School of Sport, Tourism & Hospitality Management

Founded 1998

M. Moshe Porat, Dean
R. Aubrey Kent, Senior Associate Dean
111 Speakman Hall (006-68)
1810 North 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-8701
http://sthm.temple.edu/
sthm@temple.edu

Accreditation

Temple University’s Sport & Recreation Management Program is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions (COAPRT). Temple University's School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management (STHM) was first accredited in 1978, and the academic program(s) were re-accredited every 5 years since 1978. This means that Temple University was one of the first university programs to become accredited through the National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA). Other accreditations have been discussed (i.e., North American Society of Sport Management (NASSM), and International – CHRIE, the Council for Tourism and Hospitality Educators), but neither of their accrediting bodies have been recognized by the Council for Higher Education Association (CHEA). The Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions (COAPRT) accredits baccalaureate programs in parks, recreation, tourism, sport management, event management, therapeutic recreation, and leisure studies offered at regionally accredited institutions within the United States and its territories, and at nationally accredited institutions in Canada and Mexico.

Goals & Objectives

The total experience within the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management enables students to have an excellent fundamental education and exposure to working professionals, internships, and personalized placement services. As a result, students are given a competitive advantage in a job market projected to double in the next decade.

The School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management offers two undergraduate major programs:

  • Sport and Recreation Management
  • Tourism and Hospitality Management

The focus of the undergraduate programs is to provide a broad educational foundation and to prepare students for entry into the sport and recreation management, leisure service, or tourism and hospitality occupations at the professional level.

The Sport and Recreation Management program prepares students interested in sport and recreation careers in the private/commercial sector, public recreation and park agencies, professional sports, athletics, youth sport agencies, voluntary agencies, campus services, armed forces, and corporate/industrial settings.

The Tourism and Hospitality Management program prepares students for entry-level to mid-level positions in tourism, hospitality, and event management. The program prepares students to work in convention and visitors' bureaus, destination management organizations, conference centers, resorts, casinos, hotels, theme parks, theaters, and clubs.

Both programs consist of coursework in the University's General Education (GenEd), the School's major course requirements, the supplemental electives from related disciplines, and two supervised field experiences.  

Admissions

If you are applying for admission to Temple University as a freshman or a transfer student and wish to major in Sport and Recreation Management or Tourism and Hospitality Management, you should select the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management as your school/college. Then choose your major – Sport and Recreation Management or Tourism and Hospitality Management – as your curriculum. Submit the required materials to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. Once you apply, you will receive an AccessNet Username and Password to check your application status online on the Student TUportal System.

Information regarding the admissions process should be directed to the School’s Assistant Director of Enrollment Management at sthm@temple.edu

Financial Aid & Scholarships

Information regarding financial aid and scholarships is available from the Office of Student Financial Services. For additional information pertaining to specific scholarships within the School's disciplines, refer to the Center for Student Services

Special Programs and/or Professional Certification

Honors Community

Students admitted to the University Honors Program are eligible, by invitation only, to be part of the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management's Honors Community. Students participate in pre-approved Fox School of Business and Management Honors courses.

Student Association Information

Professional development begins with membership to associations/organizations for all School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management (STHM) students. We encourage our students to consider joining one of the following groups during their academic tenure in STHM. More information about each STHM Student Professional Organization (SPO) is available at the Center for Student Services. Scholarship opportunities are available within the associations for those who are active members. Please be reminded that, in most cases, students must be a member of the association for at least one year to be eligible for the available scholarships.

Undergraduate Student Professional Organizations

American Hotel & Lodging Association (AH&LA)

Serving the hospitality industry for nearly a century, AH&LA is the sole national association representing all sectors and stakeholders in the lodging industry, including individual hotel property members, hotel companies, student and faculty members, and industry suppliers. The Temple University chapter strives to set the foundation for the future hospitality careers of students through exposure and networking opportunities with industry professionals, and to open the door for students to delve into the hotel and lodging industry.

