Fox School of Business & Management

Founded 1918

M. Moshe Porat, Dean
362 Alter Hall
1801 Liacouras Walk
215-204-7676
www.fox.temple.edu

Accreditation

Established in 1918, the Fox School of Business and Management at Temple University has a distinguished tradition of preparing business leaders, professionals and entrepreneurs for successful careers. Today, it is the largest, most comprehensive business school in the greater Philadelphia region, and among the largest in the world with 6,500 students, 175 full-time faculty and more than 59,000 alumni. Accredited by AACSB International — Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business — the Fox School offers BBA, BS, MBA, Executive MBA, International MBA, Online MBA, MBA/MS, MS and PhD programs on campuses throughout the region and around the world. 

Vision

With nearly a hundred years of history behind us, our vision is to be a top public urban business school in the country, and among the leading business schools in the world.

Values

We transform lives by creating and sharing knowledge, while instilling values that prepare leaders for tomorrow’s world. Our vision and values guide our teaching, research and school management.

  • Excellence: We value excellence in teaching, research, and school management.
  • Creativity: We value innovation and creative thinking.
  • An entrepreneurial culture: We value effective decision-making and entrepreneurial implementation of ideas.
  • Ethical behavior and respect for others: We value ethical practice and respect for diverse perspectives.
  • Community Engagement: We value building partnerships with all stakeholders and the community we serve. 

Mission Statement

Transform lives through education. Russell Conwell’s mission was to provide a gateway to opportunity for talented and determined students, including those with lesser financial means. We build on this mission, making sure our students acquire the skills they will need in the global marketplace.

We are committed to the following:

  • Providing quality, student-centered business education.
  • Engaging in relevant research and advanced doctoral training and expanding the frontiers of knowledge and business education.
  • Extending our education, research and outreach efforts to be responsive to the driving forces of our economy including globalization, sustainability, ethics, entrepreneurship, innovation, and technology.
  • Integrating leading-edge information technology into teaching, learning, research, and school management necessary for managing in an increasingly competitive, dynamic, global economy.
  • Providing the best professional development and career management opportunities for our students, faculty, and staff with special efforts to facilitate development of ethical values, social networking skills, and leadership.
  • Linking, through our curriculum, research and outreach to the dominant and growth industries in our region: financial services, healthcare, pharmaceuticals/biotechnology, information technology, and tourism.
  • Engaging our diverse stakeholders to improve our school and serve our community.

Learning Goals and Assurance of Learning

The four main learning goals for the Bachelor of Business Administration Program seek to assure students will:

  • Understand critical business concepts.
  • Apply critical thinking to business problems.
  • Demonstrate effective oral and written communication. 
  • Understand the ethical, legal, and social responsibilities of individuals and organizations.

Specific learning objectives include:

  • Understand critical business concepts 
    • Apply a core body of discipline-specific knowledge to business situations.
    • Recognize the competitive and operational role of organizational information systems.
    • Apply quantitative analysis and interpretation to business problems.
  • Apply critical thinking to business problems
    • Interpret an enterprise-wide case study and recommend solutions.
    • Use cross-disciplinary knowledge to identify problems and their causes, generate alternative solutions, and arrive at reasoned conclusions.
    • Use information technology to analyze and implement business decisions.
  • Demonstrate effective oral and written communication
    • Formulate reasoned arguments orally.
    • Formulate reasoned arguments in written communication.
    • Apply team-work and communication skills to present and support conclusions.
  • Understand the ethical, legal, and social responsibilities of individuals and organizations.
    • Understand ethical issues.
    • Assess the impact of managers and employees as agents, including the impact of their decisions on the organization, its stockholders, its employees, its customers and the community-at-large.
    • Apply stakeholder analysis to social and business issues and consider and evaluate possible conflicts of interests

More information is available at Learning Goals.

Special Facilities & Programs

Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD)

The Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD) is an active partner in your collegiate experience at the Fox School of Business and Management. Besides academic preparation, professional development is important to your preparation for life after graduation. Consequently, the Fox School has integrated a unique professional development component into both the undergraduate and graduate curricula. 

Rather than simply focus on the traditional career elements such as resume development and interview strategies, etc., CSPD strives to differentiate you by taking a multi-faceted approach with a focus on personal development, career/industry awareness and impression management. This strategy in combination with job search coaching will truly make a difference in terms of your marketability.

CSPD services/resources:

  • One-on-one coaching sessions

  • Group workshops

  • On-line career resources

  • Job postings/resume referrals

  • Web-based career management system – FoxNet

  • On-campus recruiting

  • Industry (Mock) interviews

  • Executive speaker series

  • Networking events with employers/alumni

  • Annual Leadership Retreats

  • BA 2101 – Professional Development Strategies course (BBA)

As mentioned, CSPD is your partner in this process. This means YOU need to take an active role in your professional/career development. The time and energy you invest in your job and internship search will be reflected in the career opportunities available to you.

