undergraduate students, Major Coordinators are also available for students to discuss their course selection particularly in major and minor requirements. Students should remember that Major Coordinators are specifically responsible for the respective major and minor requirements only, and therefore, General Education and other collegial requirements are typically not covered by them. Students who seek assistance in comprehensive academic advising to cover all degree requirements should meet with a professional academic advisor from the AAC even after they discuss course selection in their major requirements with the Major Coordinator.

Double-major students and students with minors should also meet with a professional advisor from the AAC on a regular basis since there will be a policy regarding course sharing.

Through contact with the Major Coordinators, students gain an in-depth appreciation of a specific discipline and discover opportunities associated with their field of interest. Some TUJ students choose to continue their studies by attending Masters or Doctorate Graduate programs of their choice. While each graduate program has their own specific admissions requirements, it is recommended that students meet with their Major Coordinator for further information and suggestions. Students should begin planning as soon as their sophomore/junior year.

Change of Program (CoP) between TUJ and Main Campus

The AAC serves as an academic liaison with relevant advising and other academic units at Main Campus, and assists students transfer between two campuses. Students who are interested in studying at Main Campus should contact the AAC at least two semesters earlier before they transfer to Main Campus.

Academic Partnership with Japanese Universities

TUJ currently has academic partnerships with the following institutions in Tokyo. TUJ students can attend these institutions and earn credits without extra costs. Contact the AAC for more details.

Meiji University, School of Arts and Letters

Musashi University

Showa Women's University

Toyo University, Faculty of Global and Regional Studies & Faculty of International Tourism Management

Main Campus Students

Main Campus students who are interested in attending TUJ should first discuss their options with the Education Abroad and Overseas Campuses, 200 Tuttleman Learning Center. 

Academic Policies

As one of the campuses run by Temple University, TUJ also follows the University's Academic Policies. See Academic Policies and the TUJ web site

Academic Calendar

Available on TUJ web site: Academic Calendar

Course Schedule

Available on TUJ web site: Course Schedules

Art (Japan Campus) Courses

ARTU 1101. Painting for Non-Majors. 3 Credit Hours.

This Non-Major course in painting focuses on oil painting techniques, conceptual development, and the use of elements of design for creative expression. Note: See your advisor for information on the GenEd Arts waiver.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 1201. 3-D Design. 3 Credit Hours.

A foundation course in 3-D design focusing on the principles, elements, and technical processes for visual understanding and creative expression. Note: See your advisor for information on the GenEd Arts waiver.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 1401. Drawing I. 3 Credit Hours.

A foundation course in drawing focusing on drawing techniques, conceptual development, and the use of elements of design for creative expression. Note: See your advisor for information on the GenEd Arts waiver.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 1402. Drawing II. 3 Credit Hours.

A foundation course in drawing focusing on drawing techniques, conceptual development, and the use of elements of design for creative expression.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 1401|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 1501. 2D Design. 3 Credit Hours.

A foundation course in design focusing on the principles, elements, and technical processes for visual understanding and creative expression. Note: See your advisor for information on the GenEd Arts waiver.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2001. Philadelphia Sketchbook. 3 Credit Hours.

This non-majors drawing course combines studio instruction in basic drawing skills as well as on-site drawing in Philadelphia's many historical sites and museums. Emphasis will be on improving observational skills and drawing techniques. Students will be encouraged to develop their own unique vision. This course has no prerequisites. Daily outings will be required to various significant Philadelphia sites.

Level Registration Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2102. Painting. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces second-year students to painting techniques and conceptual framework while developing the procedural logic necessary to articulate the figure and still life in oil and acrylic media. The student is encouraged to explore invented as well as analytical form.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 1401|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 1402|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 2111. Aqueous Media. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to color design theory and practice.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2121. Introduction to Landscape Painting. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the rich traditions of painting outdoors. Focus will be on water-based medium. NOTE: Summer only. Ambler Campus only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2122. Advanced Landscape Painting. 3 Credit Hours.

For students with some painting and drawing background, the course emphasizes painting outdoors on the Ambler Campus. NOTE: Summer only. Ambler campus only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2121|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2202. Intermediate 3-D. 3 Credit Hours.

Three-dimensional design theory and practice through construction techniques in wood and other materials. Emphasis on conceptual growth. NOTE: Main Campus only. Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "3-D Structures."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 1201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2301. Relief Printmaking. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to basic relief printmaking, black/white and color, in wood, linoleum, metal, and various other materials. NOTE: Main Campus only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2302. Intermediate Printmaking: Relief. 3 Credit Hours.

Intermediate level studies in relief processes including photographic and digital printmaking, with emphasis on conceptual growth and individual instruction. NOTE: Main Campus only. Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Relief Printmaking II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2311. Lithography. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to drawing, painting, photographic, and digital printmaking techniques, processes, and image development, black/white and color on limestone. NOTE: Main Campus only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 1401|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ARTU 1496|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ARTU 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2312. Intermediate Printmaking: Lithography. 3 Credit Hours.