Event Planning Association (EPA) 

The Event Planning Association of STHM plans and engages all SPOs in social, bonding, and informational activities, to ensure that the students are networking throughout STHM to help better their future careers.

Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International (HSMAI) / Destination Marketing Association International (DMAI)

HSMAI.tucc is a collegiate chapter under HSMAI. Members of the HSMAI Temple University Collegiate Chapter are mainly Temple University students and alumni who are interested in the profession of sales and marketing in the hospitality and tourism industries. The organization provides opportunities for students to network with professionals, as well as other collegiate chapters at monthly meetings, annual conferences, and special events. Any Tourism and Hospitality Management student looking to embark upon exposure to the hospitality industry should join this association.

Meeting Professionals International (MPI)

TempleMPI is a student professional organization in the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management. It is an organization that combines education and networking to assist students to succeed academically and professionally. Through fundraising, networking, and various other opportunities, it helps to create a positive name for itself as well as its organization. TempleMPI creates opportunities, instead of waiting for them. Join and let it help you shape your future.

National Society of Minorities in Hospitality (NSMH)

NSMH is the premier professional organization for minority hospitality students. It addresses diversity and multiculturalism, as well as the career development of its student members. Temple University NSMH exposes students to opportunities in the industry nationwide. It provides events and programs that bring together college-level students with company sponsors, industry representatives, other hospitality organizations, advisors and mentors, and hospitality high school students. Temple has the primary local student chapter that is supported by the Multicultural Affairs Congress (MAC) of the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau (PCVB).

Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA)

PCMA members represent about 6,000 meeting industry leaders, including corporate and independent meeting professionals, as well as industry suppliers, faculty, and students. Whether students are looking to build relationships locally or regionally, or to meet professionals in the field, there are a variety of resources as well as educational and networking events that open the doors to these professionals. The Temple PCMA chapter hosts a variety of events and programs.

Society of Minorities in Sport (SMS)

SMS is a professional organization that seeks to bring together undergraduate students in the community of sport who are underrepresented in the area of sport, leisure, and recreation management. We at SMS are empowering people to proactively advocate and encourage diverse experiences and opportunities that we as students bring together while working with professionals in the industry. Through conversations with minorities in leadership, as well as the facilitation of networking opportunities, SMS looks to expose students to a variety of learning and volunteer opportunities across our industry. From working with the Best Buddies initiative on their annual Friendship Walk, to programs with professors about the lack of representation among sports journalists, the experiences we provide for our students help build awareness of issues facing minorities in sport. We at SMS believe in an open and respectable environment to discuss issues within sport. We pride ourselves on making sure students are receiving the most up to date information possible to inspire them to make a difference in the world of sport.

Sport and Recreation Professional Association (SRPA)

SRPA is a bridge between sport academia and the sports industry. SRPA is Temple’s original student-run organization designed specifically for Sport and Recreation Management majors. SRPA provides an excellent opportunity to network with students within the major and industry professionals through scheduled events, conferences, and semester meetings.

Sport Marketing Association of Temple University (SMAT)

The purpose of the Sport Marketing Association of Temple University (SMAT) is to expose Sport and Recreation Management and Tourism and Hospitality Management majors in STHM to career professionals, particularly in the Sport Marketing industry. This is accomplished by providing networking opportunities, speakers, and volunteer opportunities to allow members to gain more knowledge about various careers in the Sport Marketing industry.

Sport and Governance Association (SAGA)

The purpose of the Sport and Governance Association is to expose its members to the following opportunities: networking events with established professionals in the sports law industry, information sessions on the potential careers available, guest speaker engagements, and access to LSAT preparatory resources. All of these opportunities guide the members throughout the process of becoming successful sport business professionals. As a member of the Sport and Governance Association, individuals will gain an understanding of all the legal implications of business. 