You have already invested in your future by pursuing a business degree from the Fox School. However, a degree alone will not land you that ideal job. Take the next step and make your investment pay off by taking advantage of the resources CSPD has to offer and start creating your “dream job” strategy from day one!

Internship Programs 

The Center for Student Professional Development and Student Professional Organizations work in partnership with employers to connect students with a wide variety of internship positions, both full and part-time. For more information on internship opportunities, please contact the student professional organization for your major or the Center for Student Professional Development at 215-204-2371.   

Honors Program

The Fox School of Business and Management offers a stimulating Honors Program for students who demonstrate exceptional ability and achievement in their studies. High school students with SAT scores of at least 1420 (Math and Critical Reading/Writing average) or an ACT (Composite) of 32 and rank in the top 10% of their class are automatically reviewed for admission at the time of application to the University. Continuing/transfer students with at least a 3.70 grade point average are encouraged to apply. All students must first apply and be accepted to the University Honors Program. The program consists of a minimum number of academic classes and completion of a yearly leadership component. Students earn an Honors Certificate and transcript designation upon completion of the program.

Students admitted to the Fox Honors Program may apply to join the Alter Research Scholars program prior to the start of their junior year. Alter Research Scholars work with faculty mentors on research projects in their chosen field. The research culminates in a senior thesis that students present during the spring of their senior year. Special scholarships are available for the two-year Alter Research Scholars program.

Students who enter the Fox Honors Program are encouraged to join the Business Honors Student Association, as well as the student organization in their major. For more information about the Fox Honors Program and the Alter Research Scholars Program, please contact Dr. Robert Pred, Academic Director, Fox Honors Program, Alter Hall LL30 or Charles Allen, Administrative Director, 215-204-4101, or visit the web site.

Pre-Business Program

The Pre-Business program is a first-time freshman year program operated by the Fox School of Business and Management and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management (STHM). The program is designed to prepare students to successfully transition to the academic rigors of an undergraduate business degree program.

Pre-Business students will take several foundation courses required by the Bachelors of Business Administration degree program, while gaining access to quality resources and services to help them effectively navigate their first year at Temple. The Pre-Business program leverages a network of assistance programs at the university to provide students a greater opportunity for scholastic achievement.

For further information, go to the Pre-Business page.

Honorary Societies, Awards, & Student Associations

Beta Gamma Sigma 

The Gamma Chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, the international honorary business society, was installed in the Fox School of Business and Management in March 1935. Membership is limited to standing-year juniors and seniors who are in the upper 10 percent of their class. The members of Beta Gamma Sigma are elected on the basis of high scholarship. Eligible students will be notified by the Dean in March and invited to attend a special induction ceremony in May. Please contact Lori Roseman at 215-204-4101 for more information.

Alpha Mu Alpha

A national marketing honorary society, established by the American Marketing Association in 1981, to recognize and reward the scholastic achievement of marketing students as well as academic excellence in the discipline and science of marketing. To be invited to join Alpha Mu Alpha, marketing majors are required to have 90+ credit hours and be in the top 15% of their class based on GPA. Inductions are made for graduating students in Spring and Fall. For more information, please contact the AMA Faculty Advisor, Mary Conran at mary.conran@temple.edu.

Beta Alpha Psi 

This national honorary fraternity was established for students of accountancy, finance, and information systems. For more information, please contact the officers of Beta Alpha Psi at 215-204-8889 or view their web site.

Financial Management Association/National Honor Society 

This national honorary society strives to provide opportunities to enhance the professional development of its members. For more information, contact the FMA executive officers at 215-204-6673, or go to The Fox School | Financial Management Association.

Gamma Iota Sigma

This is an international Risk Management, Insurance, and Actuarial Science fraternity. The purpose of the Sigma Chapter of Gamma Iota Sigma is to encourage, establish, and enhance the professionalism of students in the Risk Management, Healthcare Risk Management, and Actuarial Science programs. Contact Dr. R.B. Drennan in the Risk, Insurance, and Healthcare Management Department at 215-204-8894 or contact the GIS Officers at 215-204-9368. 

Student Organizations

www.fox.temple.edu/cms_career/student-professional-organizations

As part of the student's overall professional development, all Fox students are strongly encouraged to participate in student organizations, professional associations, and academic fraternities. All major areas of concentration in the undergraduate curriculum have an associated organization. Freshmen and sophomores can utilize the organizations to find out more about the major fields of study available to them. The student organizations provide an opportunity for students to meet one another outside the classroom as well as to meet practicing professionals from industry and government. Many organizations have an array of social activities that range from fund raising and community service projects to evening gatherings.

