College of Education

Founded 1919

Dr. Gregory M. Anderson, Dean
245 Ritter Hall
1301 Cecil B. Moore Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6091
215-204-8017
COEdean@temple.edu

https://education.temple.edu/ 

Mission Statement

The College of Education at Temple University promotes education – in schools, in the workplace, in organizations, and through community engagement – as a critically important way to achieve social justice. Our mission is to prepare our students to become agents of change who employ leading-edge understandings and evidence-based practices in any setting in which they might work. Our faculty include experts not only in early childhood/elementary, middle-grades, and secondary teacher education, but also in adult and organizational development, applied behavior analysis, career and technical education, counseling psychology, educational psychology/human development, higher education, leadership, school psychology, special education, teaching English to speakers of other languages, and urban education.

In our research, we work both to conduct well-designed investigations that have the potential to improve learning and teaching, especially for historically underserved populations, and to provide effective mentorship of master's and doctoral students so that they can engage in similar kinds of investigations on their own. In our teaching, we strive to provide practitioners and prospective practitioners with deep understandings both of research and theory and of how research and theory can be translated into effective practice. As a result of our strategic location in North Philadelphia and our long history of collaboration with the School District of Philadelphia and other community partners, the College of Education is uniquely situated to have a collective impact in the surrounding neighborhoods. We also endeavor, however, to bring our work to the largest possible audience in the city of Philadelphia, the region, the nation, and the world.

History

While the official date for the founding of the College of Education is usually given as 1919, the college has included teacher preparation as part of its curricula almost from its inception. It is clear from Temple's history that the unofficial founder of the college was Laura Carnell, who began a program for the preparation of kindergarten teachers as early as 1895. The College of Education was founded in 1919 as Teachers College. Its initial programs in elementary and then secondary education were offered largely in response to the Philadelphia School District's decision that higher positions in the city's school system would be open only to those with a college degree. As a consequence, the college began offering two, three, and four-year programs to teachers, as well as extension work, day and evening courses, five days a week and on Saturday mornings. This intimate relationship between the college and the School District of Philadelphia characterizes almost all of the college's history. The college was one of the first institutions to schedule courses so that teachers could take them after school hours. Programs of graduate study at the master's level were introduced in 1923, with the Doctor of Education degree being first awarded in 1931. The official name was changed to the "College of Education" in 1960.

Historically, Temple's College of Education has had a significant impact on local and regional practice. It has always been the largest college of education in the region and one of the largest in the country. The College continues to be the major provider of teachers for the Philadelphia School District and for many suburban districts. Many principals and superintendents of the neighboring regions have received their degrees from Temple. Many of the school psychologists, counselors, educational researchers, and other education professionals have been prepared at Temple. In a very real sense, the College of Education has helped to shape the educational direction of the region. In addition, recognizing that education occurs both in and out of school, the College has in recent years diversified its programs to provide preparation to those who plan to work with learners across the lifespan not only in schools but also in businesses and community-based organizations.

Accreditation

The College of Education is an accredited member of the Middle States Accreditation.

The College offers programs approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) that are designed for students seeking certificates to teach in early childhood/elementary, middle-grades, secondary, special education and business education settings.

Academic Opportunities

+1 Programs

Eligible undergraduate students begin graduate courses to fulfill requirements for their undergraduate degree that will also count toward a graduate degree. Upon graduation from their undergraduate program, students move seamlessly into their graduate program which they complete in one additional year. The College of Education offers many +1 programs for College of Education majors as well as students in other majors at Temple University. Students can read more about available +1 programs in this Bulletin.

English Language Teaching Certificate:

The undergraduate English Language Teaching Certificate prepares students who are interested in teaching English to adult immigrant learners, international college students, and/or students overseas. Some may already be involved in teaching English as a second language (ESL) in the Writing Center, serve as conversation partners in ESL programs, or volunteer as teachers in community-based ESL programs. Others may anticipate going abroad and teaching English as a foreign language (EFL). Students interested in this program may not be ready to commit themselves to starting a Master's in TESOL but are keen to acquire basic skills in English language teaching. For more information and to add this certificate, students should 1) meet with their college advisor to discuss adding the certificate and how the requirements fit into their degree program and then 2) must meet with a College of Education Undergraduate Advisor to add this certificate.