Intermediate level studies in lithographic, photographic, and digital printmaking techniques. Reversals, transfers, master image plans, registration procedures and color printing will be demonstrated. Emphasis is on conceptual growth and individual instruction. NOTE: Main Campus only. Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Lithography II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2311|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2331. Intaglio Printmaking. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces a broad range of intaglio plate making and printing processes including etching, drypoint, collagraphs, and photogravure. Additional topics include the care and use of tools and materials, print portfolio presentation, and a historical survey of printmaking.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2341. Screenprinting. 3 Credit Hours.

This course engages students in historic and contemporary approaches to water-based screenprinting concepts and technologies, while encouraging a multi-disciplinary approach to fine art print production. Students will begin with direct cut-paper and hand-painted stencils and move into more complex hand-drawn and digitally manipulated photographic techniques. There will be an emphasis on multi-colored, multi-layered prints as well as the print as image, book, poster, installation, and sculpture. Community and group-based activities will be an integral part of the course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2351. Artist Books, Zines and Independent Publishing. 3 Credit Hours.

Throughout the semester, you will learn the basics of bookbinding, DIY independent publishing, and limited printmaking processes. This will include, but is not limited to: basic book binding terminology, tools, and structures; basic printmaking techniques, covering hand printing techniques and alternative printmaking processes; development and dissemination of work completed in class; and working knowledge of contemporary practices and working artists in the Book Arts and Zine fields.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2400. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

In this studio art course, approaches to making and understanding images in various media will be addressed.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

ARTU 2402. Intermediate Drawing. 3 Credit Hours.

Figurative painting in pastel coupled with basic drawing approaches and techniques. A second level drawing course emphasizing more advanced drawing strategies and the use of chalk pastels. The model is used, although not exclusively. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Drawing II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 1401|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2601. Computer Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the computer as an artist's tool. Emphasis is on developing personal imagery and exploring the ways that the computer can serve as a vehicle for artistic expression. Students should have some previous studio art experience before taking this class. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Introduction to Computer Imaging."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2602. Intermediate Computer Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course serves to deepen students' engagement with the computer as a tool for fine arts. Students explore image making in relation to contemporary practices and work with alternative methods of using the computer as a medium.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2601|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2605. Internet Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

This class explores the web as a tool for artistic expression. Students learn web design within the context of an exploration of the uses of the internet as an art medium. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Introduction to Internet Imaging."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2601|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ARTU 2811|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2801. Art Photography: Darkroom. 3 Credit Hours.

The student is expected to master the basic photographic skills quickly through the use of lecture/demonstration, critiques and independent lab and field work. The course then concentrates on the use of photography as a fine art medium. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Basic Darkroom Photography B/W I."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2802. Intermediate Art Photography: Darkroom. 3 Credit Hours.

An intermediate level class on the use of photography as a fine art medium with emphasis on archival printing on fiber-based paper, sepia and selenium toning, and the development of a personal aesthetic supported by the use of sophisticated shooting and printing techniques. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Basic Darkroom Photography B/W II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2801|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2811. Art Photography: Digital. 3 Credit Hours.

The basic principles of digital photography, including shooting with a digital camera, manipulating images within the computer, and printing to inkjet printers are taught. The course focuses on black & white photo, including duotones. Emphasis is placed on technical expertise, creative development, and an understanding of the potential of imaging software. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Introduction to Digital Photography."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2812. Intermediate Art Photography: Digital. 3 Credit Hours.

An intermediate level class in digital photography including the introduction of color photography and its relevant aesthetics, and the use of the web as a presentation medium. Emphasis is on conceptual growth and personal vision. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Intermediate Digital Photography."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2811|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2831. Art Photography / Digital On-Line. 3 Credit Hours.

This course teaches students the use of low-tech devices such as cell phones and point-and-shoot cameras for photography, video and sound recording. The results are posted to art-specific online visual communities similar to Facebook and YouTube. Responses from fellow students are evaluated in class critiques. This course raises the aesthetic bar above what is usually seen online. It teaches students how to see the world through a camera, organize the visual spaces found in their local community, and fill these photographs with meaningful content that can communicate the personal vision they develop during the semester to a broader audience.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 2835. Art Photo / Moving Image. 3 Credit Hours.

This course allows artists to use the medium of video to investigate their world. The technical end involves shooting digital video, transferring to computer, computer editing, post processing, sound editing and processing, and burning finished pieces to DVD. Students are also introduced to alternative ways of creating moving images using digital based animation software to investigate art of motion graphics. The aesthetics are from the art world rather than the commercial, documentary, or Hollywood styles. Knowledge of computers for visual application is expected. NOTE: This course is offered in Tokyo only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2601|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ARTU 2811|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 2900. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

In this studio art course, approaches to making and understanding images in various media will be addressed.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

ARTU 3103. Advanced Painting. 3 Credit Hours.