The Fox School of Business and Management has the following student professional organizations:

  • Ascend
  • American Marketing Association
  • Association for Information Systems
  • Beta Alpha Psi
  • Business Honors Student Association
  • Entrepreneurial Student Association
  • Financial Management Association/National Honor Society
  • Gamma Iota Sigma
  • International Business Association
  • Institute of Management Accountants
  • National Association for Black Accountants
  • Net Impact
  • Phi Alpha Delta Pre-Law Fraternity
  • Phi Beta Lambda Business Fraternity
  • Professional Sales Organization
  • Temple Real Estate Organization
  • Temple University Investment Association
  • Temple University Supply Chain Association
  • The Society for Human Resource Management
  • Temple Economics Society
  • Toastmasters

Please contact the College Council Officers at 215-204-6660 for more information about student organizations on the Main Campus. At the Ambler Campus, please call 267-468-8100.

Fox School of Business & Management College Council (FSBMCC)

The college council is comprised of the presidents from each of the recognized Fox student organizations, associations, and fraternities. The council's role is to assist the individual student organizations in recruiting members, obtaining funding, sponsoring activities, identifying outside speakers, and communicating with students. The college council sponsors volunteer opportunities, student organization fairs, and social events for all Fox students. The council also works closely with the dean's office and the Center for Student Professional Development to identify issues that are of concern to students and the student organizations. To contact the Main Campus college council, please call 215-204-6660. At the Ambler Campus, please call 267-468-8100.

Student Contact

Debbie Campbell
Vice Dean, Undergraduate Programs
Alter Hall 375
215-204-3919
dcampbell@temple.edu

Julian R. White
Director, Center for Undergraduate Advising
Speakman Hall 102
215-204-4558
julian.white@temple.edu

Camille M. Fallon
Associate Director, Freshman/Sophomore Unit
Speakman Hall 104
215-204-1761
camille.fallon@temple.edu

Jennifer VanDeWoestyne
Associate Director, Junior/Senior Unit
Speakman Hall 101
215-204-0923
jennvdw@temple.edu

Elvita Quiñones
Associate Director, Online BBA & Ambler Campus
Speakman Hall 102
215-204-5809 (Main) / 267-468-8350 (Ambler)
elvita.quinones@temple.edu

Academic Policies & Regulations

The university policies and regulations apply to all undergraduate students and provide a framework within which schools and colleges may specify further conditions or variations appropriate to students in their courses or programs. Policies specific to FSBM are as follows: 

Anticipation of Graduation

Students must submit an application for graduation using the University online graduation application in Self Service Banner prior to the Continuing Student Registration period for their final semester. The Fox School of Business and Management requires students to submit an electronic "Request for Graduation Review" prior to registration for their final semester. Current graduation information is available from the Center for Undergraduate Advising.

Courses Inapplicable to Graduation Requirements

Semester hours earned in SRAP or ELECT, Preparatory Mathematics (formerly Mathematics 0001 or 0015), and lower-division (under 3000) Military Science courses do not yield academic credit toward the minimum total of 124. 

Credit is only awarded in academic subjects with a corresponding Temple department. Duplicate credit in the same course is not awarded in any case.

Students will not receive credits for lower-level courses after successful completion of higher-level courses in sequenced courses of study. This only applies to the First Year Writing sequence in English (ENG 0701-ENG 0802) and all courses in Mathematics and Foreign Languages. For example, after passing SPAN 1002, a student will not receive credits for SPAN 1001.

Co-Requisites And Prerequisites

Students may be de-enrolled from courses for which they do not meet prerequisites and co-requisites. (Please see the Prerequisites and Co-requisites policy for more information.) Students are responsible for reviewing and abiding by all course prerequisites and co-requisites in the Course Catalog. The requirements are designed to assure that students are appropriately prepared to be successful in their courses. Prerequisites provide an efficient manner for students to register for the next course in a sequence for which they are prepared. 

Dean's List

Each fall and spring semester, those undergraduates who have met the credit hour and academic criteria for their school or college are placed on the Dean's List. See the Dean's List policy for specific GPA and credit-hour requirements.

Probation and Dismissal

Students in the Fox School of Business and Management are bound by the university policy on Academic Standing.

Grade Point Average Requirement for Graduation

Fox students are required to attain a 2.0 (2.0 = C) average in all of their Temple coursework and in their major in order to graduate from the Fox School of Business and Management. Some courses may have specific higher minimum grade requirements for degree applicability. Please check current course descriptions and the section pertaining to your major for this information. In addition, the Center for Undergraduate Advising provides a Major GPA calculator.

Life Experience

The Fox School of Business and Management does not offer credits for life experiences. Please see Credit for Prior Learning under the Academic Policies section of this Bulletin for information about advanced placement or CLEP examinations.