Diamond Research Scholars Program

The Diamond Research Scholars Program provides Temple undergraduates the opportunity to engage in a focused, mentored research or creative arts project during the summer and fall. The program requires that students participate in the two-day Undergraduate Research Institute, devote ten weeks during the summer to develop a research project in their area of interest under the direction of their faculty mentor, and complete the project during the fall semester while registered for an independent study/research course. For eligibility and other information, please visit http://www.temple.edu/vpus/opportunities/researchscholars.htm; students can also visit the College of Education web site for research opportunities within the College.

Career and Student Development

The College of Education is committed to support and prepare students entering today's competitive job market, while providing them with the tools to help them excel in their chosen fields. Career planning is an ongoing process that begins early. While partnering with the Career Center, the College of Education ensures all undergraduate and graduate students develop the requisite professional skills that will help them locate meaningful internships, externships and permanent jobs with regional and national employers. We provide students with a range of resources  designed to help them conduct a successful career search  including employment agencies, career fairs, networking, web sites, professional associations, chambers of commerce, job search clubs, informational interviewing, etc.

The College of Education's Career and Student Development Office can assist with:

  • Selecting or refining career goals and interests
  • Developing résumés, cover letters and thank you letters
  • Finding and applying for internships or full-time employment
  • Conducting mock interviews
  • Provide networking guidance
  • Offering professional development workshops

Scholarships and Awards

Through the generous support of our loyal alumni, faculty, staff and friends of the College of Education, we are able to offer a limited number of scholarships to our incoming and current students based on merit and/or need. Current information regarding scholarships available can be found on the College of Education Scholarships web site. Incoming students can contact educate@temple.edu for specific questions. Current students are notified via their Temple e-mail address early in the spring semester about available scholarships and application processes.

Contact Information

College of Education
Shimada Resource Center
150 Ritter Annex
1301 Cecil B. Moore Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-8011 (phone)
215-204-4383 (fax)
Office Hours:  8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday

Additional Contacts & Directories

Academic Policies & Regulations

Students are responsible for complying with all university and college policies and procedures. Teacher education students are responsible for understanding additional policies related to Pennsylvania Department of Education (P.D.E.) requirements for teacher certification.

Academic Responsibility

College of Education Academic Advisors are trained in policy, curricular requirements, and procedures to evaluate information and to work with students, providing the best possible advice. The College of Education expects students to take responsibility for understanding their curricular requirements and making progress toward their degrees. All students are expected to collaborate with an Academic Advisor each semester to discuss questions and concerns and ensure timely completion of his/her program.

Academic Overload Requests

Students in the College of Education must petition through an Academic Advisor when requesting permission to take more than 18 credits in either the fall or spring semesters (12-18 credits is considered full time for financial aid purposes) or more than 8 credits in either summer session. Each petition is evaluated individually and a decision rendered; submission of a petition does not guarantee approval. The student will be alerted of the decision via e-mail. Criteria considered when reviewing an overload petition include, but are not limited to: current cumulative GPA; number of credits already attempted and earned; previous semesters, if any, in which a student took an overload and GPA earned in such semesters; amount of overload credits requested; which specific courses the student will be taking in that semester. Decisions are made at the sole discretion of the College. Students will be notified via their TUmail address of the decision.

Attendance

Attendance policies for College of Education courses are established at the discretion of the instructor. Supplementing University policy, the College of Education requires all students to adhere to instructors' attendance policies as set forth in course syllabi.

Awarding of Bachelor Degrees

The College of Education does not award Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees to students who have already completed an accredited first Bachelor's, Master's, or Ph.D. degree, regardless of when the degree was completed. 

Candidacy

All students enrolled in teacher education programs must achieve Candidacy to progress to upper level teaching methods courses and student teaching. This requirement is aligned with Pennsylvania legislation. Students should read more about Candidacy in the College Requirements section of this Bulletin.