Painting as an art form with emphasis upon disciplined draftsmanship and imaginative composition. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Painting Workshop."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 3203. Advanced 3-D. 3 Credit Hours.

Workshop course for students wishing to focus on advanced 3-D with emphasis on individual instruction. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Advanced 3-D I."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2202|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 3303. Advanced Printmaking. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of advanced printmaking problems. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Advanced Printmaking I."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 2301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 2302|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ARTU 2311|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 2312|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ARTU 3321|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 3321. Intermediate Printmaking: Digital. 3 Credit Hours.

This course integrates a variety of digital applications and the traditional printmaking processes of relief, intaglio and lithography. Emphasis is on creative growth and individual instruction. Printmaking experience is required and computer imaging experience is recommended. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Digital Printmaking."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 2601|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 2301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ARTU 2311|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 3403. Advanced Drawing. 3 Credit Hours.

Drawing as an art form with emphasis upon disciplined draftsmanship and imaginative composition. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Intermediate Drawing I."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2402|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 3601. Multimedia Studio. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced course in which students explore the computer as a tool for artists. Students will be expected to explore their personal imagery and artistic goals through using the computer to make several long-term ambitious projects using computer screen as their primary medium.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 3602. Digital Mixed Media Studio. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced course in which students explore the computer as an artistic tool in combination with other materials. Students will be expected to explore their personal imagery and artistic goals through using the computer to make several long-term ambitious projects that exist primarily outside the computer screen.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 3603. Advanced Computer Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced course in which students explore the computer as a tool for artists. Students will be expected to explore their personal imagery and artistic goals through using the computer to make several long-term ambitious projects.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2602|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 3803. Advanced Art Photography: Darkroom. 3 Credit Hours.

This upper-level class involves the collection of aesthetic and technical tools, organized into a photographic vocabulary and the subsequent generation of a body of work that communicates a personal vision that ultimately evokes a meaningful response from an audience. Fiber-based papers, toners, and some unique aesthetic approach are required. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Intermediate Darkroom Photography."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2802|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 3813. Advanced Art Photography: Digital. 3 Credit Hours.

An upper-level course in digital photography. Emphasis is on conceptual growth through individual instruction. Advanced forms of presentation, including multiple prints, interactive images, and dynamic photographs are considered. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Advanced Digital Photography."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 2812|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 3825. Intermediate Art Photography: Hybrid. 3 Credit Hours.

This upper-level course introduces a wide range of processes that integrate digital and darkroom techniques and aesthetics to produce work in this new genre of photography. The students must have experience with both darkroom and digital photography. Aesthetic problems are posed that use the formal characteristics of these special media to support image content to best advantage. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Introduction to Hybrid Photography."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 2801|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ARTU 2811|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ARTU 2812|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 3826. Advanced Art Photography: Hybrid. 3 Credit Hours.

This advanced level class extends the opportunity to study and develop the use of photographic media that integrate digital and darkroom processes and aesthetics to produce a meaningful body of work in this new genre of photography. The students must have experience with both darkroom and digital photography. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Intermediate Hybrid Photography."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 2811|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ARTU 2812|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ARTU 3825|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4148. Painting Workshop. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced level drawing course focusing on the refinement of skills and personal expression. Individual instruction and self motivation are emphasized. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was 3104 "Painting Workshop II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 4149. Painting Portfolio. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced level painting course focusing on making finished quality work to build a portfolio. Individual instruction and motivation are emphasized.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 3103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 4148|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4182. Independent Study: Painting. 3 Credit Hours.

This course allows the student to explore an area of study that lies outside regular course offering, working independently although under the supervision of a faculty member. All proposals must be approved by the department chair.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 3103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ARTU 4149|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4248. 3-D Workshop. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced level 3D course focusing on the refinement of skills and personal expression. Individual instruction and motivation are emphasized. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was 3204 "Advanced 3-D II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 4249. 3-D Portfolio. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced level 3D course focusing on making finished quality work to build a portfolio. Individual instruction and motivation are emphasized.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

ARTU 4282. Independent Study: 3-D. 3 Credit Hours.

This course allows the student to explore an area of study that lies outside regular course offering, working independently although under the supervision of a faculty member. All proposals must be approved by the department chair.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

ARTU 4348. Printmaking Workshop. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study of aesthetics and techniques of contemporary printmaking provide an in-depth appreciation of etching, lithography, relief printing and intaglio type processes. Students may concentrate in one print medium. Individual and group work is required. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Printmaking Portfolio I."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 3303|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 4349. Printmaking Portfolio. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study in advanced printmaking with emphasis on individual instruction. The preparation of a professional portfolio of editions and/or series is required. Various aspects of a studio career will be covered including: resumes, artists' statements, photographing work, and presentations. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Printmaking Portfolio II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 4382. Independent Study: Printmaking. 3 Credit Hours.

This course allows the student to explore an area of printmaking outside regular course offering, working independently although under the supervision of a faculty member. The department chair must approve a written proposal. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was 3304 "Advanced Printmaking II."