Honors Societies

Eta Sigma Delta (ESD)

Eta Sigma Delta is an international honor society that recognizes exceptional academic achievement among hospitality and tourism students. Eta Sigma Delta is administered by the International Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Education (International CHRIE), the leading International association devoted to hospitality and tourism education. To earn this membership, students have to hold at least a 3.0 minimum in a 4.0 grade point average system and be in the top 20% of their class to be eligible for this invitation. With the expansion of International CHRIE, membership is no longer limited to those who are studying in the United States. 

Rho Phi Lambda (RPL) Professional Honorary Fraternity

Rho Phi Lambda is a National Honorary Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services Fraternity. Rho Phi Lambda strives to recognize Sport and Recreation Management majors who have exemplified academic excellence in scholarship, leadership, and service. Membership in Rho Phi Lambda cultivates student professional development through networking opportunities, scholarship eligibility, résumé building, and campus and community service initiatives.

Special Facilities & Programs

Center for Student Services (CSS)

The CSS encourages a collaborative relationship between advisor and student, ultimately empowering the student to make sound and responsible decisions concerning his or her education. The student takes an active role in the utilization of the services offered by the School, and the University at large, while the academic advisor strives to assist the student with his or her academic, cultural, emotional, and pre-professional needs.

Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD)

The CSPD links classroom learning to successful career development. The CSPD resources offer students the latest internship and job opportunities through counseling on résumés, cover letters, interviewing skills, and selection criteria.

Sport Industry Research Center (SIRC)

SIRC provides opportunities for academics, students, and practitioners to explore the potential of sport to impact the communities within which they exist. Through a series of initiatives, SIRC attempts to conduct and disseminate research, educate and train executives, and function as a think tank and informational resource for those involved in the sport industry. Included amongst the initiatives that SIRC is involved in are: executive workshops, doctoral student training, community-based programming, event management and program consulting, and academic dissemination of cutting-edge research and managerial best practices.

U.S.-Asia Center for Tourism & Hospitality Research

Temple University’s U.S.-Asia Center for Tourism & Hospitality Research was established to be a leading braintrust that advances the development of the U.S. and Asian tourism and hospitality industries, education, and research. With extensive connections across the globe and deep roots in the city of Philadelphia — the first World Heritage City in the U.S., — the Center is uniquely positioned to propel Temple University and STHM’s international presence.

The U.S.-Asia Center conducts cutting-edge multidisciplinary research and consultancy specific to the tourism, hospitality, and related industries in the U.S., Asia, and the entire Asia-Pacific region. It aims to establish and enhance connections between government, industry, and other public entities in the tourism and hospitality areas. A few research areas include:

  • destination marketing
  • big data analytics
  • consumer profile analysis
  • yield and revenue management
  • hospitality asset evaluation

Members of the Center are STHM faculty with national and international recognition, and come from broad disciplinary and industry backgrounds.

Student Contact Information

Heather A. Blackburn, Ed.D.
Assistant Dean
111 Speakman Hall (006-68)
1810 North 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122

Jarvis Bailey, Ed.D.
Student Services/Associate Director
349 Speakman Hall (006-68)
1810 North 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-1754
jarvis.bailey@temple.edu

Lauren McCulligan
Student Services/Undergraduate Academic Advisor 
349 Speakman Hall (006-68)
1810 North 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-8759
lmcculligan@temple.edu

Academic Policies & Regulations

Please see Undergraduate Academic Policies in this Bulletin. Students are responsible for complying with all university-wide academic policies that apply to their individual academic status. Additional and unique policies, or exceptions for the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management, appear below.

All advising issues regarding academic policies and regulations should be directed to the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management's Center for Student Services (CSS) in Speakman Hall Suite 349, 1810 North 13th Street. 

Dean's List

Each fall and spring semester, those undergraduates who have met the credit hour and academic criteria for their school or college are placed on the Dean's List. See the Dean's List policy for specific GPA and credit-hour requirements. 

Student Code of Conduct, Good Neighbor Policy, and STHM Students Doctrine of Responsibility

All students in the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management are expected to abide by Temple University's Student Code of Conduct, Good Neighbor Policy, and the STHM Students Doctrine of Responsibility.

