Boyer College of Music & Dance

Founded 1962

Dr. Robert T. Stroker, Dean
2001 N. 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-8301
boyer@temple.edu 
www.temple.edu/boyer

Mission

The Boyer College of Music and Dance is committed to nurturing and advancing music as a form of human expression, as an art, and as a subject for intellectual inquiry. Recognizing that music possesses unique powers -- to move the spirit, to excite the mind, to reveal the past, to chart the future, to instruct, to heal, and to foster communication -- the college seeks to perpetuate music in its myriad forms through creative and scholarly work, teaching, and service, according to the highest artistic and academic standards.

As an integral part of Temple University, the Boyer College shares the ideals of Russell Conwell upon which Temple was founded: to recognize talent and personal potential wherever they may be found; to provide educational opportunities for meritorious students of limited financial means; and to serve as a constructive presence in the wider Philadelphia community.

In carrying out its mission, the Boyer College seeks both to continue the long tradition of artistry and scholarship that we have inherited and to develop new insights, perspectives, and practices. This dual objective -- to explore both past and future, old and new -- should be broadly reflected in the life of the college: in curricula and instruction; institutional policy; professional activities of faculty; advisement of students; and musical performances.

For the art of music to remain vital, our culture must develop both highly-trained, professional musicians and informed, perceptive listeners. Accordingly, the college recognizes its responsibility to administer professional education to the student seeking a career in music, provide opportunities for the general university student to study and experience music, and share its musical life with the public.

The Boyer College provides a distinctive union of the best conservatory-type training with intense academically-oriented classroom teaching. Coupled with the performance opportunities of the university and the culturally-rich Philadelphia area, the Boyer College offers students the competitive edge in complete, comprehensive musical preparation. Many programs throughout the university offer minors. Students who wish to pursue a minor outside of music should contact the appropriate department.

Accreditation

National Association of Schools of Music, National Association of Schools of Dance, Middle States Association, National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, Pennsylvania Department of Education, and American Music Therapy Association.

Music Admissions

The following requirements for admission to the college are to be considered minimal. Applicants who pass the following examinations may be recommended to the Director of Admissions as eligible for admission to the college. In addition, candidates must meet general requirements set by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

  • An audition in the major performing medium must be completed before an applicant can be accepted into the Boyer College of Music and Dance.
  • After submitting the completed application, the applicant is responsible for scheduling his/her audition. E-mail music@temple.edu to schedule your audition. Refer to Boyer College for audition dates, pre-screening requirements, and audition requirements.
  • The freshman application deadline is March 1. Applications for admission to the spring semester must be received no later than November 1. 
  • If the applicant is unable to be present because of distance, applicants should upload a video audition to Decision Desk. Refer to Boyer College for specific video audition details.
  • Prescreening audition recordings are required for jazz guitar; prescreening portfolio submissions are required for the B.M. Composition program.
  • B.S. Music applicants must submit a statement of goals to music@temple.edu, and take a theory test.

Dance Admissions

Admission into the dance program requires the submission of four items:

  • A general university application submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
  • Official transcripts / standardized test scores submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
  • A dance application submitted to the Department of Dance.
  • Attendance at an audition located on Temple University Main Campus in Philadelphia, or other arrangements to complete the audition requirements.

A dance audition cannot be scheduled until all other required application materials have been submitted. Please note that Temple University will not make an admission decision until applicants attend a dance audition.

The dance audition consists of technique classes divided into sections of ballet, modern, and African dance; a one minute solo of an applicant's own choreography; and an interview. The faculty attempts to choose students with physical, artistic, and intellectual potential to enter and complete the dance program and the university curriculum. The faculty is concerned that potential students' goals and aspirations are supported by the department philosophy, maximizing success in the program.

For additional information regarding dance admissions and for an application, please visit Boyer Admissions.

Transfer Credits

In addition to the university's statement regarding transfer credit (see Transfer Students), the Boyer College of Music and Dance will, during New Student Orientation, determine all transferred music credits through placement exams. Where deemed necessary, students may be tested in music theory, music history, and secondary piano. Tests in other music areas may be arranged through individual departments.

Financial Aid

See Financial Aid in the Bulletin.

Financial aid is available to full-time undergraduates in the form of music grants, academic scholarships, loans, grants, music grants-in-aid, and work-study programs. No separate application is necessary.  

Music Grants are awarded based on merit. The Boyer College has application and audition deadlines for priority music scholarship consideration. No separate application is required. 

Entering Student Scholarships are offered by the Dance Department following successful entrance auditions and are based on artistic talent and potential for success in the dance curriculum. No separate application is necessary. 

Financial aid awards are made after the student has been admitted as a fully-matriculated student. Students are to be enrolled full-time, unless prior permission is granted to do otherwise by the Associate Dean.