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ARTU 2111|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ARTU 2402|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4448. Drawing Workshop. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced level drawing course focusing on the refinement of skills and personal expression. Individual instruction and motivation are emphasized. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was 4405 "Drawing Workshop I."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ARTU 3403|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ARTU 4449. Drawing Portfolio. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced level drawing course focusing on making finished quality work to build a portfolio. Individual instruction and motivation are emphasized. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was 4406 "Drawing Workshop II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 3403|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 4448|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4482. Independent Study: Drawing. 3 Credit Hours.

This course allows the student to explore an area of drawing that lies outside regular course offering, working independently although under the supervision of a faculty member. A written proposal must be approved by the department chair.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 3403|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 4448|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 4449|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4648. Computer Imaging Workshop. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study of aesthetics and techniques of computer imaging with emphasis on individual instruction.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 4649. Computer Imaging Portfolio. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study of aesthetics and techniques of computer imaging with emphasis on individual instruction. The preparation of a professional portfolio is required.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 4682. Independent Study: Computer Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course allows the student to explore an area of study in computer imaging outside the regular course offering, working independently although under the supervision of a faculty member. A written proposal must be approved by the department chair.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 2602|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 2605|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 3603|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4785. Field Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers experiential learning and hands-on training in student's field of choice. NOTE: For Art and Art Education Majors only with Special Authorization.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

ARTU 4796. Art Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this writing intensive upper-level studio course is to help the advanced student find his/her own voice through independent studio projects and writing assignments. The class will meet as a group and the instructor will also meet individually with students. NOTE: Additional prerequisites for studio concentration: ART 2101 (0118), 2402 (0140), 2111 (0159) and two printmaking courses. For digital concentration: one printmaking or photo, three digital electives, and two studio electives or two non-digital electives. For visual studies concentration: one printmaking, photo, or computer imaging course plus four classes from the concentration group.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTU 4848. Art Photography Workshop. 3 Credit Hours.

A top-level course for the study of advanced photographic techniques and aesthetics. The student is expected to design a course of study (proposal required) that is particular to his or her own interests and that involves aspects of photography not available in the other course offerings. Work can be realized in either the darkroom or digital studio and must include unique techniques, aesthetics, and presentation. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Advanced Photo Study I."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 3803|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 3813|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 3825|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4849. Art Photography Portfolio. 3 Credit Hours.

A top-level course for the study of advanced photographic techniques and aesthetics with an emphasis on the creation of all artwork and documentation needed to build a portfolio. The student is expected to define an aesthetic philosophy that is particular to his or her own interests (proposal required). Work can be realized in either the darkroom or digital studio and must include unique techniques, aesthetics, and presentation. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was titled "Advanced Photo Study II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ARTU 3803|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 3825|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ARTU 3826|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ARTU 4882. Independent Study: Art Photography. 3 Credit Hours.

This course allows the student to explore an area of photographic study outside our regular course offerings, working independently although under the supervision of a faculty member. A written proposal must be approved by the department chair. NOTE: Prior to Fall 2008, this course was 3804 "Advanced Darkroom Photography."

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

TUJ International Bus Studies Courses

JIBS 3101. Introduction to Global Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses corporate financing issues in the global financial environment relevant for international corporations or MNCs/MNEs. Topics to be discussed in the course will include: BOP accounts; foreign exchange-rate determination and markets; foreign exchange risk management; corporate strategy for foreign direct investment; valuation of foreign investments; global debt and equity financing, and project finance; international capital budgeting decision process associated with political, sovereign (country) and inflation risks. The perspective of cash versus equity purchases; mergers and acquisitions; comparisons of corporate governance practices around the world; and international taxation will also be touched upon and explored.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ACCT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ACCT 2902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JIBS 3102. Global Operations and Supply Chain Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to present and discuss concepts, issues and problems critical to global operations, with some emphasis on global supply chains. The course seeks to provide an understanding of the importance of individual components (suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and customers) in the operation of the supply chain. Coverage will include successful approaches in the areas of product and service design, global sourcing and logistics management, sales and operations planning, scheduling, resources planning, inventory management, and project management, among others, which have led to dramatic improvements in global business performance. Important recent developments and approaches for the effective and efficient operation of global supply chains will be identified and discussed. Also, in this course, a software package used for project management, such as MS Project, will be introduced.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2903|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2031|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JIBS 3501. Marketing in a Global Environment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course takes a culturally driven approach to International Marketing. It will examine how multinational companies adapt to international opportunity and constraints. Marketing topics covered include global marketing; government regulations; organizational structure; product, price, promotion, and credit policies and methods. The course will combine cases, discussions, and readings to provide a mix of integrating concepts and hands-on problem solving.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
MKTG 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MKTG 2901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JIBS 4197. Global Business Overview. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is about making business decisions in international environment. It takes the perspective of a general manager and will focus on the theme of valuation. Students will be challenged to evaluate the capital structure and business models of international enterprises in order to assess strategic options.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JIBS 4596. International Business Capstone. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an integrated course that focuses on strategic management and decision making in international enterprises. Students are challenged to design real-time solutions through the use of comprehensive live case studies. The course is designed to help you develop state-of-the-art business writing skills that are appropriate in both academic and professional contexts. Other important objectives include: (1) Information literacy: To provide students with opportunities to search for outside sources and with instruction related to searching for, evaluating, and/or using sources; (2) Cross-functional (capstone) perspective: To integrate the knowledge accumulated in various functional areas such as accounting, finance, marketing, human resources management and operations management; (3) Hypothesis-driven, fact-based, and action-oriented case work: To provide students with meaningful experience in analyzing strategic problems through the use of the real-time case method. At the end of the course, students should be able to write a basic strategic report that meets the professional standards of an international management consulting firm on junior associate level.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(HRM 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (JIBS 3501|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR JIBS 3102|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)