The School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management (STHM) represents a high degree of scholastic excellence. In turn, the School expects an enhanced level of responsibility and preparation from its students. STHM students represent the School in a variety of forums, including, but not limited to, the classroom, internships, and workplace settings. These environments require professionalism, commitment, knowledge, and mutual respect. The STHM Students Doctrine of Responsibility policy will assist students in their pursuit of excellence while earning their degrees in Sport and Recreation Management or Tourism and Hospitality Management. 

Grievance Procedures and Ombudsperson

University Ombudspersons are designated annually by the provost and vice presidents of the University. They are knowledgeable about harassment matters and trained to assist in understanding and resolving informal complaints. Ombudspersons are sensitive to the feelings, rights, and interests of all parties, and have demonstrated ability to handle confidential and sensitive matters in a discreet manner.

STHM's Academic Grievance Procedures are detailed in the following document: STHM Academic Grievance Procedures. Additional information can be obtained from Temple University's Student and Faculty Academic Rights and Responsibilities policy.

For further information, contact:

Dr. Debra Blair 
Ombudsperson for Undergraduate and Master's Students
368 Speakman Hall
1810 North 13th Street
215-204-1077
dblair@temple.edu

Temple University's Statements and Policies can be found on the Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity, Advocacy and Leadership (IDEAL) web site.

Program Performance

Students not in good standing are subject to collegial warning and/or probation, or they may be academically dismissed and will be so notified by the Senior Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies. See the University policy on Academic Standing for details on academic warning, academic probation, academic dismissal, and reinstatement. 

Transfer Between Colleges Within the University

Students may initiate transfer to STHM from another school or college of the University if they are in academic good standing, holding a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. 

Change of Program Request

The Change of Program Request form can be picked up at any advising center or on the Senior Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies web site. Students wishing to transfer into STHM should follow the process below:

  • Visit STHM's Assistant Director of Enrollment Management
    STHM offers students the opportunity to meet with a personal enrollment manager to have questions about the programs and the major-change process answered. Students can meet with her in one of two ways:
    • Walk-Ins
      Students can walk-in to meet with Kimberly Maynard, STHM's Assistant Director of Enrollment Management. Feel free to walk-in to Speakman Hall, Suite 111 during normal business hours.
    • STHM Aware and Declare Days
      STHM Aware and Declare Days are 45-minute information sessions on the last day of every month at which time students can explore STHM's majors and learn about the programs. Visit Aware and Declare Days to register.
  • Complete a Change of Program Request Form
    After meeting with the STHM Assistant Director of Enrollment Management or attending an STHM Aware and Declare Day, students can complete a Change of Program Request form and submit the completed form to the STHM Dean's Office in Speakman Hall, Suite 111.
  • Meet with an STHM Academic Advisor
    Once the Change of Program Request form is processed, students should make an individual appointment with an STHM academic advisor to discuss courses, graduation planning, and the academic advising checklists. Questions can be sent to Kimberly Maynard, Assistant Director of Enrollment Management at kimberly.maynard@temple.edu.

Non-Majors

Guidelines for Non-Majors Interested in STHM Coursework

  • Non-Major students should, upon expressing interest in STHM coursework, seek advising guidance from their home school/college first to ensure availability within their graduation plan.
  • Non-Major students should seek consultation with an STHM academic advisor, especially if interested in an STHM Minor and/or Certificate.
  • Non-Major students with a senior status at the University may not be allowed to proceed with specific STHM courses. Visit the Center for Student Services web site for details.
  • Non-Major students may register for more than one STHM course per semester if seats are available in the section of interest.
  • STHM students will take precedence over non-major students with regard to STHM required coursework and available seats.
  • Students who elect to proceed with STHM 0827 and/or STHM 0857 should consult with an STHM academic advisor in reference to the course(s) applicability to their curriculum.

School Graduation Requirements

The information below is for new freshmen and transfer students admitted fall 2017 - spring 2018.  For information prior to this time, refer to the catalog year for your matriculation semester and year. Click on the Archives link to see Bulletins from previous years.