Change of Program

Changing into a College of Education Program From Another College at Temple

Students in other colleges/schools at Temple who wish to change their program to a College of Education program (major) must complete the Change of Program (COP) class found on Canvas. After completing this class, students are eligible to schedule an individual appointment with an Academic Advisor; this is the final step in changing the program of study. To be enrolled in the Change of Program class, students should call 215-204-8011.

Important note: Changing  programs may result in additional time to degree completion and this should be taken into consideration by each student when making the decision to change programs. Students should be aware that all requirements of the university-approved curricula (as per the eight-semester plans that appear in this Bulletin) must be fulfilled. In making the decision to change programs, students should consult with a College of Education advisor to create an academic plan that identifies the impact of changing programs on anticipated graduation date.

GPA Requirements

Students seeking to transfer into a teacher education/certification program must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0; no exceptions are made to this GPA requirement.1 Students interested in a certification program who do not yet have a 3.0 or who are still deciding if the program is right for them are eligible to take certain courses prior to officially changing their program; students interested in doing so must complete the COP class and meet with an Advisor to discuss which courses they are eligible to take that would apply to their prospective program.

Students wishing to change their program to a non-certification program [Adult and Organizational Development (AOD) or Human Development and Community Engagement (HDCE)] must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.1

Changing Programs Within the College of Education

Students must be in good academic standing in their program to change their major into another program within the College of Education. To change majors within the College of Education, a student must schedule a Change of Program appointment with an Academic Advisor.

Clearances

The College of Education's Clearances Policy requires that all undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in College of Education courses that require fieldwork submit updated copies of the following clearances to the College annually (each summer), via its online platform, EdPortal:

  1. Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Record (Act 34)
  2. Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance (Act 151)
  3. Federal Criminal History Background Check (FBI/fingerprint check) (Act 114), and
  4. P.P.D. (TB) Test (School Health regulations, 28 PA Code, Section 23.44)

For questions about these requirements, contact the Office of Field Placement in the Shimada Resource Center at edfield@temple.edu.

Co-requisites and Prerequisites

Students should be aware of all pre- and co-requisites; they may be administratively dropped from classes for which they do not meet prerequisites and co-requisites. (Candidacy approval is considered a prerequisite to all teaching methods courses.)

Courses Over Five Years Old

Courses over five years old are subject to review to fulfill certification requirements. Courses over ten years old will not count toward program requirements nor certification requirements.

Dean's List

Each fall and spring semester those undergraduates who have met the credit hour and academic criteria for their school or college are placed on the Dean's List. For specific GPA and credit-hour requirements for each college, see the University's Dean's List policy. Dean's List letters are sent from the University Registrar.

Educators' Code of Professional Conduct 

The College of Education at Temple University promotes education as a primary mechanism for social mobility and social justice for all learners. Our mission is to prepare all of our students to be ethical and effective professionals who will employ leading-edge understandings and evidence-based practices in whatever setting they work. In order for us to achieve that mission, we have to have high expectations for our students from the onset of their studies. Our Code of Professional Conduct articulates those expectations and delineates the process the College employs when they are not met. This is a supplement, not a substitution, for the University's Code of Conduct. 

I. Expectations for ethical behaviors in Temple courses include the following:

  1. Students must demonstrate professional responsibility through full participation in all course activities and compliance with academic and attendance policies as described in each course syllabus.
  2. Students must not attend class under the influence of any non-prescribed drugs or medications or alcohol.
  3. Students must manifest respect for others regardless of race, culture, gender, social class, sexual orientation, religion, disability or ability level.  
  4. Students must avoid classroom behaviors that interfere with the learning of others, including, but not limited to, irresponsible use of cell phones, laptops or Ipads, or regularly making negative or disruptive comments.
  5. Students must exhibit a professional level of respect for both professors and classmates and shall not engage in physical intimidation or any other inappropriately aggressive behavior. 
  6. Students must submit only their original work.
  7. Students must obtain permission to use and shall give appropriate citations for any work of another person used in her/his assignments, including classmates.
  8. Students shall not submit work done for another class without the express approval of an instructor.
  9. Students must comply with all fair use and copyright requirements when installing and using software on any computer.
  10. Students must use electronic communication in a responsible and professional manner at all times and shall not display, send, or forward any sexually explicit or other inappropriate materials or any harassing or discriminatory communications. 
  11. Students must not falsify or misrepresent any information to faculty, supervising teachers, and university supervisors. 