Japanese Courses

JPNS 0868. World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Political Science 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 0968. Honors World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Political Science 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 1001. Japanese Elements I. 4 Credit Hours.

First semester level of Japanese. Assumes no prior knowledge.

Course Attributes: LC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 1002. Japanese Elements II. 4 Credit Hours.

Second semester level of Japanese.

Course Attributes: LC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 1003. Oral Intensive Japanese I. 3 Credit Hours.

A bridge between beginning and intermediate Japanese levels, this course emphasizes vocabulary building and the use of spoken Japanese through situational conversational practice. Tests will be in the forms of listening and reading comprehension and structured interviews. An ability to read and write hiragana and katakana is required, as is a mastery of most basic grammatical rules.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 1301. Kanji I. 3 Credit Hours.

Kanji or Chinese characters are an integral part of Japanese orthography system, which is considered as a key factor to learners' reading comprehension and vocabulary building. However, Kanji is considered to be difficult and rather time-consuming to acquire, especially for learners from alphabetic orthography systems such as English speakers. This course is thus designed to promote students' understanding and mastery of 300 basic Kanji and to help them establish a solid foundation to learn novel and complex Kanji in the course of their learning Japanese. By mastering 300 basic Kanji, students will acquire the Kanji proficiency equivalent to JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) N4, and also improve their reading and writing skills in addition to vocabulary building. More important, students will learn how to "learn" novel Kanji.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2000. Special Topics I. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor and/or check the course schedule for specific topic.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

JPNS 2001. Intermediate Japanese I. 3 Credit Hours.

Third semester level of Japanese.

Course Attributes: LC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2002. Intermediate Japanese II. 3 Credit Hours.

Fourth semester level of Japanese.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR JPNS 2701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2003. Oral Intensive Japanese II. 3 Credit Hours.

A bridge between intermediate and advanced Japanese levels, this course focuses on vocabulary acquisition in a variety of conversational situations. Throughout the semester, several vocabulary quizzes and structure tests will be given, while the final exam will be in the form of interviews. Students are required to complete one project involving various communication activities outside the classroom.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR JPNS 2002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR JPNS 2702|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2010. Special Topics II. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor and/or check the course schedule for specific topic.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

JPNS 2011. Survey of Japanese Literature: Pre-Modern. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of memoirs, poetry, novels, and other genres is included in this survey of classical Japanese literature. Knowledge of Japanese language is not required. Note: JPNS 2011 and ASST 2011 are equivalent courses and students will not be able to receive credit for both.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 2012. Modern and Contemporary Japanese Literature in Translation. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of modern Japanese literature focusing on novels and short stories. Authors include Tanizaki, Kawabata, and Mishima. Note that knowledge of Japanese language is not required. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Survey of Japanese Literature: Modern." Note: This course is cross-listed with Asian Studies 2012. Students may only receive credit for one of these courses: ASST 2012 or JPNS 2012.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 2015. Tokyo in Literature and Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Like all great cities, Tokyo simultaneously fascinates and frightens us. The course explores this fascination and fear through the work of leading writers and directors who have responded to and shaped the city in their work. Readings will include essays, short stories, and novels by authors such as Yasunari Kawabata, Fumiko Hayashi, Banana Yoshimoto, and Haruki Murakami. Films by directors such as Yasujiro Ozu, Satoshi Kon, and Shosuke Murakami will be reviewed and discussed. Note: This course is cross-listed with Asian Studies 2015. Students may only receive credit for one of these courses: ASST 2015 or JPNS 2015.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 2016. Mystery and Crime Fiction in Japan. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines mystery and crime fiction in Japan through the work of writers such as Edogawa Rampo, Matsumoto Seicho, and Kirino Natsuo. Through critical analysis of novels and short stories, we'll seek insights into the anxieties and tensions of life in modern and contemporary Japan. We'll explore a range of socio-cultural issues in areas such as family life, education, careers, and gender relations. All readings and discussions are in English. Note: This course is cross-listed with Asian Studies 2016. Students may only receive credit for one of these courses: ASST 2016 or JPNS 2016.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 2017. Stories of Parents and Children in Japanese Literature and Film. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the portrayal of family relationships in modern and contemporary Japanese fiction and film. Topics for study and discussion include the tension between the older and younger generations, and changing understandings of the family within Japanese society. The work of writers and filmmakers such as Soseki Natsume, Yasujiro Ozu, Kafu Nagai, Hirokazu Kore-eda, and Haruki Murakami will be examined. Class discussions and activities, readings, and written assignments aim at developing students' critical skills. Knowledge of Japanese is not required. Note: This course is cross-listed with Asian Studies 2017. Students may only receive credit for one of these courses: ASST 2017 or JPNS 2017.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 2021. Japanese Literature in Film. 3 Credit Hours.

