College of Liberal Arts

Founded 1884
 

Office of the Dean
liberalarts.temple.edu

12th Floor, Anderson Hall
1114 W. Polett Walk

TBD
Dean

Rebecca T. Alpert, Ph.D
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
215-204-7712
rebecca.alpert@temple.edu

Annette McMenamin Bakley, Ed.D.
Senior Vice Dean
215-204-3625
amb@temple.edu

Amanda Gibson, M.A.  
Assistant Director, Undergraduate Affairs
Grievance Officer
215-204-8504
gibson@temple.edu

Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development
liberalarts.temple.edu/advising

1810 Liacouras Walk, Third Floor
215-204-7971
claaac@temple.edu

Christopher Wolfgang, M.A.
Director
cwolfgan@temple.edu

Anar Khandvala, M.Ed.
Associate Director
anar@temple.edu

Introduction

Given the current pace of social and technological change in the world community, a firm grounding in the liberal arts is essential to one's prospects for success. Although recent trends in higher education highlight the proliferation of job-specific training, a well-rounded, liberal arts education is more relevant now than ever before. While highly specialized training and knowledge may prove helpful in landing one's first job, those who will build successful careers and lead us into the future will have a much broader, more transferable set of skills. Our graduates will be able to think critically while analyzing complex issues and developing creative solutions to problems that we have not yet imagined. The written and oral communication skills honed by a liberal arts program will allow our graduates to communicate their ideas concisely and effectively to both specialized and lay audiences. Working across disciplines to evaluate ideas and arguments throughout their college career, liberal arts graduates develop the technological and cultural literacy necessary to thrive in the global marketplace. In short, our leaders of the future will possess the skills and attributes that have long defined a liberal arts education.

In the College of Liberal Arts, our students learn how  to learn by exploring a rich diversity of rigorous coursework in the humanities and social sciences, including anthropology, English, history, philosophy, sociology, religion, psychology and foreign languages. Many of our courses are taught in intimate, seminar-style settings that encourage students to engage our world-class faculty in meaningful discourse that expands world views and enhances analytical reasoning skills. Equally important is the flexibility afforded students within the liberal arts curriculum, which provides them with myriad opportunities to supplement their classroom education in meaningful ways by participating in study abroad programs, engaging in directed research, pursuing original scholarship through independent studies, and gaining valuable professional experience in internship programs. Taken together, these liberal arts experiences not only prepare students for rewarding careers, but for fulfilling lives as informed and engaged citizens of the world. 

Accreditation

Departments and programs at Temple University are accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (www.msche.org). Individual departments and programs may carry additional accreditation by the official accreditation body for that discipline. 

Special Programs 

Professional Development

1810 Liacouras Walk, Suite 301
(215) 204-7971

Anne Bayless, Associate Director
abayless@temple.edu

Patrick Gordon, Senior Professional Development Advisor
pgordon@temple.edu

Elizabeth Anselmo, Professional Development Advisor
elizabeth.anselmo@temple.edu

Given the rapidly-changing nature of the world economy, a degree in the liberal arts has never been more valuable. Our professional development advisors teach students in the liberal arts how they can best leverage their skills to prepare for careers in a broad array of industries, including government, non-profit, corporate, education, etc. We are committed to enhancing students' professionalism and empowering students to present themselves successfully as candidates for internships and employment opportunities. We also work with students interested in preparing for graduate or professional school.

We provide an array of services to students in the College of Liberal Arts, including one-on-one appointments with a Professional Development Advisor to discuss internship, jobs, and/or graduate school by calling or stopping by the College of Liberal Arts Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development. Advisors can help with:

  • Drafting and editing resumes
  • Writing and revising cover letters
  • Practicing interview skills
  • Strategizing on internships and job opportunities search
  • Building a personal brand
  • Connecting a student's unique experience with potential employers

In addition to working individually with students, our professional development advisors collaborate with faculty, administrators, and prospective employers to coordinate and host a number of career-related workshops and events, including:

  • Internship information sessions
  • Graduate School 101
  • Career fairs and employer visits in partnership with the university Career Center
  • Skill-building training workshops
  • Alumni networking events
Affiliated Academic Courses

CLA 1002 Professional Development for Liberal Arts Majors (1 s.h.): Designed to guide students as they explore the transferability of the skills they have acquired in the liberal arts with an emphasis on the value of those skills in the marketplace. Students will learn how to search effectively for internship and career opportunities, communicate professionally, develop an application-ready résumé and prepare for networking and professional interviews.

CLA 2685 Internship (1 to 12 s.h.): Provides students with the opportunity to complete an internship for upper-level elective credit in the College of Liberal Arts. Interested students should meet with a professional development advisor and complete an internship contract.

First-Year Writing Program

www.cla.temple.edu/english/fywp/

1046 Anderson Hall

Shannon Walters, Director
215-204-1820
skw145@temple.edu

Rachael Groner, Associate Director
215-204-2212
rgroner@temple.edu

First-Year Writing includes two 4-credit courses, ENG 0701 Introduction to Academic Discourse and ENG 0802 Analytical Reading and Writing. First-Year Writing also includes ENG 0711 and ENG 0812, which are alternative versions of ENG 0701 and ENG 0802 (respectively) designated especially for English as a Second Language (ESL) students. The ESL sections of all of our courses are equivalent in weight and credit to their direct counterparts.

Entering students are either placed into the 0701-0802 sequence, placed into 0802 only, or exempted from these courses entirely. Placement is based on the SAT/ACT score and or a placement assessment. 

If a student places into ENG 0701/ENG 0711, he or she may not enroll in ENG 0802/ENG 0812 until the first course is completed successfully, with a grade of C- or better. ENG 0802/ENG 0812 may not be taken for credit by students who have successfully completed ENG 0902 Honors Literature/Reading/Writing.

ENG 0802/ENG 0812 is a required course in the General Education program. Students are strongly advised to successfully complete this course before taking the Intellectual Heritage sequence IH 0851 and IH 0852, any upper-level course in the College of Liberal Arts (all courses numbered 2000-4999), and all Writing Intensive courses (course numbers ending in -96, -97, and -98).

Students are advised to take the required three-course sequence of Analytical Reading and Writing, Mosaic I, and Mosaic II (IH 0851 and IH 0852) in order and in successive semesters. 

Intellectual Heritage Program (Mosaic Humanities Seminars I & II)

www.cla.temple.edu/ih/

https://gened.temple.edu/students/courses/mosaic/

214 Anderson Hall

Daniel Berman, Director
dwberman@temple.edu

Douglas Greenfield, Associate Director
dmg33@temple.edu

Emily Carlin, Administrator
215-204-3177
ecarlin@temple.edu

The Intellectual Heritage Program offers a two-course sequence, IH 0851 Mosaic: Humanities Seminar I and IH 0852 Mosaic: Humanities Seminar II, which is part of the university General Education curriculum. Engaging with some of the rich, complex, and historically-significant texts that have shaped our culture, students build strong communication skills and intellectual curiosity. Students become familiar with some of the key concepts and moments in Western and other intellectual traditions.