II.   Expectations for ethical behavior in field placements include the following:

  1. Students must adhere to Pennsylvania's Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators (http://www.pacode.com/secure/data/022/chapter235/chap235toc.html). 
  2. Students must comply with all policies, statutes, rules and procedures established by Temple University, state and local agencies, and any school or other institution in which the student is doing any field experience. 
  3. Students must treat supervising teachers; other school faculty, administrators, and staff; university supervisors; and their own students with respect at all times.  
  4. Student shall recognize, respect, and plan for the diversity that exists in the classroom and greater community.
  5. The student shall develop and adhere to appropriate professional boundaries in all relationships. Developing a romantic and/or sexual relationship with a student, instructor, staff member, or supervisor is unacceptable.
  6. Students must exhibit a professional commitment to their work in schools and must not demonstrate unprofessional behavior through poorly prepared lessons, unprofessional appearance, or low expectations for self and others.
  7. Students must not attend field assignments under the influence of any non-prescribed drugs or medications or alcohol.
  8. Students shall become knowledgeable about and abide by rules set forth by all schools in which they are doing field experience.

Graduation without Certification

Only students who have successfully completed all requirements other than those requirements indicated in the 8th semester of a student's 8-semester academic plan are eligible to petition to graduate without certification.  

  • Students enrolled in a teacher certification program who have completed  all academic requirements other than those listed in the 8th semester who cannot complete student teaching for any reason must meet with the Office of Field Placement and also with an Academic Advisor to 1) review reasons for petitioning to graduate without certification, 2) develop an alternate academic plan and, 3) complete the Graduation without Certification Petition.
  • Students enrolled in a teacher certification program who have decided they no longer wish to pursue teacher certification, but who have not completed  all requirements other than student teaching and senior seminar are not eligible to Graduate without Certification. Such students are advised to meet with an Academic Advisor to discuss a Change of Program to a non-certification program within the College of Education or external options. This path is not recommended as it will add time to a student's degree.

Field Experience

Students in teacher education programs should be aware there are numerous processes and policies governing field placements, all of which can be found in the current year's Teacher Education Field Handbook and on the Office of Field Placement web site.

Grievances

Students with grievances must first address his or her concern with the professor to seek a resolution. When a resolution cannot be achieved, the student should contact the Ombudsperson to begin the formal Appeal process: education.ombudsperson@temple.edu.

College of Education students with grade grievances in courses outside of the College of Education must follow the process in the College/School who manages the course.

Letters of Completion

Any student who has 1) successfully completed all requirements of the degree program and 2) whose degree has been officially conferred by the University Registrar may request a Letter of Completion. As per policy, no Letter of Completion can be provided to a student until after the University's graduation clearance and degree conferral process is completed as per university deadlines. Students may request a Letter of Completion prior to the clearance and conferral process being completed, but should not expect a letter to be generated until after the degree conferral date.

Participation in the College of Education Graduation Ceremony

Commencement ceremonies are intended to be a celebration of the completion of your degree. The College of Education recognizes that due to extenuating circumstances, students who have not yet completed all degree requirements may wish to participate in the University Commencement and/or the College of Education Graduation ceremonies. The following guidelines outline the circumstances under which undergraduate students may be allowed to participate in the College of Education Graduation ceremony.  (For policy related to participation in the University Commencement, students should refer to the University's Petition for Permission for Non-Graduates to Participate in Commencement.)

College of Education students who will complete their degree requirements in a summer or fall semester may petition to participate in the previous spring's (May) College of Education Graduation Ceremony if they have no more than fifteen credits remaining that can be completed that summer or fall.  Students intending to petition must work with an Academic Advisor to develop an academic plan and must submit that academic plan along with a petition to the Academic Advisor. Decisions are at the discretion of the College of Education and factors taken into consideration include, but are not limited to: viability of academic plan, student's academic history, seating availability/capacity of the venue, and timeliness of the petition (see an Academic Advisor for the deadline for petition submission).  

Students may participate in the College of Education Graduation ceremony only once. Students with an approved petition to participate as a non-graduate forfeit their right to participate when they actually complete their degrees, even if they do not attend the ceremony for which their petition was approved.