A look at cinematic adaptations of Japanese novels and short stories. Discussions and assignments develop analytical and critical skills in reading literary and cinematic texts selected from the works of the principal figures of Japanese literature and film, such as Tanizaki, Mishima, and Kurosawa. Note that knowledge of Japanese language is not required. Note: This course is cross-listed with Asian Studies 2021. Students may only receive credit for one of these courses: ASST 2021, ASST 2921, JPNS 2021, or JPNS 2921.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 2050. The Japanese Writer in Focus. 3 Credit Hours.

This special topics course offers students the opportunity for in-depth reading, study, and discussion of the novels and short stories of one or two modern or contemporary Japanese writers. The work of writers who are highly regarded both in Japan and globally - such as Haruki Murakami, Kenzaburo Oe, Natsume Soseki, and Yukio Mishima - will be the focus of the course. Students will also be introduced to published scholarship on the writer's work. All readings are English translations of work originally published in Japanese. Note: This course is cross-listed with Asian Studies 2050. Students may only receive credit for one of these courses: ASST 2050 or JPNS 2050.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

JPNS 2301. Kanji II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a continuation of Kanji I and designed to promote students' understanding and mastery of an additional 300 (or more) Kanji at the intermediate level. By mastering the additional 300 Kanji, students will acquire the Kanji proficiency equivalent to JLPT N3, and also improve their reading and writing skills in addition to vocabulary building.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2522. Basic Writing in Japanese. 3 Credit Hours.

Japanese 2522 is designed to introduce students whose native language is not Japanese to basic-level writing skills that go beyond mere sentence manipulation drills. With a focus on paragraph development, students will learn, step by step, the organizational principles that will help them express themselves effectively in Japanese on familiar topics, such as family, daily activities, personal possessions and experiences. Students will also learn to incorporate newly learned vocabulary and structures effectively into their writing to further enhance their overall Japanese language skills.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 2701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2631. Structure of Japanese Language I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to accomplish three major objectives to further develop students' Japanese language proficiency. First, it will help students have a strong command of the basic and more complicated rules of Japanese grammar already introduced in Japanese 1001, 1002, 2001, & 2002. Second, it will also help students further improve their fluency in both comprehension and production. Lastly, it will also help students pass N4 of JLPT.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 3001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2701. TUJ - Japanese Intermediate I. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a TUJ unique 2nd year, Intermediate Japanese course, and the first half of the intermediate Japanese language courses. It adopts an integrated approach to develop students' communicative competence for everyday communication. Upon successful completion of the intermediate courses, students will be able to demonstrate the proficiency level equivalent to N4 of JLPT. In addition to the course work and assignment, students are strongly recommended to spend at least one hour per week at the language lab.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2702. TUJ - Japanese Intermediate II. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a TUJ unique 2nd year Intermediate Japanese course. This is the second half of the intermediate Japanese language courses. It adopts an integrated approach to develop students' communicative competence for everyday communication. Upon successful completion of the intermediate courses, students will be able to demonstrate the proficiency level equivalent to N4 of JLPT. In addition to the course work and assignments, students are strongly recommended to spend at least one hour per week at the language lab.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR JPNS 2701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 2782. Independent Study in Japanese. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Independent study in Japanese.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

JPNS 2921. Honors Japanese Literature in Film. 3 Credit Hours.

A look at cinematic adaptations of Japanese novels and short stories. Discussions and assignments develop analytical and critical skills in reading literary and cinematic texts selected from the works of the principal figures of Japanese literature and film, such as Tanizaki, Mishima, and Kurosawa. Note that knowledge of Japanese language is not required.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 3000. Special Topics in Japanese I. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics will focus on aspects of the language, literature, or culture of Japan.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

JPNS 3001. Advanced Japanese I. 3 Credit Hours.

Fifth semester level of Japanese.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 2002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR JPNS 2702|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 3002. Advanced Japanese II. 3 Credit Hours.

Sixth semester level of Japanese.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 3001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 3003. Advanced Japanese Writing. 3 Credit Hours.