Students are required to complete both courses in the General Education Curriculum. Transfer students should see their academic advisor for more information regarding their IH placement. Satisfactory completion of ENG 0802 is strongly advised prior to taking the Mosaic sequence. Honors versions of the Mosaic sequence are offered as IH 0951 Honors Mosaic: Humanities Seminar I and IH 0952 Honors Mosaic: Humanities Seminar II

Study Abroad

Undergraduates majoring in any liberal arts discipline may pursue a large variety of study abroad options. Temple University has campuses in Rome, Italy, and Tokyo, Japan. We offer programs in London, England, Oviedo, Spain, and exchange programs with universities in England, Germany, and Puerto Rico. Summer programs are offered in a number of countries, such as France, Germany, Ghana, Great Britain, India, Italy, Japan, and South Africa. In addition, CLA undergraduates can choose to study in non-Temple programs around the world. 

Several advisors in CLA specialize in assisting students in planning their curriculum to take advantage of the study abroad option(s): Abby Cohen, Nicole Conley, Beth Lawson, Dina Maslennikova, Jocelyn Tutrani, and Melissa Valdes. Students are urged to see an advisor about one year prior to their anticipated study abroad semester to determine their academic plan.

See the Office of Education Abroad and Overseas Campuses, 200 Tuttleman Learning Center or http://studyabroad.temple.edu/ for more information about study abroad options. 

University Honors Program

The College of Liberal Arts participates in the university-wide honors program. Go to the University Honors Program section in this Bulletin for more information.  

Departmental Honors Programs

Several departments in the College of Liberal Arts offer an Honors track for their majors. Students should consult the Bulletin information listed under the individual majors for eligibility, specific program requirements, and contacts. 

Five Year BA/MA 4+1 Programs

Some departments in the College of Liberal Arts offer their high-achieving majors the opportunity to apply to their Master of Arts degree program during their junior year. Students admitted into these programs typically take up to 12 graduate credits that count towards both the BA and the MA degrees, leaving only one year of additional coursework beyond the BA to complete the MA program. In addition, students are not required to take the Graduate Record Examination, the standardized test most students take to gain entry to graduate school. The departments offering this option are: Criminal Justice, Economics, English, and Psychology. For more information on this program, consult your faculty advisor. 

Temple Law Scholars Program

Paul Crowe, Director
7th floor Anderson Hall
215-204-8591
pcrowe@temple.edu

The Temple Law Scholars Program provides an opportunity for outstanding students to gain provisional admission to the Temple University Beasley School of Law at the same time they are accepted into the College of Liberal Arts. As Temple Law Scholars, students spend their undergraduate years in Temple's Honors Program, after which they enroll in the Beasley School of Law, leading to the JD degree. Scholars will take advantage of special opportunities, including internships, mock trial competitions, attendance at special events and lectures, and sitting in on law school classes.

The Temple Law Scholars Program is highly selective. To be considered, applicants must be accepted into the Honors Program. High class standing, high SAT scores, and superior letters of recommendation are expected, as is an articulate, thoughtful essay. In addition, other criteria used in the decision-making process include above-average maturity, community service, leadership, and a genuine commitment to the legal profession and service to others.

Application to the Temple Law Scholars Program takes place at the same time students apply to the College of Liberal Arts. The application materials include the Temple undergraduate admission application, the Temple Law Scholars application, a letter of recommendation, and an essay on a topic assigned by the Temple Law Scholars admissions committee. An interview may also be required. The deadline for receipt of all application materials is April 1. Applications received before March 1 will receive priority treatment.

Honor Societies and Awards for Achievement

Awards

During the graduation season in May, the Baccalaureate Awards Ceremony is held to honor seniors who have demonstrated outstanding academic performance and/or exceptional service to the college. Junior scholarship recipients are recognized at an annual event in the fall. These prizes are awarded competitively and are a testament to the excellence of the College of Liberal Arts undergraduates. For more information on awards offered for particular majors, see liberalarts.temple.edu/about-us/resources/undergraduate-resources, the web site for your department, or ask your faculty advisor about the awards nomination process.

Phi Beta Kappa

See the Honor Societies section of the Undergraduate Bulletin.

Student Association Information

Majors' Associations

Most of the departments in the College of Liberal Arts support student interest groups, clubs, and majors' associations. These organizations provide opportunities for students from the individual disciplines of the liberal arts to meet one another and to extend the learning experience beyond the classroom. Some of these associations invite their alumni back to campus to connect with current undergraduates and talk with them about the wide range of career options open to liberal arts graduates.

Participation in the majors' associations has significant benefits. Active involvement cultivates skills in leadership, team work, cultural sensitivity, and public speaking, all of which are highly valued in the workplace. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in these organizations. For more information, see your department's website or faculty advisor.

Special Facilities

College of Liberal Arts - Information Technology (CLA IT)

The College of Liberal Arts offers cutting-edge technology and resources for students, faculty and staff. Our IT staff manages over 100 technology-enabled smart classrooms, more than 560 computer stations in both laboratory, kiosk, and classroom settings, in addition to a wireless network with 100% coverage in all CLA spaces. 

www.cla.temple.edu/it/

Anderson Hall, Room 21
215-204-3213

Marc Getty, Director of Information Technology
marc.getty@temple.edu
215-962-5603

Rodney Holloway, Evening Manager, Computer Labs
R.T.Holloway@temple.edu

Crystal Schulz, Daytime Manager, Computer Labs
crystal.schulz@temple.edu

Computer Labs and Computer Classrooms

CLA IT maintains 11 computer classrooms ranging in size from 14 to 70 seats, plus a 100 seat public drop-in lab located in Anderson 21. For complete details, see www.cla.temple.edu/it/labs/.

Hours of Operation:

Fall/Spring Semesters and Study/Exam Days:  All facilities are open 7:30 AM to 9:00 PM Monday through Thursday and until 7:00 PM on Friday.

Summer Sessions, Spring Break, and Winter Break: All facilities are open 8:00 AM to 6:30 PM Monday through Thursday and 8:00 AM to 5:30 PM on Friday.

Student Contact Information

On the department or academic program pages within this Bulletin, students will find contact information for departmental representatives (department chairs, undergraduate advisors, etc.)  Other faculty contact information is available using the Cherry and White directory https://directory.temple.edu/ or by visiting the departmental web sites, located at the College of Liberal Arts home page: http://liberalarts.temple.edu/.

Faculty members keep regular office hours each semester, which are posted on syllabi and in the department offices.