Petitions will be reviewed by College of Education Administration and students will be notified of the decision via TUmail, and in their Advising Session Reports in TUportal.

Permission to Take Courses At Another Institution

Consistent with University policy, students will not receive transfer credit for courses taken at another institution while they are matriculated (Degree Seeking) at Temple University unless the student is eligible, as per all policies and permission has been obtained prior to taking the course(s). Students must complete the request form which can be found in TUPortal. Communications regarding the request - including final decisions - are sent to students' TUmail accounts. 

Prerequisites

See Co-requisites and Prerequisites, above.

Re-enrollment

A student who has not been registered for one (or more) semesters and who is not on an approved Leave of Absence is no longer an active student as per University policy. Such former students must complete a Re-enrollment Request and submit that request to the school/college in which she wishes to re-enroll. (Students do not submit the request to their former school/college if they wish to switch into a new school/college.)

The College of Education reviews Re-enrollment Requests on a rolling basis and students are alerted of the decision via the e-mail address provided on their Re-enrollment Request form.

University policy dictates that if the student's original curriculum has been updated, the student must re-enroll into the most current curriculum or choose a different current curriculum (major) upon his/her return. This can impact degree requirements, how prior coursework may/may not apply to the current requirements, and expected time to degree. Students approved for re-enrollment must meet with an Academic Advisor to discuss remaining requirements and anticipated graduation date.

University-established deadlines for Re-enrollment Requests are:

  • For the fall semester: August 1*
  • For the spring semester: December 1*
  • For summer sessions: April 1*

Important Note about Transcripts and Holds for Students wishing to Re-enroll:

  • Students who have attended another institution since last enrolled at Temple are required to submit any and all transcripts with the Re-enrollment Request form; failure to submit all transcripts will result in a denial of the re-enrollment request. When transcripts are provided, a review of the request can be conducted. If transcripts are provided after the University-established deadlines noted above, review of the Re-enrollment Request will be at the discretion of the College of Education.
  • Students with any type of hold on their record must clear the hold prior to submitting a Re-enrollment Request; failure to clear all holds will result in a denial of the re-enrollment request. When all holds are cleared, a review of the request will be conducted. If a hold is not cleared until after the University-established deadlines noted above, review of the Re-enrollment Request will be at the discretion of the College of Education.

Repeating a Course

It is recommended that any student who must repeat a course for any reason meet with an Academic Advisor prior to attempting a course for the second time. Academic Advisors will work with the student to identify strategies/resources that may support success and will help the student review his/her academic plan.

Students making a third attempt at a course cannot self-register, they must meet with an Academic Advisor and must submit a petition. Petitions for a third attempt of a course are reviewed and the student is notified of the decision via their TUmail account. Each petition is reviewed individually; submission of a petition does not guarantee approval. Approvals of third attempt petitions may come with stipulations.

Please refer to the University policy on Repeating a Course for further information.

Repeating Student Teaching

Students must meet with the Office of Field Placement to discuss eligibility to repeat student teaching after failing it. Students are only allowed to take student teaching and the affiliated seminar a total of two times. The Office of Field Placement determines eligibility for repeating student teaching.

Student Teaching

Students in teacher education programs should be aware there are numerous processes and policies governing student teaching, all of which can be found in the current year's Teacher Education Handbook.

Temple University Requirements

  • All students must complete Temple University's General Education (GenEd) curriculum. 
  • All students must take a minimum of two writing-intensive courses at Temple University (including transfer students).