A course for students who feel secure in the fundamentals of writing in the Japanese language but who want additional instruction beyond the introductory composition courses to improve their writing. This course focuses on one of two writing styles depending on the semester: formal and academic essays (ronbun) and personal and impressionistic essays (zuihitsu). Ask the instructor which style will be focused on during the semester for which you are going to register. There will be a lot of speed writing in class for students to prepare for a company essay test. Note that this course may be taken by native speakers of Japanese.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

JPNS 3010. Special Topics in Japanese II. 3 Credit Hours.

A continuation of Japanese 3000 (Critical Languages 0222). Topics will focus on aspects of the language, literature, or culture of Japan.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

JPNS 3096. Intermediate Writing in Japanese. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will learn intermediate-level writing skills in Japanese built on their basic writing skills. They will learn to write multiple-paragraph essays appropriate for various Japanese writing styles. For many Japanese learners, not being able to write effectively in Japanese is a major concern, especially for college students. To this end, the course deals with elements that help improve the quality of a written product, including grammar, structure, logic, and most importantly, organization. In the intermediate writing course, students are required to write insightful essays incorporating their experiences and reading/researched materials using appropriate cohesive devices.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 3001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 3631. Structure of Japanese Language II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to accomplish four major objectives. First, it will help students have a strong command of the advanced rules of Japanese grammar already learned in Japanese 3001 and 3002 to practice with complete control. Second, it will help students further improve their fluency both in comprehension and production in academic discourse. Third, it will also help students further develop their communicative competence, focusing on sociolinguistic and pragmatic aspects of Japanese language. Students will learn how to appropriately deal with social dominance, the social distance, and a variety of situations in advanced discourse. Lastly, it will help students pass N3 of JPLT.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 3002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 3900. Honors Special Topics: Japanese. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester. This is an Honors course.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

JPNS 4001. Japanese Advanced III. 3 Credit Hours.

This course has 5 major goals. First, it will help students develop a higher level of reading and writing skills, and familiarize with socio-cultural topics. Second, it will help students improve their levels of formality in speaking in different situations of their everyday conversation and academic discourse. Third, it will also help students develop critical thinking and manners for discussion in Japanese. Fourth, it will help students learn idiomatic expressions and more involved syntactical forms. Lastly, it will help students pass N2 of the JLPT.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 3002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 4002. Japanese Advanced IV. 3 Credit Hours.

This is the last one of four courses in a series of Advanced Japanese courses which focuses on the levels of formality or politeness in conversation as well as on fifteen socio-cultural topics in the Japanese speaking community. This course covers chapters 13, 14, and 15 of the textbook. The course is designed to accomplish four major objectives. First, it will help students develop a higher level of reading and writing skills, and familiarize with haiku as well as socio-cultural topics. Second, it will also help students develop critical thinking, interview and debate skills in Japanese. Third, it will help students learn more involved idiomatic expressions and syntactical forms. Lastly, it will help students pass N2 of Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT). To achieve these goals, this course will provide students with three reading topics: Japanese people and Nature, Politics in Japan, and the Future of World and Japan, in a variety of forms (i.e., reading and speaking based discussion). Each topic has its own focus in the speaking section such as interviewing, debating academic and social issues, and agreeing and disagreeing with others' opinions, to appropriately deal with the issues of politeness. Students are expected to use integrated skills to deal with each task presented in each chapter and also to build up their vocabulary and learn Chinese characters (Kanji) while completing reading, speaking, and grammar tasks. Moreover, students are required to conduct interviews with three people about a socio-cultural issue selected and to make a report on the results in two forms: an oral report in class and a written short paper.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 4001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 4003. Advanced Oral Japanese. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides both oral and aural practice in Japanese by introducing theoretical and practical aspects of oral/aural skills. It is designed and intended for students who have successfully completed three years of Japanese language learning (Japanese Advanced II), and requires students' advanced reading/writing skills in order to prepare their speech scripts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 3002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 4031. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics I. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to some important findings and theories in linguistics and to the description of the sound stratum of Japanese contrastive analysis with English sounds. This is the first of three courses in a series under the course title "Introduction to Japanese Linguistics." The course does not provide any actual teaching training, but it does include essential information that Japanese-language teachers ought to have. Classes and examinations will be conducted in Japanese. Students are required to write a term paper in Japanese. Note that this course may be taken by native speakers of Japanese.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 4032. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics II. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the problems of orthographical rules and to the contrastive studies of Japanese and English grammar (syntax and morphology). This is the second of three courses in a series under the course title "Introduction to Japanese Linguistics." The course does not provide any actual teaching training, but does include essential information that Japanese-language teachers ought to have. Classes and examinations will be conducted in Japanese. Students are required to make some oral presentations and to write a term paper in Japanese. Note that this course may be taken by native speakers of Japanese.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 4033. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics III. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the application of linguistic principles to the learning and teaching of the Japanese language. This is the third of three courses in a series under the course title "Introduction to Japanese Linguistics." Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions and to complete various projects of their own development whose results they then present orally and in writing as term papers. Classes and examinations will be conducted in Japanese. Note that this course may be taken by native speakers of Japanese.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

JPNS 4182. Japanese Independent Study I. 3 Credit Hours.