Music and Dance scholarships and awards for currently enrolled and graduating undergraduate and graduate students include, but are not limited, to the following:

Voice/Opera
Florence Berggren Voice Scholarship
Philip Y. Cho Voice Scholarship Fund
John T. Douglas Award for Young Artists
Else Fink Memorial Scholarship
Professor Robert Grooters Memorial Scholarship
Klara Meyers Scholarship
Morton C. Meyers Memorial Scholarship
Sidney and Mindelle Weinberg Voice Scholarship

Choral Conducting
Robert Page Graduate Choral Conducting Scholarship

Music Therapy
Anni Baker Scholarship in Music Therapy

Instrumental
Max Aronoff Prize
Stuart J. Best Memorial Scholarship
Fred Schrader Memorial Scholarship Fund
Elizabeth Smith String Scholarship
Glenn Steele Percussion Scholarship

Keyboard
Olga Gagliardi Getto Award
Jacobs Music Company Steinway Award
Louis and Peter Vennett Scholarship

Jazz
Paul Beller Memorial Scholarship
David M. Katz Scholarship
Julian F. King Jazz Studies Award
Billy Strayhorn Jazz Education Scholarship Award

Diamond Band
H. E. Pike Memorial Award

Music Studies
Bruce Archibald Memorial Fund
Dr. B. Stimson Carrow Award
Dr. Milton J. Sutter, Jr. Memorial Award

Music Education
Dorothy Albert Bogusz Scholarship
Ruth M. Lafferty Memorial Award
Frances G. Lumsden Memorial Scholarship
William T. and Carmen T. Middleberg Scholarship

General
Irving Berlin Scholarship
Esther Boyer Scholarship Fund
Elaine Brown Tribute Fund
Dr. Jeffrey M. Cornelius Tribute Fund Award
Rida C. Davis Memorial Scholarship
Douty Foundation Scholarship
Richard M. Duris Scholarship for Excellence in Classical Music
Elizabeth K. Frescoln Award
Frances Hutton Memorial Award
Helen Laird Tribute Award
Dr. Arthur Bennett Lipkin Memorial Fund
Esther M. Schultz Award
William M. Singer Memorial
Alice Tully Scholarship
David L. Stone Tribute Scholarship
E. M. Yarnell Scholarship
Boyer College Alumni Association Award
Dr. Jeffrey M. Cornelius Tribute Fund Award
Edwin B. Garrigues Scholarships
Jill D. Hamm Memorial Scholarship
Michael S. Kavalhuna Scholarship
New School Scholarship
Presser Foundation Scholarships
Janet M. Yamron Scholarship

Dance
Terese Benzwie Dance in Education Award
Frances Bowden Scholarship
The Katherine Dunham Award for Creative Dance Research
Edrie Ferdun Award
Sarah Hilsendager Award
Rose Vernick Award

Special Programs

Music Technology Component

In addition to coursework leading to Bachelor's degrees in Music, the Boyer College of Music and Dance offers a 36-credit component in Music Technology to qualified music majors. This component, which is distributed over a student's freshman through senior years, normally results in a five-year program.

The music technology component provides a structured sequence of courses for those students who desire to use new technologies to enhance their skills as performers, composers, teachers, and scholars. Courses focus on the creative, performance, and pedagogical aspects of music technology. Students interested in adding the component to their curriculum should contact their respective chair for further information and specific curriculum guidelines.

Music Preparatory Division and Community Music Scholars Program of the Boyer College of Music and Dance

Mark Huxsoll, Director
www.temple.edu/boyer/community/music-prep/index.asp
215-204-1512

Temple Music Prep provides lifelong, non-credit learning opportunities in music and dance to the Greater Philadelphia community and surrounding areas. As a division of Temple University’s Boyer College of Music and Dance, Music Prep is uniquely able to combine university expertise with Philadelphia’s outstanding cultural assets, assuring excellence in experience and results.

Programming includes Early Childhood Music Foundations beginning with newborns through 4 years of age, Movement and Dance Classes for children 3 years old through teens, individual instruction in all instruments and voice for children and adults, and classes specially designed for adults. Music Prep is also an authorized provider of Act 48 credits for Pennsylvania educators.

A major component is the Center for Gifted Young Musicians, which serves those students with exceptional ability and motivation. The Community Music Scholars Program serves students with need from over fifty public schools, allowing access to affordable quality instruction.

Temple Music Prep is a member of the National Guild for Community Arts Education and the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance.

Key Program Components

  • Individual lessons from an outstanding faculty in orchestral instruments, piano, guitar, voice, composition and jazz techniques are offered for children and adults.

Suzuki instruction in violin, cello, guitar, and piano is also offered for young children. In the "talent education method" of Dr. Shinichi Suzuki, children learn to play music with the same enjoyment and fluency with which they learn language.