Teacher Certification/Education Programs: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree

Early Childhood-Elementary Education (with or without the Special Education Concentration), Middle Grades Education, Secondary Education, and Career and Technical Education

Areas of Certification within the College of Education1

All curricula leading to Pennsylvania certification are organized to meet the standards established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The following areas of certification have been approved by Temple University's Board of Trustees and the Pennsylvania Department of Education

  • Career and Technical Education
    • Business, Computer, and Information Technology Education K-12 (Formerly Business Education)
    • Cooperative Education
    • Marketing Education K-12
    • Industrial (Career Technical) Education
  • Early Childhood-Elementary Education (Pre K to 4)
    • Early Childhood-Elementary Education (Pre K to 4) with Special Education (Pre K to 8) Concentration
  • Middle Grades Education (grades 4 to 8)
    • Mathematics
    • Science
    • Language Arts
    • Social Studies
    • Mathematics and Science
    • Mathematics and Language Arts
    • Science and Language Arts
  • Secondary Education (grades 7-12)
    • English
    • Mathematics
    • Science
    • Social Studies
  • K-12 Certification in World Languages
    • Chinese
    • French
    • German
    • Italian
    • Latin
    • Spanish

College of Education Graduation Requirements

Students receive a Bachelor of Science in Education degree by meeting the following minimum requirements:

  • Completion of program requirements as detailed on the 8-semester academic plan.2
  • Earn a "C-" or above in all required Education Courses.
  • Earn a "C-" or above in all required University General Education Courses.

Just because a student has reached the minimum credits required for a degree does not mean they have completed the degree as the student may have taken additional courses that are credits not applicable to the program. Some credits from ROTC and preparatory/remedial courses do not count towards the total number of semester hours needed to graduate.

College of Education Certification Requirements

Candidacy

Students in teacher certification programs are admitted to Temple University and enrolled in the College of Education where they take foundation courses required. To move into upper level teaching methods courses, Pennsylvania State legislation mandates that all students must be formally admitted into the Teacher Education Certification portion of their program through an application process; this process is referred to at the College of Education as "Candidacy". Students complete and submit a Candidacy application at the midway point of their education (for most programs this occurs in the fourth semester of courses) and must meet all Candidacy criteria (thereby earning Candidacy approval) before they are able to progress into teaching methods courses and ultimately, student teaching.

Students cannot register for teaching methods courses or the student teaching experience without achieving Candidacy. 

Candidacy requirements include:

  • Pass Basic Skills Assessment tests in Reading, Writing and Math as stipulated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students should consult the PDE web site as testing guidelines and scores are subject to change by the PDE.
  • Complete all courses stipulated on the eight-semester plan as pre-Candidacy courses, earning a C- or higher in each.
  • In general, students must have successfully completed at least six credits of college-level math to be approved for Candidacy. Developmental courses, pre-College courses, MATH 0701, and MATH 0702 are not applicable to this requirement.
  • In general, students must have successfully completed at least six credits of college-level English to be approved for Candidacy, specifically 3 credits of composition and 3 credits of literature. Developmental courses, pre-College courses, ENG 0701, and ENG 0711 are not applicable to this requirement.
  • Earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00. (Students whose GPA is below a 3.00, but above a 2.80 may be eligible for a GPA appeal and should schedule an appointment with an Academic Advisor to discuss this.)
    • Secondary Education students must also earn a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA in the second major area. Students must earn a minimum of "C-" (or higher, where stipulated by the program) in all content area courses.
    • Middle Grades students must also earn a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA in the concentration area. Students must earn a minimum of "C-" (or higher, where stipulated by the program) in all concentration area courses.

Certification Requirements

All students seeking to graduate with the recommendation for Pennsylvania teacher certification must meet the following requirements: 

  • Must complete the minimum number of credits at Temple as specified by the University.
  • Earn a "C-" or above in all required Education Courses. (Students must be aware that the State of Pennsylvania requires a minimum cumulative GPA for teacher certification (see above); obtaining the minimum grade of "C-" in multiple courses will not create a cumulative GPA sufficient to obtain certification.)
  • Earn a "C-" or above in all University General Education Courses.
  • Certification Testing
    • Pass Basic Skills Assessment tests in Reading, Writing and Math as stipulated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students should consult the PDE web site as testing guidelines and scores are subject to change by the PDE.
    • Pass
      • PECT PreK-4 (Early Childhood Education)
      • PECT PreK-4 and SPED PK-8 (dual Early Childhood Education and Special Education)
      • Praxis II Content Area Exams (Middle Grades, Secondary Education, and Career and Technical Education programs)
  • Complete six credits of college-level math as specified by your program. Developmental courses, pre-College courses, MATH 0701, and MATH 0702 are not applicable to this requirement.
  • Complete six credits of college-level English, specifically 3 credits of composition and 3 credits of literature. Developmental courses, pre-College courses, ENG 0701, and ENG 0711 are not applicable to this requirement.
  • Secondary Education students: earn a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA in the content area. Students must earn a minimum of "C-" (or higher, where stipulated by the program) in all content area courses.
  • Middle Grades students: earn a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA in the concentration area. Students must earn a minimum of "C-" (or higher, where stipulated by the program) in all concentration area courses.
  • Students not obtaining Pennsylvania State Teacher certification within five years of completing their programs may need to take additional coursework before the College of Education will consider recommending them for certification.