Center for Student Services (CSS)
School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management (STHM)
349 Speakman Hall (006-68)
1810 North 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-8905 

  • Students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree from the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management (STHM) must complete 124 semester hours of coursework and have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0.
  • Certain courses may fulfill multiple requirements. In consultation with an advisor, students will be able to plan their curriculum more effectively.
  • The total number of credit hours at graduation may vary for some students based on initial placement exams, transfer evaluations, individual curricular choices, and academic progress.
  • Students are required to ensure that they have fulfilled the necessary prerequisites for any given course or course sequence. Students may read the entire policy in the section on university-wide Academic Policies.
  • First Aid and CPR Certifications are required.
  • Completion of 250 Industry-Related Hours is required.
  • Students must obtain a passport upon entering their first semester of senior coursework.

Academic Advising

Dr. Jarvis Bailey, Ed.D., Student Services/Associate Director
jarvis.bailey@temple.edu
215-204-1754

Advisees:

  • All students majoring in Sport and Recreation Management

  • All fourth and fifth year seniors majoring in Tourism and Hospitality Management

  • All STHM Honors students

  • All Student-Athletes

  • All +1 students - Sport Business, M.S. and Tourism and Hospitality Management, M.T.H.M.

  • Students interested in the Certificate in Sport Management

  • Students interested in the Certificate in Sport Marketing

  • Students interested in the Minor in Sport Management

Ms. Lauren McCulligan, Student Services/Undergraduate Academic Advisor I
lmcculligan@temple.edu
215-204-8759

Advisees:

  • All freshmen, sophomores, and juniors majoring in Tourism and Hospitality Management

  • Students interested in the Certificate in Event Leadership

  • Students interested in the Certificate in Tourism and Hospitality Management

  • Students interested in the Minor in Tourism and Hospitality Management

  • All Pre-Business students

Services Provided Through the Center for Student Services (CSS)

Center for Student Services (CSS)
Speakman Hall (006-68), Suite 349
1810 North 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-8905

The School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management's advising unit, the CSS, provides individualized information on placement exams and results, majors, minors, course sequence and load, scheduling, career planning, and academic resources. As a result, students are better equipped to make well-informed decisions regarding their futures.

The CSS encourages a collaborative relationship between advisor and student, ultimately empowering the student to make sound and responsible decisions concerning his or her education. The student takes an active role in the utilization of the services offered by the School, and the University at large, while the academic advisor strives to assist the student with his or her academic, cultural, emotional, and pre-professional needs. 

Special Advising Policies and Procedures

The school utilizes a variety of advising sessions: evening, electronic group advising, Saturday, virtual, and walk-in sessions; however, students are encouraged to schedule individualized appointments to cater to their specific academic needs.

Faculty

Benjamin Altschuler, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., University of Utah.

Elizabeth H. Barber, Associate Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Heather A. Blackburn, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ed.D., Drexel University.

Debra K. Blair, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ed.D., Temple University.

Joris Drayer, Associate Professor, Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., University of Northern Colorado.

Daniel C. Funk, Professor, Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Michael W. Jackson, Professor, Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; H.S.D., Indiana University.

Jeremy S. Jordan, Associate Professor, Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

R. Aubrey Kent, Professor, Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Ceridwyn Ann King, Associate Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., Griffith University.

Thilo Kunkel, Assistant Professor, Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., Griffith University.

Xiang Li, Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Lu Lu, Assistant Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., University of Washington.

Joseph E. Mahan III, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.

Chihyung Michael Ok, Associate Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Richard Ridall, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Sport and Recreation Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; M.Ed., Temple University.

Wesley S. Roehl, Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Ira L. Rosen, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; M.A., Montclair State University.

Michael F. Sheridan, Assistant Professor (Practice), Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; M.T.H.M., Temple University.

Kyung-A Sun, Assistant Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Erinn D. Tucker, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

Luorong Wu, Assistant Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Yang Yang, Assistant Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management; Ph.D., University of Florida.