Academic Policies & Regulations

University policies and regulations generally apply to all undergraduate students and provide a framework within which schools and colleges may specify further conditions or variations appropriate to students in their courses or programs.

Academic Residency Requirements

Upon transferring into the College of Liberal Arts, all students must complete at least 30 credits of coursework as a degree-seeking student, completing at least half of the courses required for any major, minor, or certificate program at Temple University.

In order to be considered for Latin honors (cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude), a student must complete a minimum of 60 credits at Temple University and meet the GPA requirements as set out in the University policy.

Change of Program

Students who wish to complete a Change of Program (COP) into the College of Liberal Arts from other colleges and schools at Temple must have at least a 2.0 GPA in the intended major and overall. Students will not be permitted to COP as undeclared majors if they have completed, or are in the process of completing, 60 or more credits.

Course Levels

All College of Liberal Arts undergraduate courses are open to all students who have successfully completed appropriate course prerequisites and are divided into four categories:

  • Preparatory courses numbered 0700-0799.
  • General Education courses numbered 0800-0999.
  • Lower-level courses numbered 1000-1999.
  • Upper-level courses numbered 2000-4999.

Courses Taken at Other Institutions

Degree-seeking Temple students must always petition for the prior approval of their dean or dean's designee to take courses at another institution. (Refer to Permission to Complete a Course at Another Institution after Matriculation.) Petitions are available in the College of Liberal Arts Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development.

Dean's List

Each fall and spring semester, those undergraduates who have met the credit hour and academic criteria for their school or college are placed on the Dean's List. See the Dean's List policy for specific GPA and credit-hour requirements.

Declaration of Major

Students in the College of Liberal Arts must declare their major before completing 60 credits, including credits transferred from other institutions. Undeclared students with 45 or more credits are required to meet with an advisor in the Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development before registering.

Foreign Language Course Placement Policy

Students who have studied a foreign language in the four years prior to admission to Temple must take a placement exam if they wish to continue in that language. If a period of more than four years has elapsed between a student's graduation from high school and admission to college, s/he is eligible to enroll in the first level of the language s/he studied in high school.

If a student enrolls in a course level lower than the placement score indicates, s/he will not receive graduation credit for the course or will be dropped from the course by the College of Liberal Arts. If a student wishes to receive credit for a course lower than that indicated by the placement exam, s/he must receive permission from the department chair or program coordinator for that language.

Heritage speakers (also known as native speakers) of a foreign language taught by Temple University must meet with the language program coordinator or department chairperson to assess their readiness and course placement in the language skills sequence. Students will not receive credit for courses lower than their placement indicates. A student with pre-existing language skills (family background, travel or study in a foreign country, participation in non-credit summer language institutes, etc.) who then enrolls in lower division courses in that same language will not receive graduation credit for the course and may be dropped from the course by the College of Liberal Arts.

Foreign Language Regression in Coursework Policy

  • Students who have completed 4000 level coursework may enroll in courses at the 3000 level, but not at the 1000 or 2000 level.
  • Students who have completed the 3000 level may enroll in courses at the 2000 level, but not at the 1000 level.
  • Students who have completed a 2000 level course may not enroll at the 1000 level.
  • General Education courses at the 0800 and 0900 levels are not language skills courses and are open to all students.

If a student seeks permission for an exception to the Regression policy, he or she should discuss the request with the program coordinator for the language.

Intra-University Transfer

See "Change of Program" above.

Graduation Application Process

During the semester immediately prior to the semester in which students will complete their degree requirements, they must apply for graduation by completing the on-line graduation application available through Self Service Banner. Students planning to graduate in August or January must apply by April 1 and students planning to graduate in May must apply by November 1.

All applications received by the deadlines noted above will be reviewed by academic advisors in advance of the next semester and students will be notified of any necessary schedule revisions to fulfill remaining requirements.

Students are responsible for ensuring their intended graduation date is up-to-date by contacting their advisor.

Placement Assessments

All incoming freshmen are placed into English, Mathematics, and foreign language classes according to their SAT/ACT score and/or diagnostic tests.

Transfer students who have not completed the equivalent of ENG 0802 or a college-level math will receive placement in these subjects once they have completed diagnostic assessments.

Students placed into ENG 0701/ENG 0711 must register each semester for that course until the requirement is completed. Only upon successful completion of ENG 0701/ENG 0711 can such students enroll in ENG 0802/ENG 0812. Students assigned to courses designed to remedy deficiencies in mathematics are required to complete those courses (MATH 0701 or MATH 0702) before enrolling in the mathematics component of the University General Education Program (GenEd). Incoming students must also take a foreign language placement examination if they plan to continue a language previously studied or if they wish to place out of the foreign language requirement.

Plagiarism & Academic Cheating

Plagiarism and academic cheating are unacceptable in College of Liberal Arts courses. The development of independent thought and a respect for the thoughts of others is essential to intellectual growth. The penalty for plagiarism or cheating as a first offense is normally an F in the course in which the offense is committed. In such cases, the instructor will write a report to the dean. The CLA Grievance Committee will adjudicate appeals made by students and serious cases, or repeat offenses, referred to the committee by an instructor or the dean. The dean may recommend suspension or expulsion from the university when warranted. Instructors may also refer the offense to the University Disciplinary Committee (UDC) for adjudication.

The prohibition against plagiarism and cheating is intended to foster this independence and respect. For more information, see Academic Honesty under Student Responsibilities.

Standing - Academic Warning, Probation, Dismissal, & Reinstatement

To maintain academic good standing in the university, a student enrolled in an associate or baccalaureate degree-seeking program must achieve both a semester grade point average and a cumulative grade point average of at least a 2.0. See the University policy on Academic Standing for details on academic warning, academic probation, academic dismissal and reinstatement. There is a related policy on Academic Forgiveness.

Withdrawal from Classes

During the first two weeks of the fall or spring semester or summer sessions, students may drop one or more courses with no record of the class appearing on the transcript. In weeks three through nine of the fall or spring semester, or during weeks three and four of the summer sessions, students may withdraw with the assistance of an academic advisor--or by using the withdrawal function in Self-Service Banner (SSB). Instructors' signatures are not required to withdraw. The course will be recorded on the transcript with the notation of "W," indicating that the student withdrew. After week nine of the fall or spring semester, or week four of summer sessions, students may not withdraw from courses.

For the complete policy, please refer to the Academic Policies section of this Bulletin.

Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree

Credit Hour Requirements

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in the College of Liberal Arts require a minimum of 123 credits, distributed according to the university and college policy outlined below, with at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA). A minimum 2.0 GPA must also be maintained in College of Liberal Arts and College of Science and Technology (hereafter "CLA/CST") coursework and in the major.