Leave of Absence/Re-enrollment/Reinstatement

Fox students who wish to voluntarily withdraw from the university for one or two semesters (fall and/or spring) are strongly encouraged to apply for a Leave of Absence (LOA). If approved, these students remain eligible for the same requirements as when they declared their major and will have access to Temple e-mail, university library systems, and priority and self registration for the approved semester of return. By contrast, students who leave the university without any notice and without an approved LOA must apply to be re-enrolled and, if allowed to return, must follow the most recent university curricular requirements in place for the semester of their return. If no LOA was filed, before students return, they must indicate any course(s) taken since leaving Temple and provide a copy of an official transcript from each institution attended. Students who received a medical withdrawal may be asked to provide medical documentation clearing them to return to school and to schedule an interview with an advisor before a re-enrollment decision can be made. Any existing holds must be cleared prior to re-enrollment.

Leave of Absence and Re-enrollment forms are available online. Further details can be viewed at Policy_02.10.16.

Students who were dismissed for academic reasons should see the university policy on Academic Standing.

Repeating Courses

University policy restricts the number of times students can enroll in the same course to three times. Permission is required to register for the third attempt of the same course. Students should work closely with an academic advisor to review their options when required to repeat a course. Students who fail to complete a "College Graduation Requirement" in three attempts will be required to change their program to one outside the Fox School of Business and Management. Students who fail to complete a required major course listed in their academic program will be required to change to a different major. For more information, see Repeating a Course and Policy 02.10.12.

Residence Requirement

A minimum of 45 of the last 60 semester hours must be completed in the Fox School of Business and Management at Temple University in order to receive a degree. In addition, a minimum of 50% of the business courses and the majority of the requirements of a major must be completed at Temple University.  For more information, see the Academic Residency Requirements.

Transfer Credits

Business courses taken at colleges or universities which are not members of The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) will be accepted for transfer business credits only if they are equivalent to the following:

ECON 1101Macroeconomic Principles3
ECON 1102Microeconomic Principles3
ACCT 2101Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2102Managerial Accounting3
RMI 2101Introduction to Risk Management3
LGLS 1101Legal Environment of Business3
LGLS 1102Law of Contracts3
MIS 2101Information Systems in Organizations3
STAT 1001Quantitative Methods for Business I3
STAT 1102Quantitative Methods for Business II3
STAT 2103Statistical Business Analytics4

MKTG 2101 and HRM 1101 (formerly Human Resource Administration) will be accepted for transfer if they were taken during the fall 1994 semester or later. HRM 2501 will be accepted for transfer if taken during the spring 2005 semester or later. Specific articulation agreements with local colleges may expand on this list. View current articulation agreements.

Additional business credits are accepted from colleges that are members of the AACSB. It should be understood that it is possible for a student to transfer in a large number of credits which, while accepted by the university, may exceed the maximum number of elective credits applicable to the degree.

Permission to Complete Courses at Another Institution

Consistent with the University Policy students will not receive transfer credit for courses taken at another institution while they are matriculated at Temple University unless prior permission has been obtained. Completed permission forms with supporting documentation should be submitted to the Fox School of Business and Management advising offices. Please refer to the above section on transfer credits. Students should allow approximately two weeks for processing once permission forms and documentation have been submitted. For more information, refer to Permission to Complete a Course at another Institution after Matriculation.

Non-Degree Seeking Student Policy

Students not formally admitted to Temple University may take undergraduate courses numbered under 3000 in the Fox School of Business and Management. Undergraduate courses numbered above 3000 are open to visiting students who have completed a minimum of 60 credits, have met course prerequisites, and have written permission from their home institution. Students who have a baccalaureate degree and the prerequisites for the course desired may also enroll in advanced courses.

College Graduation Requirements

The Fox School of Business & Management offers two undergraduate degrees: a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.). The B.B.A. degree gives students a broad-based education, including foundation and chosen major coursework. The B.S. degree is for those students who wish for more specialized training in the field of Statistical Science and Data Analytics.

Bachelor of Business Administration

The degree of Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) may be conferred upon a student by recommendation of the faculty and upon the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 124 semester hours of credit with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 overall and in the major. A minimum of 124 credit hours will be earned in the following four requirement categories:  

  • University General Education (GenEd) Requirements
  • Fox School of Business & Management lower- and upper-division requirements
  • Major requirements
  • Electives

Students must follow the program requirements in effect at the time the major is declared or changed. Program requirements include both the College Graduation Requirements listed here and the courses required for the major listed in the Programs of Study. Students not continuously enrolled who have not been approved for a Leave of Absence or study elsewhere must follow University requirements current at the time of re-enrollment.

University General Education Curriculum

The General Education curriculum (GenEd) is required for all students. Note that students not continuously enrolled who have not been approved for a Leave of Absence or study elsewhere must follow University requirements current at the time of re-enrollment.

Bachelor of Business Administration Requirements

Lower-Division Foundation Requirements

Note: 1000-level courses are typically taken in freshman year; 2000-level courses are typically taken in sophomore year.