Students can find further details and updates about all certification on the College of Education web site.

GPA Information as it Relates to Certification

Graduation from the College of Education does not carry automatic endorsement for state certification. Students must complete all the requirements for their specific Teacher Education Certification Program, including: successfully complete student teaching, earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0, and must pass all required certification tests (or must meet the Pennsylvania Department of Education's Certification Testing and Scores requirements.)

Field Experience, Practicum and Student Teaching

The College of Education places a great deal of emphasis on students' in-school experiences. All undergraduates are required to complete courses that place them in school settings for a specified duration. Student teaching, completed in a student's final semester, constitutes the most important field experience for prospective teachers. Students in teacher education programs should be aware there are numerous processes and policies governing field placements and student teaching, all of which can be found in the current year's Teacher Education Field Handbook and on the Office of Field Placement web site.

Performance Assessments

In addition to the teacher certification tests (Basic Skills Assessments and PECT/Praxis II Content Area tests) required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, students are required to complete three performance assessments in order to gauge the extent to which they:

  1. Know the content they will teach,
  2. Can teach the content, and           
  3. Embody the professional attributes required of professional educators.

The performance assessments occur at three points in the undergraduate program: initially when prospective students are being admitted to certification programs through Candidacy; in the junior year, prior to student teaching (intermediate assessment); and before graduation, while student teaching (senior assessment). In addition to assessing and informing candidates about their teaching, the performance assessments are intended for use by faculty as a tool for program evaluation.

All undergraduate Education majors seeking certification must successfully complete the Intermediate Performance Assessment (IPA), a Temple University and PA Department of Education requirement for teacher education majors before student teaching. Under state guidelines, a teacher education institution must:

  1. Conduct performance assessments throughout the preparation program for all students admitted to a professional educator (certification) program
  2. Use the assessment information to determine eligibility for student teaching.

The Intermediate Performance Assessment (IPA) was developed in response to a regulation of the Pennsylvania Department of Education and as part of the College of Education's interest in ensuring teacher candidates' continuous progress in the teacher education certification program. The Temple IPA, like College of Education courses, is aligned to the program's six standards of effective teaching. At the completion of the teacher education program, teacher candidates will have had instruction to help them meet all of these standards in their teaching practice. The IPA measures progress toward these standards part way through the program; students must complete and pass this formal assessment to be eligible to student teach.

The IPA is followed by the Senior Performance Assessment (SPA) in the final semester of the program. All candidates for certification must successfully complete the Intermediate and Senior Performance Assessments. This is both a Temple University and PA Department of Education requirement for teacher education majors. Candidates for certification will not be submitted to the state as having met all requirements if they fail either the IPA or SPA twice.

Professional Education Portfolio

As a culmination of the teacher education certification program, students will be required to develop a professional teaching portfolio. The specific requirements for the portfolio will be available from the Senior Seminar course instructor.

Programs that do not lead to Teacher Certification: Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science

Adult and Organizational Development (BA) and Human Development and Community Engagement (BS)

Students receive a Bachelor of Arts degree by meeting the following minimum College requirements:

  • Completion of program requirements as detailed on the 8-semester matrix.
  • Earn a "C-" or above in all required Education Courses.
  • Earn a "C-" or above in all required University General Education Courses.
  • Earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  • Earn the minimum credits required for the degree.