To earn a CLA baccalaureate degree, a student must complete a minimum of 123 credits, including: 90 credits in CLA/CST courses, 45 credits of which must be at the upper level (numbered 2000-4999). Of that, 6 credits must be outside the student's major division (e.g. Social Sciences or Humanities).

A maximum of 9 credits of Independent Study can be applied to the Bachelor's degree.  This does not include internship, externship, or research credits.

Degree Eligibility

The College of Liberal Arts does not award baccalaureate degrees to students who have already completed an accredited first Bachelor's, Master's, or Ph.D. degree, regardless of when the degree was completed. 

University Requirements

All students entering an undergraduate degree program are required to complete the university General Education (GenEd) curriculum.

All students must take a minimum of two writing-intensive courses at Temple University as designated by their major requirements. The specific writing-intensive courses required for each major are listed on the individual program pages and are identified by "WI."

Foreign Language/Global Studies Requirement for Bachelor of Arts Students

NOTE: This is *not* required for students majoring in the Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience: Systems, Behavior, & Plasticity program.

  1. All B.A. students complete the second level of a foreign language;
  2. All B.A. students must complete at least one course from the GenEd Global/World Society category; and
  3. All B.A. students must complete one of the following options:
  • Third level of a foreign language;
  • Demonstrated proficiency in a foreign language;
  • A second General Education Global/World Society course;
  • Study Abroad at an approved program; or
  • Take one Global Studies course from the following list:
ANTH 2361Peoples of Latin America3
ANTH 2362Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean3
ANTH 2364People and Culture of the Middle East3
ANTH 2374The Anthropology of Modern China3
ASST 2021Japanese Literature in Film3
ASST 2501Introduction to East Asia: China3
ASST 2502Introduction to East Asia: Japan3
ASST 2503Introduction to Southeast Asia: Insular3
ASST 2504Introduction to Southeast Asia: Mainland3
CHI 2011Pre-Modern Chinese Literature3
ENG 2601Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures3
ENG 2712International Film3
ENG 3112Masterpieces of European Drama3
GUS 2032Urban Systems in a Global Economy3
GUS 2073African Development3
GUS 3073Geography of Travel and Tourism3
GUS 3097Environment & Development3
GRC 1004Introduction to the Ancient City3
GRC 2002Gender in Classical Antiquity3
GRC 2101The Greeks3
GRC 2102The Romans3
HEBR 3711Israelis and Palestinians3
HIST 1501Third World History3
HIST 1702World History Modern3
HIST 230420th Century Europe: A Continent in Crisis3
HIST 2702Imperialism, Race, and Empire3
ITAL 2221Italian Culture through Film3
ITAL 3201Italian Culture and Civilization3
ITAL 3240Topics in Italian Cinema and Literature3
JPNS 2012Modern and Contemporary Japanese Literature in Translation3
JPNS 2021Japanese Literature in Film3
JPNS 2096Japanese Popular Culture and Literature3
LAS 1001Perspectives on Latin America3
LAS 2232Politics of Development in Latin America3
POLS 1201Foreign Governments and Politics3
POLS 1301International Politics3
REL 2002Religion and Human Sexuality East & West3
REL 2606Introduction to Islam3
REL 3001Earth Ethics3
RUS 1201Russian Culture3
SOC 3219Globalization: Causes, Promises and Discontents3
SOC 3221Global Development3
SOC 3511Environmental Sociology: The End of the World as We Know It?3

(Please note: The Foreign Language/Global Studies requirement does not pertain to students pursuing the B.S. in Neuroscience. Neuroscience majors under the GenEd program must complete one Global/World Society course.) 

Major

Students must also complete the requirements of a major. The minimum acceptable grade in a course taken to fulfill major requirements is a "C-," though students need a 2.0 GPA overall in major coursework in order to graduate. At least half of the coursework required for a major must be taken at Temple University. 

Students are permitted to double-major (both inside CLA and across schools and colleges) but Temple University does not permit transcription of a third major. 

Students are encouraged to declare their major as soon as possible, and university policy requires that a major must be declared by the time a student has earned 60 credits.

Major requirements are determined by the effective semester of their declaration. The Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development is responsible for making this assignment and informs the student via e-mail.

Students who wish to declare or change their major or minor should consult the Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development at 1810 Liacouras Walk, Suite 301.

B.A. and B.S. majors are offered in the divisions of the Humanities and the Social Sciences.

  • Humanities: English, French, German, Greek and Roman Classics, Italian, Japanese (only available at our Japan campus), Philosophy, Religion, and Spanish (includes tracks in Language, Literature and Linguistics; Professional Studies; and Education)
  • Social Sciences: Africology and African American Studies, American Studies, Anthropology (includes tracks in Human Biology and Visual Anthropology), Asian Studies, Criminal Justice, Economics, Environmental Studies, Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies, Geography and Urban Studies, Global Studies, History, Jewish Studies, Latin American Studies, Mathematical Economics, Neuroscience: Systems, Behavior and Plasticity (B.S.), Political Science, Psychology,  and Sociology (includes track in Sociology of Health)

Upper-level Distribution Requirements

All B.A. and B.S. students in the College of Liberal Arts must complete upper-level distribution requirements by taking two upper-level (numbered 2000-4999) CLA courses outside the curriculum division of the major (or upper-level College of Science and Technology courses) as stated above. Students who have double majors in two different divisions automatically satisfy the distribution requirement.

Note: The Humanities Division has been expanded to include upper-level courses in Art History from the Tyler School of Art.

Professional Development Requirement

All students in the College of Liberal Arts are required to take a 1 credit seminar in professional development. CLA 1002 Professional Development for Liberal Arts Majors is the appropriate course option for this major. Other courses that fulfill this requirement are ENG 1801 Career Seminar and PSY 1002 Careers in Psychology.

Military Science Courses

Undergraduate students in the College of Liberal Arts whose degree programs allow for free electives may apply up to 12 credits of military science courses at the 3000 and 4000 levels in Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC), Military Science (Army ROTC), and Naval Science (Navy ROTC).

Courses Inapplicable to Graduation

Students will not receive credits for lower-level courses after successful completion of higher-level courses in sequenced courses of study. This only applies to the First Year Writing sequence in English (0701-0802), and all courses in Mathematics and Foreign Languages. For example, after passing a SPAN 1002 course, a student will not receive credits for SPAN 1001

Credit/No Credit

During the junior and senior years, any College of Liberal Arts student who is in good standing and taking a minimum of 12 semester hours may elect to take one course each semester on a Credit/No Credit basis, except for courses that count toward major, minor, GenEd, or distributional requirements. Application must be made at the Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development during the first two weeks of a fall or spring semester course and during the first three days of a first or second summer session course. 