ECON 1101Macroeconomic Principles3
ECON 1102Microeconomic Principles3
HRM 1101Leadership and Organizational Management3
LGLS 1101Legal Environment of Business3
STAT 1001Quantitative Methods for Business I 13
STAT 1102Quantitative Methods for Business II 13
STAT 2103Statistical Business Analytics 24
ACCT 2101Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2102Managerial Accounting 33
MIS 2101Information Systems in Organizations3
MKTG 2101Marketing Management3
BA 2101Professional Development Strategies1
BA 2104Excel for Business Applications1
BA 2196Business Communications3
RMI 2101Introduction to Risk Management3
Total Credit Hours42
1

Higher level courses may be recommended depending on the mathematics placement score or the student's intended major. Actuarial Science majors should refer to the math courses listed under the Actuarial Science major description.

2

Successful completion of this course will waive the General Education Quantitative Literacy requirement

3

Accounting and Entrepreneurship majors must take ACCT 2521 instead of ACCT 2102.

Note: In order to graduate, a grade of C- or better must be obtained in all FSBM lower-division requirements.

Upper-Division Foundation Requirements

Note: 3000-level courses are typically taken in the junior or senior year; 4000-level courses are taken in the senior year.

FIN 3101Financial Management 13
MSOM 3101Operations Management3
BA 3102Business Society and Ethics3
BA 3103Integrative Business Applications3
BA 4101Global Business Policies3
IB 3101Fundamentals of International Business 23
Total Credit Hours18

Note: In order to graduate, a grade of C- or better must be obtained in all FSBM upper-division requirements.

1

Actuarial Science majors must take AS 2503 instead of FIN 3101.

2

Economics majors replace IB 3101 with ECON 3563 or ECON 3564.

Finance and Real Estate majors replace IB 3101 with FIN 3551.

Marketing majors replace IB 3101 with MKTG 3553.

Actuarial Science and Risk Management majors replace IB 3101 with RMI 3567.

IB 3101 is waived for students who major in Accounting and Management Information Systems only if a second major or a minor is not completed.

Consult your academic advisor.

Major Requirements

Major requirements are determined by the effective semester of their declaration and students should declare their majors upon the completion of 60 credits in consultation with their academic advisors. Major requirements include both the College Graduation Requirements listed above and the courses required for the major listed in the Programs of Study.

Bachelor of Business Administration majors are offered in the following programs: Accounting, Actuarial Science, Business Management, Economics, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Management, Finance, Financial Planning, Human Resource Management, International Business, Legal Studies, Management Information Systems, Marketing, Real Estate, Risk Management & Insurance, and Supply Chain Management.

Twenty-one business courses (60 s.h.) are required as part of the lower- and upper-division foundation requirements for the B.B.A. program. In addition, a minimum of six business courses must be completed in the major. In completing the courses in the major, students will become competent in understanding critical business concepts and the practice of ethical decision-making, and demonstrate both effective written and oral communication and the ability to apply critical thinking to business problems. Students who choose to pursue a dual major in business can double-count a maximum of one course toward both majors. All Fox students must take a minimum of two writing-intensive courses at Temple. One of these courses will be BA 2196; the second will be a writing-intensive course in the major.

NOTE: Many upper-division foundation courses and major courses have prerequisites. Some prerequisites also include minimum grade requirements. Students are required to meet all prerequisites. Prerequisites will be strictly enforced and the school reserves the right to de-enroll students from courses when prerequisites have not been met. Course descriptions, including prerequisites, are found in the Bulletin in the Courses tab above.

Electives

Free electives: Students who have satisfied all of the requirements for GenEd, the Fox School Foundation, and the major will need additional credits to achieve the 124 credit minimum required for graduation. These credits may be taken in either business or non-business courses. Students are encouraged to explore completing a minor, a certificate, or a second major for these credits. Students who choose to pursue a dual major in business can double-count a maximum of one course toward both majors. Students who choose to pursue one or more minors may not double-count courses already used to meet the requirements for a major or different minor.

Summary of Graduation Requirements

Credits for B.B.A. Degree
University General Education31
Lower-Division Foundation Requirements42
Upper-Division Foundation Requirements18
Major Requirements18
Electives15
Total Credit Hours124

Bachelor of Science

The degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) may be conferred upon a student by recommendation of the faculty and upon the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 122 semester hours of credit with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 overall and in the major. A minimum of 122 credit hours will be earned in the following four requirement categories:  

  • University General Education (GenEd) Requirements
  • Core requirements
  • Major requirements
  • Electives

Students must follow the program requirements in effect at the time the major is declared or changed. Program requirements include both the College Graduation Requirements listed here and the courses required for the major listed in the Programs of Study. Students not continuously enrolled who have not been approved for a Leave of Absence or study elsewhere must follow University requirements current at the time of re-enrollment.

University General Education Curriculum

The General Education curriculum (GenEd) is required for all students. Note that students not continuously enrolled who have not been approved for a Leave of Absence or study elsewhere must follow University requirements current at the time of re-enrollment.