An independent-study course arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 3002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 4196. Seminar in Japanese and Japan: Japanese Society and Culture through Newspaper. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminar in Japanese and Japan is a capstone course that builds on the solid foundation of advanced linguistics skills, socio-cultural knowledge, and critical thinking that students have acquired. It also marks their final stage of Japanese language learning. Three topics (Topic I: Socio-cultural, Topic II: Business, Topic III: Literature) are offered alternately and designed to allow students to select and pursue a topic of their interest. In the courses, students will learn to read critically and properly appreciate the original texts of a selected topic. While reading about socio-cultural aspects, topics/issues in business, or literature, students will further their understanding of Japanese language. This course focuses on reading on socio-cultural aspects of Japan by reading newspapers. Newspapers are one of the main sources of information to learn about the society's present status, social and political problems, and perspectives for future. In this course, students will learn the most up-to-date information of Japanese society and develop their reading skills and comprehension by reading newspapers. To achieve those goals, the course is divided into two parts. The first half of the course will be devoted to developing reading skills and building lexicon necessary to understand newspaper articles as well as the stylistics and format characteristic of newspapers (e.g., the use of abbreviations and technical terms in the headlines and leads). In order to increase readiness for reading newspapers, students will read 5-7 short passages a day (with a complete vocabulary list) on a variety of topics. Students' acquisition of new vocabulary and expressions will be tested on a daily basis. In the second half of the semester, students will read Japanese newspaper articles weekly. Each week, two articles will be chosen for a class reading followed by discussions. In addition, each student will choose an article for a weekly oral report. Through reading and class discussions, students are expected to gain in-depth understanding and analytical views of contemporary Japanese society and culture.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 4001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 4282. Japanese Independent Study II. 3 Credit Hours.

An independent-study course arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 3002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 4296. Seminar in Japanese and Japan: Business. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminar in Japanese and Japan is a capstone course that builds on the solid foundation of advanced linguistics skills, socio-cultural knowledge, and critical thinking that students have acquired. It also marks their final stage of Japanese language learning. Three topics (Topic I: Socio-cultural, Topic II: Business, Topic III: Literature) are offered alternately and designed to allow students to select and pursue a topic of their interest. In the courses, students will learn to read critically and properly appreciate the original texts of a selected topic. While reading about socio-cultural aspects, topics/issues in business, or literature, students will further their understanding of Japanese language. Topic II has a special focus on business, and is designed to introduce students to basic concepts and current issues of business both in the domestic and international markets. Students will explore basic concepts of business, building up new vocabulary items, examining major and important terms used in discussing business and reading short articles on current topics. Moreover, students will explore a variety of short articles concerning current topics in economics, politics, and business law as well, for business is tightly connected with these three topics. Lastly, students will also learn how to conduct, write, and present a simple version of secondary research paper on one of the topics in business.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 4001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

JPNS 4396. Seminar in Japanese and Japan: Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminar in Japanese and Japan is a capstone course that builds on the solid foundation of advanced linguistics skills, socio-cultural knowledge, and critical thinking that students have acquired. It also marks their final stage of Japanese language learning. Three topics (Topic I: Socio-cultural, Topic II: Business, Topic III: Literature) are offered alternately and designed to allow students to select and pursue a topic of their interest. In the courses, students will learn to read critically and properly appreciate the original texts of a selected topic. While reading about socio-cultural aspects, topics/issues in business, or literature, students will further their understanding of Japanese language. This course has a special focus on the Japanese literature, and is designed to introduce students to representative short stories by contemporary writers in the original Japanese texts. Reading literature requires one's critical thinking and in-depth understanding of historical, social, cultural and linguistic background in addition to rhetoric and stylistics. In this course, short stories are selected for their readability and manageable length so that students will be able to sample different styles and genres by different writers.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
JPNS 4001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

Temple University Japan Courses

TUJ 1001. TUJ Bridge Seminar 1. 1 Credit Hour.

This one-credit course introduces Bridge Program students to the opportunities and rigors of higher education, as well as to the skills needed to use academic resources successfully in college. This course is designed to help students make a successful transition to university life and learn to function as members of their academic community.

Student Attribute Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: TUJ Bridge Program.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

TUJ 1002. Bridge Seminar 2: Academic Research for International Students. 1 to 2 Credit Hour.

This two-credit course introduces TUJ Bridge Program students to university-level research skills. Students will learn about the purpose and processes of academic research in different areas of study, and plan, develop, and complete an independent research project during the semester. This course aims to develop information literacy skills students need in General Education and major courses at an American university. Course is restricted to TUJ Bridge Students only.

Student Attribute Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: TUJ Bridge Program.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
TUJ 1001|Minimum Grade of D-|May not be taken concurrently.