Special Major & Minor Requirements

Interdisciplinary Major

Rather than major in an existing department or program, students may apply for a major in Interdisciplinary Studies. The proposed major should consist of coursework totaling at least 36 semester hours and be justified in terms of some thematic unit of cohesive rationale. The program must not closely resemble any major currently available in the College of Liberal Arts.

The proposed major program may include courses outside of the College of Liberal Arts, but at least 24 semester hours must be in upper-level liberal arts or science courses. The student's proposal must be sponsored by two faculty members from different departments, at least one of whom must be in the College of Liberal Arts. Approval for the program must be obtained from the College of Liberal Arts' Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development prior to the initiation of the last 60 semester hours of the degree.

Honors Interdisciplinary Major

Students in the University Honors Program may apply for a College of Liberal Arts Honors Interdisciplinary Major. They must complete the degree requirements of the B.A. in the College of Liberal Arts and the requirements for the Interdisciplinary Major described above as well as the requirements for the University Honors Program. Approval for this program must also be obtained from the University Honors Committee prior to the initiation of the last 60 semester hours of the degree.

In addition, the proposed major program should include submission of an acceptable honors thesis to the University Honors Oversight Committee.

Minor

Students may also choose to complete the requirements for a minor. The minimum acceptable grade in a course taken to fulfill minor requirements is "C-," though students need a 2.0 GPA in the minor in order to have it awarded at graduation. At least half of the courses taken by a student to fulfill the minor must be taken at Temple. Students may declare a minor at the Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development, 1810 Liacouras Walk, Suite 301. The College of Liberal Arts offers minors in:

  • Africology and African American Studies
  • American Studies
  • Ancient Mediterranean Studies (see Classics)
  • Anthropology (General)
  • Anthropology (Visual)
  • Arabic
  • Asian-American Studies
  • Asian Studies
  • Chinese
  • Classics
  • Clinical and Health Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience (see Psychology)
  • Criminal Justice
  • Economics
  • English
  • Environmental Studies
  • French
  • Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
  • Geography and Urban Studies
  • German
  • Global Studies
  • History
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Jewish Studies
  • Latin American Studies
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT)
  • Neuroscience Research
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Portuguese
  • Psychology
  • Religion
  • Sociology
  • Sociology of Health
  • Spanish

Certificates of Specialization

Students may choose to complete the requirements for an additional certificate of specialization. At least half of the courses taken by a student to fulfill a certificate of specialization must be taken at Temple. Students may declare a certificate in the Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development, 1810 Liacouras Walk, Suite 301. Certificates of specialization are available in the following programs:

  • Asian Business and Society (see Asian Studies)
  • Foreign Languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish (see departments)
  • Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies
  • Geographic Information Systems (see Geography and Urban Studies)
  • Health Research (see Sociology)
  • Jewish Secular Studies (see Jewish Studies)
  • Latin American Studies Semester (see Spanish)
  • Management Career (see Economics)
  • Political Economy (see Economics and Political Science)
  • Spanish and Latin American Studies for Business (see Spanish)
  • Spanish and Latino Studies for the Health and Human Services Professions (see Spanish)
  • Writing (see English)

Academic Advising

Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development
1810 Liacouras Walk, Suite 301
215-204-7971
claaac@temple.edu

liberalarts.temple.edu/advising

The Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development in the College of Liberal Arts helps students plan curricula, choose majors, make vocational and post-graduate plans, and resolve a variety of academic matters. Services are provided by a staff of full-time professional advisors. The Center informs students about the results of placement testing and assignment into corresponding courses. Monitoring of academic progress and graduation clearance is also the responsibility of the Advising Center. Through individual appointments and group workshops, the Center offers the following services:

  • New Student Orientation.
  • Advising and registration assistance for all students in the College of Liberal Arts. Students enrolled in the University Honors Program also receive advising in the Honors Program Office in Tuttleman Learning Center, Suite 201. Students are strongly encouraged to seek faculty advising in their major department.
  • It is recommended, and in some cases required, that students consult with an advisor prior to registration. The advisor will review the proposed coursework and inform students of the requirements for graduation. In addition, the advisor helps students achieve breadth in their curriculum and provides other needed assistance.
  • Academic advising provides an opportunity for students to develop a meaningful education plan compatible with their life goals. Students can also meet with advisors to discuss a variety of academic concerns and identify solutions. Students on academic probation or experiencing academic difficulty work with advisors to learn strategies for overcoming the obstacles to success.
  • Change of Program (COP) advising for students transferring into the College of Liberal Arts from other schools and colleges within Temple. Students seeking to declare their primary major in the College of Liberal Arts must contact the CLA Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development to be added to a "Change of Program" Blackboard course which covers important information about academic advising and degree requirements. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive a Change of Program form in order to finalize the process.

All academic advisors are trained to evaluate information carefully to give students the best possible advice. Primary responsibility for course selection and degree completion rests with the student. Every student must be aware of the requirements of his or her degree and should collaborate with an advisor regularly to ensure timely completion of his or her program.

Department-Based Advisors

All departments in the College of Liberal Arts have designated faculty advisors, undergraduate chairs, or embedded professional advisors, with whom students can discuss the requirements of their major, minor, and/or certificate programs.

Student Grievance Procedures

Title IX of the Educational Amendments Act of 1972 requires that each college or university establish due process for the resolution of academic grievances. This is to protect students from prejudiced and capricious academic evaluation. All undergraduate students enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts have a right to appeal grades which they deem unfair and unreasonable. The student must provide evidence indicating a mistake, fraud, or bad faith on the part of an instructor. Students will not be allowed to grieve a grade unless it is accompanied by such evidence.

Students should first contact their instructor to discuss the grade(s) in question, and if the matter cannot be resolved at that level, students are then urged to talk with the chairperson for the department in which this course was given. Chairperson information is available in this publication. A student must initiate the first stage of an academic grievance by the dates in the College of Liberal Arts Grievance Procedure, available at liberalarts.temple.edu/about-us/resources/undergraduates/undergraduate-grievance-procedure.

For more information, students should contact the college's Grievance Officer, Amanda Gibson, at gibson@temple.edu or 215-204-8504.

Non Academic Grievances

Students may have grievances that are not academic in nature. Such grievances should be directed to other offices on campus, which may include the Office of the Dean of Students, the Equal Opportunity Compliance office, Office of University Housing and Residential Life, and other units on campus. Students unsure as to where to proceed with a non-academic grievance should consult either with the Office of the Dean of Students or the college’s Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development.