Bachelor of Science Requirements

Core Requirements

BA 2104Excel for Business Applications1
ECON 1101Macroeconomic Principles3
or ECON 1901 Honors Macroeconomic Principles
ECON 1102Microeconomic Principles3
or ECON 1902 Honors Microeconomic Principles
HRM 1101Leadership and Organizational Management3
or HRM 1901 Honors Leadership and Organizational Management
MATH 1041Calculus I4
or MATH 1941 Honors Calculus I
MATH 1042Calculus II4
or MATH 1942 Honors Calculus II
STAT 2103Statistical Business Analytics4
or STAT 2903 Honors Statistical Business Analytics
ACCT 2101Financial Accounting3
or ACCT 2901 Honors Financial Accounting
BA 2196Business Communications3
or BA 2996 Honors Business Communications
CIS 1051Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming in Python4
CIS 1068Program Design and Abstraction4
MKTG 2101Marketing Management3
or MKTG 2901 Honors Marketing Management
RMI 2101Introduction to Risk Management3
or RMI 2901 Honors Introduction to Risk Management
Total Credit Hours42

Major Requirements

Major requirements are determined by the effective semester of their declaration and students should declare their majors upon the completion of 60 credits in consultation with their academic advisors. Major requirements include both the College Graduation Requirements listed above and the courses required for the major listed in the Programs of Study. The Bachelor of Science major is offered in Statistical Science & Data Analytics. Requirements for the Statistical Science & Data Analytics major are available on the program's page.

NOTE: Many core courses and major courses have prerequisites. Some prerequisites also include minimum grade requirements. Students are required to meet all prerequisites. Prerequisites will be strictly enforced and the school reserves the right to de-enroll students from courses when prerequisites have not been met. Course descriptions, including prerequisites, are found in the Bulletin in the Courses tab above.

Electives

Free electives: Students who have satisfied all of the requirements for GenEd, the core requirements, and the major requirements will need additional credits to achieve the 122 credit minimum required for graduation. These credits may be taken in either business or non-business courses. Students are encouraged to explore completing a minor, a certificate, or a second major for these credits. Students who choose to pursue a dual major in business can double-count a maximum of one course toward both majors. Students who choose to pursue one or more minors may not double-count courses already used to meet the requirements for a major or different minor.

Summary of Graduation Requirements

Credits for B.S. Degree
University General Education31
Core Requirements42
Major Requirements39
Electives10
Total Credit Hours122

Academic Advising

Center for Undergraduate Advising

http://www.fox.temple.edu/cms_academics/dept/advising/

The Center for Undergraduate Advising provides advising at three campuses: Main, Ambler, and Center City (TUCC).

The Main Campus office is open every weekday. The Ambler and Center City offices are open on selected days and evenings. Please see our web site for current office hours.

Our purpose is to provide quality academic advising services that empower students to make informed decisions about their education, projected career, and personal/professional life at Temple University. Students work collaboratively with our academic advising team to develop individual plans for academic success, interpret university policy, fully utilize campus resources, and engage in the process of reflection and decision making that will promote their achievement. 

We have two advising teams dedicated to working with students at each academic level. Freshman/Sophomore Advising focuses on the transition to college life, major exploration within Fox, successful completion of the lower-division foundation requirements, and retention. Junior/Senior Advising focuses on ensuring students are making satisfactory progress in their major, have completed their graduation audit prior to their final semester, and are prepared to graduate. Junior and senior students are assigned a personal advisor based on their declared major.

As active participants in the advising process, students bear the ultimate responsibility for making educational and career decisions. Therefore, we rely on students to be prepared with questions, research options before they come to their meeting, and to refer to their advising notes both before and after advising meetings. Students are expected to know University Policies and their program requirements as defined in their Bulletin and on their DARS report.

Advisors, in turn, strive to provide knowledgeable assistance to ensure students’ accurate understanding of University and School policies, utilization of campus resources, interpretation of curriculum requirements, and timely completion of degree requirements. Students in Fox have several ways to meet with an academic advisor, including Scheduled Appointments for academic planning, Daily Walk-in Advising for quick questions, and Virtual Advising for students unable to come to campus during business hours.

Peer Advising

The Center for Undergraduate Advising is pleased to provide peer advising on Main Campus, comprised of undergraduate peer advisors recruited from among the best and brightest in the Fox School of Business and Management. Peer advisors provide the perspective of an upper-class student and are trained to assist business students to be successful by sharing their knowledge and personal strategies for academic success. For more information, visit Peer Advising.

Office of the Ombudsperson

The Fox School of Business and Management Ombudsperson assists students in Fox to resolve problems and conflicts that might arise from the classroom, acting as mediator between faculty and students while promoting alternatives to more formal processes. The ombudsperson supports effective communication, cooperation, equity, and civility in all academic and scholastic settings. Students who believe they have been treated unfairly in an academic matter should first meet with the appropriate ombudsperson.