Minors & Certificates

Minors

  • Minor in Education
  • Minor in Adult and Organizational Development

Certificates

  • Certificate in Diversity and Inclusion
  • Certificate in English Language Teaching
  • Certificate in Leadership & Military Science

Academic Advising Information

150 Ritter Annex
1301 Cecil B. Moore Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-8011 (phone)
215-204-4383 (fax)
Undergraduate Academic and Student Affairs / Advising
edadvising@temple.edu

Undergraduate Academic Advising Services

The Undergraduate Academic and Student Affairs staff in the College of Education works with students in a variety of areas. The department offers the following services:

  • Collaboration with students to develop individual academic plans
  • Freshmen and Transfer Orientations and advising
  • Academic planning and advising to support student success and on-time graduation
  • Advising for students facing academic challenges
  • Change of Program workshops (online) and individual advising for students interested in changing into a College of Education program (major)
  • Petitions
  • Workshops
  • Candidacy applications
  • Information and processes for teacher education students regarding Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) guidelines and requirements
  • Student Teaching and pre-graduation audits
  • Graduation clearances
  • Registration assistance

Undergraduate Advising Appointment Scheduling

  • Schedule online via the Student Tools tab in TUPortal, call 215-204-8011, or stop into the Shimada Resource Center. 

Academic Responsibility Policy

See more under the College of Education Policies page in this Bulletin.

Faculty

For additional information on the College of Education's faculty please visit the College's faculty directory.

Quaiser Abdullah, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Gregory Anderson, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., City University of New York.

Saul Axelrod, Professor Emeritus, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Florida State University.

Janelle M. Bailey, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Arizona.

Cynthia S. Belliveau, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Julie L. Booth, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University.

Jean A. Boyer, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.

Joseph Boyle, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Carol B. Brandt, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of New Mexico.

Wanda M. Brooks, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

James P. Byrnes, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Corrinne A. Caldwell, Professor Emerita, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Robert W. Clark, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Sarah A. Cordes, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., New York University.

Maia Bloomfield Cucchiara, Associate Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

James Earl Davis, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Meixia Ding, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Joseph P. DuCette, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Richard M. Englert, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ed.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Armando X. Estrada, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Texas at El Paso.

Frank H. Farley, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., University of London.

Edward Fergus, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Catherine A. Fiorello, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Kentucky.

Amanda G. Fisher, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Judith Flanigan, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Joseph P. Folger, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Timothy P. Fukawa-Connelly, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Maryland.

Allison Gilmour, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.

Sara Goldrick-Rab, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Steven Jay Gross, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

John Hall, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Insook Han, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., Columbia University, Teachers College.

Shanta Hattikudur, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Joseph Haviland, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., Temple University.

Annemarie H. Hindman, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Heidi Hutman, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Albany.

Jennifer Johnson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.

Will J. Jordan, Associate Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., Columbia University, Teachers College.

Avshalom Kaplan, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Novella E. Keith, Associate Professor Emerita, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Julie Beth Kessler, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Larry J. Krafft, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Peshe C. Kuriloff, Professor (Practice), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College.

Janice C. Laurence, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., George Mason University.

Doug Lombardi, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Christopher W. McGinley, Associate Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Kristina Najera, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Delaware.

Sabina Neugebauer, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., Harvard University.

Kristie Jones Newton, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.

Timothy J. Patterson, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Columbia University, Teachers College.

Laura Pendergast, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Ivan J. Quandt, Professor Emeritus, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., Indiana University.

Elizabeth Richard, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Lia E. Sandilos, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Jayminn S. Sanford-DeShields, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., Harvard University.

Kenneth G. Schaefer, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Catherine C. Schifter, Associate Professor Emerita, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

W. Joel Schneider, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Joan Poliner Shapiro, Professor Emerita, Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Lori A. Shorr, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Michael W. Smith, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Tamara Sniad, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Judith C. Stull, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, College of Education; Ph.D., Boston College.

Francis J. Sullivan, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Jill May Swavely, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., Temple University.

S. Kenneth Thurman, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.

Matthew J. Tincani, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Renee M. Tobin, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Gregory M. Tucker, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Matthew J. Elvis Wagner, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., Columbia University, Teachers College.

Barbara A. Wasik, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Meredith Weber, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Diana L. Wildermuth, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education; Ph.D., Temple University.

Christine A. Woyshner, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education; Ed.D., Harvard University.