Pre-Law Advising

Pre Law Advisors

Elizabeth Reynard
CLA Academic Advising
ereynard@temple.edu

Abby Cohen
CLA Academic Advising
abbycohen@temple.edu

Paul Crowe
Department of Philosophy
pcrowe@temple.edu 

Preparation for the Study of Law 

All law schools accept the degree of Bachelor of Arts as fulfillment of their requirements for admission. The Pre-Legal Education Committee of the Association of American Law Schools and the Temple University School of Law stress the importance of a well-rounded education. Liberal arts majors are considered excellent preparation for law school. Although Temple University does not have a specific major in Pre-Law, we do offer specialized advising for students interested in applying to law school, as well as majors in challenging disciplines that will help students hone their critical thinking, analytical and communication skills. Since the legal profession makes extensive use of both the written and spoken English language as professional tools, the law student should have extensive preparation in English in undergraduate courses. Because a large part of a lawyer's work requires problem solving and sound judgment, students should take courses that help develop creative power in thinking. The study of law, furthermore, rests upon a broad knowledge of western civilization, including its political, economic, and social institutions; hence, the student preparing for law should schedule courses which afford this broad background. Some law schools also recommend two semesters of accounting. After selecting a field of concentration, the student schedules courses in consultation with both the advisor in the area of concentration and with the pre-law advisor in the Center for Academic Advising and Professional Development of the College of Liberal Arts. 

Courses of Special Interest to Pre-Law Students 

While no specific undergraduate courses or majors are required for admission to accredited law schools, pre-law students are advised to select courses and programs of study that are intellectually challenging, while helping to develop necessary skills and knowledge.

To develop the communications skills of reading and comprehension, expository writing, and speaking:

CSCD 1108Introduction to Linguistics3
AOD 2214Conflict and Communication3
ENG 2006Introduction to Non-Fiction3
ENG 2009Writing the Research Essay3
English 2000+ Upper-level literature courses3
STRC 1111Public Speaking3
STRC 2112Strategies and Tactics of Persuasion3

To develop analytical reasoning skills:

PHIL 1055Critical Thinking3
PHIL 1066Introduction to Logic3
PHIL 1196Introduction to Philosophy3
PHIL 2121Introduction to Ethical Theory3
STRC 3336Argumentation3
Computer Science and Mathematics
Natural Science

Courses that are "law-related" because they either require reading of law cases or concern the study of particular legal issues are listed below for the convenience of interested students. Law school admissions officials prefer that pre-law students take very few such courses, believing that the teaching of law more appropriately belongs in the province of the law school. It may be useful, however, for students who are uncertain about attending law school to test their level of interest by selecting one or more of the following courses in the College of Liberal Arts:

AMST 3033Courtroom in American Society3
CJ 2501Introduction to Criminal Law3
CJ 3201The American Jury System3
CJ 3502Criminal Procedure: Prosecution & Adjudication3
GSWS 4004Women and Criminal Justice3
HIST 2105Race and the U.S. Constitution3
PHIL 1062Morality and the Law3
PHIL 2154Political Philosophy3
PHIL 3243Philosophy of Law3
POLS 3121American Constitutional Principles I3
POLS 3123American Constitutional Principles II: Civil Rights in America3
POLS 3411Classical Political Philosophy3
SOC 3243Social Movements and Conflict3

Since most law schools require applicants to submit the score earned on the Law School Aptitude Test, administered periodically by the Law School Admissions Service, students planning to study law should consult the pre-law advisor prior to the senior year to determine whether the school to which they plan to apply will require such a test and to determine the dates when such examinations are given. Prospective law students should consult the pre-law advisor about requirements for admission to law school, law school scholarship assistance, and opportunities in the legal profession. To satisfy statutory requirements, early in their senior year, prospective law students should consult the pre-law advisor concerning the legal requirements for practicing law in the state in which the student desires to study and practice. 

Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, International 

Students interested in College of Liberal Arts pre-law studies are encouraged to join Phi Alpha Delta. Its pre-law program assists "undergraduate students to make an 'informed choice' in selecting law as a career, deciding which law school to attend, and in preparing for the rigors of law school."

Phi Alpha Delta was formed "to advance the ideals of liberty and equal justice under law; to stimulate excellence in scholarship; to inspire the virtues of compassion and courage; to foster integrity and professional competence; to promote the welfare of its members; and to encourage their moral, intellectual, and cultural advancement." For more information about Phi Alpha Delta and College of Liberal Arts pre-law society, please contact Dr. Paul Crowe, pre-law advisor, at 215-204-8591 or pcrowe@temple.edu.

Faculty

Go to the College of Liberal Arts web site at liberalarts.temple.edu and click on the individual department for a list of faculty in that department. See also https://directory.temple.edu/.

Zain Abdullah, Associate Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., The New School for Social Research.

Carolyn T. Adams, Professor Emerita, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Washington University.

Howard Addison, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Graduate Theological Foundation.

Hiram Aldarondo, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Joseph D. Alkus, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; M.S., National Louis University.

David Allen, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Lauren B. Alloy, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Rebecca T. Alpert, Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Michael Altimore, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Elizabeth Alvarez, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity School.

Genevieve Amaral, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Nilgün Anadolu-Okur, Associate Professor, Department of Africology and African American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Hacettepe University.

Max Andrucki, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Leeds.

Kevin T. Arceneaux, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rice University.

Molefi Kete Asante, Professor, Department of Africology and African American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Alira Ashvo-Munoz, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.

Philip Atkins, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Santa Barbara.

Kathleen Auerhahn, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Riverside.

James D. Bachmeier, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Irvine.

Marcia B. Bailey, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity.

Debra Bangasser, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Steven R. Belenko, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Jamal Benin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Daniel W. Berman, Professor, Department of Greek and Roman Classics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Lila Corwin Berman, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Susan Bertolino, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., University of Chicago.

Kathleen A. Biddick, Professor Emerita, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Toronto.

Marcus Bingenheimer, Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Dr.Phil., Wurzburg University.

Erwin A. Blackstone, Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Khalid A. Y. Blankinship, Associate Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Washington.

Michael L. Bognanno, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Aryeh I. Botwinick, Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Gary W. Bowman, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University.

Lucy Bregman, Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity School.

Lisa A. Briand, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Sheldon R. Brivic, Professor Emeritus, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Seth C. Bruggeman, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., College of William and Mary.

Andrew Buck, Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Illinois.

Sarah Sunn Bush, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Gregory Byala, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Michelle D. Byng, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Virginia.

Sanjoy Chakravorty, Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Southern California.

Colin Chamberlain, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Isabelle Chang, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Linda Chavers, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Jason M. Chein, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Eunice Y. Chen, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Sydney.

Rujuta P. Chincholkar-Mandelia, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Fletcher Chmara-Huff, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Ohio State University.

Steven E. Cole, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Washington.

Bettye Collier-Thomas, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., George Washington University.

Gretchen A. Condran, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Whitley Cooke, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Norma Corrales-Martin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Ohio University.

Lindsay Craig, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.

Nyron Crawford, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Ohio State University.

Paul Crowe, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Catholic University of Louvain.

Alicia Aileen Cunningham-Bryant, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Beth K. Curran, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Roman A. Cybriwsky, Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.