For more information, refer to grievance procedures or contact the Center for Undergraduate Advising at foxombud@temple.edu or 215-204-7672 for further information.

Advising Directors

Julian R. White
Director, Center for Undergraduate Advising
Speakman Hall 102
215-204-4558
julian.white@temple.edu

Camille M. Fallon
Associate Director, Freshman/Sophomore Unit
Speakman Hall 104
215-204-1761
camille.fallon@temple.edu

Jennifer VanDeWoestyne
Associate Director, Junior/Senior Unit
Speakman Hall 101
215-204-0923
jennvdw@temple.edu

Elvita Quiñones
Associate Director, Online BBA & Ambler Campus
Speakman Hall 102
215-204-5809 (Main) / 267-468-8350 (Ambler)
elvita.quinones@temple.edu

Faculty

In addition to the faculty list below, refer to the school's faculty directory and staff directory.

Joan Allatta, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Andrew T. Allmond, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.J., Temple University.

Ronald C. Anderson, Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Lynne M. Andersson, Associate Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Paul K. Asabere, Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Hilal Atasoy, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Craig Atwater, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Cynthia R. Axelrod, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Drexel University.

Steven Balsam, Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., City University of New York.

Rajiv Banker, Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; D.B.A., Harvard University.

Sudipta Basu, Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Rochester.

Gary J. Blau, Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.

Misty P. Blessley, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Jeffrey R. Boles, Assistant Professor, Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Edward C. Boyer, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Andrea Brooks Lopez, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Lawrence Brown, Professor (Research), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Rochester.

Francesca Brusa, Assistant Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Oxford University.

Dmitri Byzalov, Assistant Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Dwight Carey, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; B.S., Farleigh Dickinson University at Madison.

Alexandra D. Carides, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Debra Casey, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

Steven J. Casper, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Boyoun Chae, Assistant Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of British Columbia.

Rajeswararao S. Chaganti, Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., State University of New York.

Rajan Chandran, Professor, Department of Dean's Office, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Syracuse University.

Hua Chen, Associate Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Georgia State University.

Peter Chinloy, Professor (Practice), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Pallavi Chitturi, Associate Professor (Research), Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.

J. Jay Choi, Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., New York University.

Teresa Gill Cirillo, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.A., Rowan University.

Shira Cohen, Assistant Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Mary Conran, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Temple University.

J. David Cummins, Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Kathleen A. Davis, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., University of California Berkeley.

John R. Deckop, Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

C. Anthony Di Benedetto, Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., McGill University.

Angelika Dimoka, Associate Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Southern California.

Yuexiao Dong, Assistant Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Martin J. Doyle, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., University of Phoenix.

Rob B. Drennan, Associate Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Leora F. Eisenstadt, Assistant Professor, Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., New York University School of Law.

Eric M. Eisenstein, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Elyas E. Elyasiani, Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Philip English, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of South Carolina.

Paul Evangelista, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Kevin J. Fandl, Assistant Professor, Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., George Mason University.

Susan Feinberg, Associate Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

Stuart H. Fine, Associate Professor (Practice), Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina.

Jennifer M. Fitzgerald, Instructor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Temple University.

Laurie J. Fitzpatrick, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.F.A., Temple University.

Nathan Fong, Assistant Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Tyra L. Ford, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

Jane H. Frankel, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., University of Pennsylvania.

Mary Anne Gaffney, Associate Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Maryland.

Deanna Geddes, Associate Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Purdue University.

Mark E. Gershon, Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Arizona.

Katherine W. Gerst, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Temple University.

Melissa Glenn-Fleming, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.A., La Salle University.

Jing Gong, Assistant Professor, Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University.

Elizabeth A. Gordon, Associate Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Isaac Gottlieb, Professor (Clinical), Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Brad Greenwood, Assistant Professor, Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.

Michael Guglielmo, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Temple University.

Bertrand Guillotin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Grenoble Ecole de Management.

Terry Ann Halbert, Professor, Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., Rutgers University.

Robert D. Hamilton III, Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Xu Han, Assistant Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Crystal M. Harold, Associate Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., George Mason University.

Roie Hauser, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Richard M. Heiberger, Professor Emeritus, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Theodore L. Hill III, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Arthur Hochner, Associate Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Samuel D. Hodge Jr., Professor, Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., Temple University.

Brian C. Holtz, Assistant Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., George Mason University.

Forrest E. Huffman, Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of South Carolina.

James M. Hunt, Associate Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.

Daniel Isaacs, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., Brooklyn Law School.

Alan J. Izenman, Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Cheng (Jason) Jiang, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of California Riverside.

Kose John, Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Florida.

David E. Jones, Associate Professor (Practice), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.

Darin Kapanjie, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ed.D., Temple University.

Satyajit Karnik, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Howard Keen, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College.