Amanda Czerniawski, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Tirthatanmoy Das, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton.

Heath Fogg Davis, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Barbara A. Day-Hickman, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Irvine.

Richard E. Deeg, Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Kevin J. Delaney, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., State University of New York Stony Brook.

Samuel R. Delany, Professor Emeritus, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., The Bronx High School of Science.

James Michael DeLise, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

John A. Dern, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Lehigh University.

Dimitrios I. Diamantaras, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Rochester.

Nguyen Thi Dieu, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Aix-en-Provence.

Kenneth M. Dossar, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Hope N. Doyle, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.

Deborah A. G. Drabick, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., State University of New York Stony Brook.

Douglas Duckworth, Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Virginia.

William C. Dunkelberg, Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Professor Emerita, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Jaime Duran, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Michael M. Eisman, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Lauren Ellman, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Eugene Ericksen, Professor Emeritus, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Julia Ericksen, Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Rosario R. Espinal, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis.

Jamie J. Fader, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Mohsen Fardmanesh, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Paul Farnsworth, Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Robert L. Fauber Jr., Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D.

Barbara Ferman, Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Brandeis University.

Kenneth Finkel, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., Temple University.

K. Orfeo Fioretos, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Alexa Firat, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Ariane Fischer, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., George Washington University.

Talissa Ford, Assistant Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Joseph S. Foster, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Sergio R. Franco, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Amy L. Friedman, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of London.

Joseph Friedman, Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Yukari Fujiwara, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Studies, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., Eastern Michigan University.

Akim Gabriel, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., Temple University.

Carmelo A. Galati, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Inmaculada M. García-Sánchez, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Timothy Garelick, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Lehigh University.

Paul B. Garrett, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., New York University.

Suzanne Gauch, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

James R. Getz, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Brandeis University.

Maurizio Giammarco, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Melissa R. Gilbert, Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Clark University.

Tania Giovannetti, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Drexel University.

Joseph Giuffre, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Kristin Gjesdal, Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Oslo.

Travis F. Glasson, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Petra Goedde, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Eli C. Goldblatt, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Luis T. González del Valle, Professor Emeritus, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Cynthia M. Gooch, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Judith Goode, Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Alex Gottesman, Assistant Professor, Department of Greek and Roman Classics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Kimberly Ann Goyette, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Cristina Gragnani, Assistant Professor, Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Peter Gran, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Sherri L. Grasmuck, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Texas.

Douglas Greenfield, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Leonard O. Greenfield, Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Elizabeth Groff, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Maryland.

Rachael Groner, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Purdue University.

Lisa Grunberger, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity School.

Alexandra Guisinger, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Elizabeth Gunderson, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Michael G. Hagen, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Simon Hakim, Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Raymond Halnon, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; B.A., Boston College.

Espen Hammer, Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., The New School for Social Research.

Patricia Hansell, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Donald A. Hantula, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame.

Carissa M. Harris, Assistant Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

M. Kay Harris, Associate Professor Emerita, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., University of Chicago.

Philip W. Harris, Associate Professor Emeritus, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts.

Carol Harris-Shapiro, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Allison Hayes-Conroy, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Clark University.

Richard G. Heimberg, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Florida State University.

Katherine Henry, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Kevin A. Henry, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., McGill University.

Karen Klaiber Hersch, Associate Professor, Department of Greek and Roman Classics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Michael Hesson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Matthew L. Hiller, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Texas Christian University.

Kathryn A. Hirsh-Pasek, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

William L. Holmes, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Jonathan C. Holmquist, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Kathy M. Houff, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Georgia.

Alistair Q. Howard, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., George Washington University.

Roselyn Hsueh, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Shuchen Susan Huang, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts.

Richard H. Immerman, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Boston College.

Michael Ingram, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; M.F.A., University of Iowa.

Cheryl L. Irons-Guynn, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; J.D., Temple University.

Andrew C. Isenberg, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Jessie B. Iwata, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; M.S.Ed., Temple University.

Alesha Jackson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Peter James, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Lehigh University.

Stephen Jankiewicz, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Wilbert L. Jenkins, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Jayasinhji Jhala, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

C. Amari Johnson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Africology and African American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D.

Kareem J. Johnson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Peter R. Jones, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Aberystwyth University.

Priya Joshi, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Joyce A. Joyce, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Georgia.

Nyasha Junior, Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary.

Hana Muzika Kahn, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Andrew Karpinski, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D.

Deborah Karr, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ed.D., Temple University.

Robert L. Kaufman, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin.

Michael W. Kaufmann, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Charles Kaylor, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; M.U.P., University of Michigan.

Gabriella Kecskes, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Philip C. Kendall, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University.

Dustin Kidd, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Virginia.

Han-Kyul Kim, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of York.

Jacob Kim, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Sook Kyung Kim, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ed.D., Temple University.

Susan Klepp, Professor Emerita, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Joshua Klugman, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Indiana University.

Robin A. Kolodny, Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Kyriakos M. Kontopoulos, Professor Emeritus, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Rita Krueger, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Fyodor I. Kushnirsky, Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Plekhanov Institute of the National Economy.

Kenneth L. Kusmer, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

George M. Lady, Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Peter Lavelle, Assistant Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Anne Layman-Horn, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., New York University.

Mindie Lazarus-Black, Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Don Lee, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; M.F.A., Emerson College.

Jeffrey Ethan Lee, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., New York University.

Sue-Im Lee, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago.

Michael A. Leeds, Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Frank Leib, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Mark A. Leuchter, Associate Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Toronto.

Heather Levi, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., New York University.

Judith A. Levine, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Laura S. Levitt, Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Emory University.

Richard L. Libowitz, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Vasiliki M. Limberis, Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Th.D., Harvard University.

Jay B. Lockenour, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Peter Logan, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Gerardo Augusto Lorenzino, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Graduate Center, City University of New York.

Hilary Iris Lowe, Assistant Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Joshua Lukin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

Meghan Foster Lynch, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Johanna Catherine Maclean, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Louis S. Mangione, Associate Professor, Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Benny C. Marcus, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.

Joseph Margolis, Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

David L. Margules, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Peter J. Marshall, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Cambridge.

James Martin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Binghamton University.

John Masker, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Boston College.

Robert J. Mason, Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Michele Masucci, Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Clark University.

Melinda Mattingly, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Saint Louis University.

Ama Mazama, Associate Professor, Department of Africology and African American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., La Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris III.

Walter Thomas McAllister, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; M.F.A., University of Iowa.

Patricia M. McCarthy, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., Temple University.

Michael S. McCloskey, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi.

Stanley McDonald, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; M.F.A., Brown University.

Joan Mellen, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., City University of New York.

Patricia Melzer, Assistant Professor, Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Clark University.

Ming Meng, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.

Jeremy Mennis, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.

Joanne C. Metzger, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; J.D., Widener University School of Law.

Aldona Middlesworth, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., Temple University.

Marina Mikhaylova, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Juris M. Milestone, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Nichole E. Miller, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Irvine.

David Mislin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Boston University.

Robin N. Mitchell-Boyask, Professor, Department of Greek and Roman Classics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Brown University.

Pamela Beth Monaco, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Patricia A. Moore-Martinez, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Hortensia R. Morell, Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Thomas Morton, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Geoffrey Moss, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Andrew R. Mossin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Gary A. Mucciaroni, Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Srimati Mukherjee, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Louisiana.

Shigenori Nagatomo, Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Hawaii.

Michael Neff, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., University of Pennsylvania.

Kimani Nehusi, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Africology and African American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D.

Harvey R. Neptune, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., New York University.

Nora S. Newcombe, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Steven L. Newman, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

David Nickerson, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Daniel T. O'Hara, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Thomas Olino, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Stony Brook University.

Ingrid Olson, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

David J. Organ, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Richard Orodenker, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., Johns Hopkins University.

Miles D. Orvell, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Jena Osman, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

Lara Ostaric, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame.

Sharon C. Ostrow, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., Rutgers University.

Willis F. Overton, Professor Emeritus, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Clark University.

Randall J. Pabich, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Christine Palumbo-De Simone, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Catherine Panzarella, Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Marcela Pardes, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Vinay Parikh, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Punjabi University.

Anna L. Peak, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

C. Hamil Pearsall, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Clark University.

Elizabeth W. Pearson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., Sarah Lawrence College.

José Manuel Pereiro Otero, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Colorado Boulder.

Donna Marie Peters, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., The New School for Social Research.

Sonja Peterson-Lewis, Associate Professor, Department of Africology and African American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Florida-Gainesville.

Carolyn Phipps, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Montserrat Piera, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.

Mark A. Pollack, Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Lori Pompa, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; M.S.W., Rutgers University.

Gary D. Pratt, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Brandeis University.

Peter Puchek, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Lehigh University.

Victor M. Pueyo Zoco, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., State University of New York Stony Brook.

David E. Racker, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Tulane University.

John C. Raines, Professor Emeritus, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D.

Anthony Ranere, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Davis.

Jerry H. Ratcliffe, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Nottingham (UK).

Elliot A. Ratzman, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Aunshul P. Rege, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

George F. Rengert, Professor Emeritus, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of North Carolina.

Terry Rey, Associate Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Eunsook Ha Rhee, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ed.D., Temple University.

Monica Ricketts, Assistant Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Moritz Ritter, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Toronto.

Paula D. Robison, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

L. Christie Rockwell, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Davis.

Norman Roessler, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Wilbert J. Roget, Associate Professor, Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Caterina Gouvis Roman, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., American University.

Jessica Roney, Assistant Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Christina Rosan, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Cathryn Jo Rosen, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; LL.M., Temple University.

Natasha T. Rossi, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Christopher Roy, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Eileen Ryan, Assistant Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

James Salazar, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Rickie Sanders, Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Ohio State University.

Sheryl Sawin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Rochester.

Jeremy Schipper, Associate Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Kolson Schlosser, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.

Joseph M. Schwartz, Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Jordan Shapiro, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Pacifica Graduate Institute.

Pamela J. Shapiro, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Jacob Shell, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Syracuse University.

Adam Joseph Shellhorse, Assistant Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Thomas F. Shipley, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Muffy E. Siegel, Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts.

Jill K. Sigman, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Brown University.

Marilyn Silberfein, Professor Emerita, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Syracuse University.

Pedro Silos, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Daniel A. Silverman, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; J.D., Temple University.

Bryant Simon, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Alan S. Singer, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Washington.

Matthew Smetona, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Aaron X. Smith, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Africology and African American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Hillel David Soifer, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Miriam Solomon, Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

John A. Sorrentino, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Purdue University.

C. Christopher Soufas, Professor Emeritus, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Duke University.

Teresa Scott Soufas, Professor Emerita, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Duke University.

Laura Spagnoli, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Howard Spodek, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Gerald J. Stahler, Professor, Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Damien Stankiewicz, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., New York University.

Laurence D. Steinberg, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Cornell University.

R. Michael Stewart, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Catholic University.

Mary Stricker, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Dorothy Stringer, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University at Albany, State University of New York.

William J. Stull, Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sandra L. Suárez, Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Charles E. Swanson, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

Elizabeth Sweet, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Geography and Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago.

Leonard J. Swidler, Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin.

Naomi Taback, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Benjamin Talton, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Ralph B. Taylor, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Ronald D. Taylor, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Brian Teare, Assistant Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; M.F.A., Indiana University.

Rebbeca Tesfai, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Ruth P. Thomas, Professor, Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Yale University.

Barbara E. Thornbury, Associate Professor, Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of British Columbia.

Teshale Tibebu, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton.

Paul D. Toth, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Tara N. Tripp, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; M.S., Saint Joseph's University.

Kathleen S. Uno, Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Gregory J. W. Urwin, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame.

Nicole Martorano Van Cleve, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Ryan Vander Wielen, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis.

Lawrence Venuti, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Pablo S. Vila, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.

Gerald A. Vision, Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

E. Rely Vîlcicã, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Thomas J. Waidzunas, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California San Diego.

Shannon Walters, Assistant Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.

Grant H. Ward, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Jeffrey T. Ward, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Florida.

Owen J. Ware, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Toronto.

Donald Wargo, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Anthony Waskie, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of French, German, Italian and Slavic, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., New York University.

David Harrington Watt, Professor, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

David Waxler, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts, Rutgers University.

Ronald W. Webb, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Latin American Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.

Douglas Webber, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Marsha A. Weinraub, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Robert W. Weisberg, Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Princeton University.

Charles A. Weitz, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.

Susan Wells, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.

Wayne N. Welsh, Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Irvine.

Sharon White, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Denver.

Sydney D. White, Associate Professor, Department of Religion, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Catherine Wiley, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Temple University.

Kimberly D. Williams, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Ohio State University.

Roland L. Williams Jr., Associate Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Gregory Winch, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University.

Brad Windhauser, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Writing Program, College of Liberal Arts; M.F.A., Queens University of Charlotte.

Gordon Witty, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Studies, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., University of Pennsylvania.

David Wolfsdorf, Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Jennifer D. Wood, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Toronto.

Matt Wray, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Hongling Xie, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Philip R. Yannella, Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Sean Yom, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Harvard University.

Reiko Yoshida, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Studies, College of Liberal Arts; M.A., West Chester University.

Ralph F. Young, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of History, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Yuan Yuan, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Lu Zhang, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Shanyang Zhao, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Maryland.

Yun Zhu, Assistant Professor, Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Studies, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of South Carolina.

Rebekah Zhuraw, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Intellectual Heritage, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Dai Zusai, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.