You Jin Kim, Assistant Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Harold E. Klein, Associate Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Masaaki (Mike) Kotabe, Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

A. J. Kreimer, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Temple University.

Jagannathan Krishnan, Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Jayanthi Krishnan, Associate Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

James M. Lammendola, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., University of Tulsa College of Law.

Richard A. Lancioni, Professor Emeritus, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Amy Lavin, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Temple University.

Vanessa J. Lawrence, Associate Professor, Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., University of Pennsylvania School of Law.

Xi Li, Assistant Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., London Business School.

Yan Li, Assistant Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Yuanzhi (Lily) Li, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., New York University.

Yi Liang, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University.

Diane S. Luedtke, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.A., University of Pennsylvania.

Xueming Luo, Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; D.B.A., Louisiana Tech University.

Marco J. Malandra, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., Golden Gate University.

Barbara B. Manaka, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Munir Y. Mandviwalla, Associate Professor, Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University.

Connie Xiangdong Mao, Associate Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Elizabeth G. Matthew, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.A., The Pennsylvania State University.

John A. McClendon, Associate Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of South Carolina.

Michael McCloskey, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Drexel University.

Robert C. McNamee, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

James P. Miller, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University College Cork.

Laurel Miller, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., Temple University.

Martina Mincheva, Assistant Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Neha Mittal, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Thorsten P. Moenig, Assistant Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Georgia State University.

Christopher Monos, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Christopher Moore, Instructor (Practice), Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., University of Akron.

Maureen (Mimi) Morrin, Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., New York University.

Michael Moughan, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Delaware.

James C. Moustafellos, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; M.Arch., Princeton University.

Shreeram R. Mudambi, Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Susan Mudambi, Associate Professor (Research), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Warwick.

Subhadeep Mukhopadhyay, Assistant Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

David Nash, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., University of Pennsylvania.

Lalitha Naveen, Associate Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Arizona State University.

Katherine A. Nelson, Instructor (Practice), Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; B.A., College of Mount Saint Vincent.

Cory Ng, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., Drexel University.

E. Carey O'Donnell, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; B.A., Colgate University.

In-Sue Oh, Associate Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Christina M. Owings, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.Ed., Lesley College.

Bora Ozkan, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of New Orleans.

Min-Seok Pang, Assistant Professor, Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Arvind Parkhe, Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Paul Pavlou, Professor, Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Southern California.

Tony Petrucci, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Regent University.

M. Moshe Porat, Professor, Department of Dean's Office, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

James D. Portwood, Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Robert S. Pred, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.

Eric G. Press, Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Oregon.

Bruce B. Rader, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Houston.

Crystal Reeck, Assistant Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Duke University.

Laureen Regan, Associate Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Charlotte R. Ren, Associate Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Sheri Risler, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; B.S., Boston University.

Michael J. Rivera, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Purdue University.

Edward C. Rosenthal, Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

David H. Ryan, Associate Professor, Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of South Carolina.

Oleg Rytchkov, Assistant Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sanat K. Sarkar, Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Calcutta University.

Pavel G. Savor, Associate Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Stuart M. Schmidt, Professor, Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

David Schuff, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Arizona State University.

Jonathan A. Scott, Professor, Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Purdue University.

Anthony Louis Seeton, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Temple University.

Jeremy J. Shafer, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., Temple University.

Tianxiang Shi, Assistant Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Waterloo.

Amir Shoham, Associate Professor (Research), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

Jagbir Singh, Professor Emeritus, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Florida State University.

Indrajit Sinha, Associate Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

S. J. Sklar, Assistant Professor, Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., Temple University.

Michael F. Smith, Associate Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; D.B.A., Indiana University.

Marcus J. Sobel, Associate Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

John A. Soss, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Finance, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Lauren N. Spirko, Instructor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., Temple University.

Alexander Stein, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Roman S. Szewczuk, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., La Salle University.

Chung (Jennifer) Won Tae, Assistant Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., London School of Business.

Vivek Tandon, Assistant Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Cheng Yong Tang, Associate Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Michael Valenza, Associate Professor, Department of Legal Studies, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., Temple University.

Vinod Venkatraman, Assistant Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Duke University.

Krupa S. Viswanathan, Associate Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Kathleen Voss, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Human Resource Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.S., University of Pittsburgh.

Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor, Department of Management Information Systems, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University.

Ellen Weber, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; B.S., University of Pennsylvania.

William W. S. Wei, Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Howard J. Weiss, Professor, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Mary A. Weiss, Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Guntram Werther, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Washington University.

Jean K. Wilcox, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Storm Wilkins, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Sheryl Winston Smith, Assistant Professor, Department of Strategic Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Jacqueline Volkman Wise, Assistant Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Christian E. Wurst, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Accounting, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Temple University.

Zhigen Zhao, Assistant Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Jacqueline S. Zinn, Professor, Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Rebecca Anne Zinn, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Fox School of Business and Management; M.B.A., Temple University.

M. Michael Zuckerman, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, Fox School of Business and Management; J.D., John Marshall Law School.