  • Early Childhood Music Foundations is an innovative program in early childhood music education education (newborns through children 4 years of age) that has a national reputation for excellence.  In a carefully planned sequence of music learning, the program uses the natural human inclination for chanting, singing and movement as the first steps in the musical understanding of melody and rhythm.   
  • Movement and Dance classes take children through a sequential, age-specific dance program. Offerings include: Creative Movement (3 & 4 yrs.), Music and Movement (5 yrs. in kindergarten through 7 yrs.), Modern Dance (8 yrs. through teens in three levels) and Ballet Technique (pre-teens & teens).
  • Basic Musicianship classes are offered in three progressive levels. The goal of these classes is to develop musicianship by integrating aural, written, vocal, and tactile skills. By using movable "Do" solfege, students learn to make the connection between musical notation and sound. A one-week summer music theory intensive course is offered for those students preparing to enter a college music degree program.
  • Adult classes are designed to provide opportunities for personal growth and professional development. Offerings include: classes in learning to play piano, learning to play guitar, learning to sing, jazz improvisation, or in Suzuki piano teacher training; participation in a community band or a community choir during the academic year or week-long music workshops offered at the Boyer College;  as well as individual study in instruments and voice. Pennsylvania educators are eligible to receive Act 48 credit for most of these offerings.
  • The Center for Gifted Young Musicians is the component of Music Prep that focuses on the training of exceptionally-gifted students who have the ability and willingness to make a serious commitment to music. By audition only.

Instrumental Division (for strings)
The Center's instrumental program provides a comprehensive package of music instruction and performance for young musicians who have demonstrated the greatest potential for musical achievement. Emphasis in this program is placed on the development of superior musical skills through large and small ensemble performance. The faculty is made up of the finest artist/teachers in the region, including members of The Philadelphia Orchestra and professors from Temple's own Boyer College of Music and Dance.

Young Artists Harp Ensemble
The Young Artists Harp Ensemble offers pedal and lever harp students ages 10 through high school the opportunity to participate in a group ensemble experience with a conductor as well as in student-led chamber music settings. Participants are also eligible to attend monthly studio master classes by Philadelphia Orchestra principal harpist, Elizabeth Hainen at the Boyer College of Music and Dance. Students may also have the opportunity to collaborate with other Temple Music Prep ensemble groups.

The Festival of Young Musicians
The Festival of Young Musicians has long been the centerpiece of the Center for Gifted Young Musicians. Held annually in late April/early May, it consists of a series of concerts throughout the region that feature all the performers in the Center.

  • The Community Music Scholars Program: Upper Division provides weekly individual instruction, music theory and ensemble experience at a nominal fee for young instrumentalists. These Philadelphia school students with need are nominated by their school music teachers and accepted by audition.
  • The Philadelphia String Project at Temple University is aligned with the National String Project Consortium (NSPC) a coalition of String Project sites at universities across the United States that exchange ideas and learn from each other but operate completely independently. The NSPC is dedicated to increasing the number of children playing stringed instruments, addressing the critical shortage of string teachers in the US and supporting public school string programs.  Participating students receive twice weekly instruction taught by a Master Teacher and supported by Temple University undergraduate music education and performance string interns.

The Boyer College of Music Preparatory and Extension Division is located at Temple University's Center City Campus, 1515 Market Street, in the heart of metropolitan Philadelphia at the hub of the Regional Transit System.

For further information concerning curricula and fees, write to:

Temple Music Preparatory Division
1515 Market Street, Suite 501
Philadelphia, PA 19102
e-mail: musicprep@temple.edu
phone: 215-204-1512
web site: www.temple.edu/boyer/community/music-prep/index.asp

Facilities

Presser Hall, opened in 1967, is the center of musical activity at Temple University. This building houses practice rooms, classrooms, ensemble rehearsal rooms, teaching studios, faculty offices, a 16-station computer classroom, student and faculty lounges, a large listening and viewing library, and the Presser Learning Center. Presser Hall's performance facilities include Klein Recital Hall and Arronson Rehearsal Hall.  Presser Hall houses the Music Studies Department, the Music Education Department, the wind, brass, and Percussion programs of the Instrumental Department, the Choral Activities Department, the Department of Voice and Opera, and the programs in Music Therapy and Jazz Studies. Presser Hall is fully Wi-Fi enabled.

The nationally recognized Presser Center for Research and Creativity in Music, located on the first floor of Presser Hall, houses over 6,000 books, recordings, periodicals, videotapes, audio tapes, classroom instruments, and other materials used in the preparation of music teachers and music therapists. Included in the computer classroom is the hardware and software necessary for future teachers and therapists to become knowledgeable about the role of computers in music and administration.

The Presser Hall Listening Library houses a collection of more than 20,000 recordings and tapes, 10,000 compact discs, hundreds of video tapes and DVDs, reference books, and scores. Music listening and viewing assignments for courses in music history, theory, composition, jazz, education, and literature can be completed with this collection, which spans music history and performance from the earliest times to the present. This facility also contains general use computer stations, cell-phone and laptop charging stations, searchable databases of digital audio tracks, iPad stations, and multiple LP/CD/DVD media stations. A larger collection of music books and scores is found in Paley Library.

The Boyer College's Rock Hall was extensively renovated for music and dedicated in 1994 in recognition of the generous support of Dr. Milton Rock and the late Mrs. Shirley Rock. Located at Broad Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue on Temple University's Main Campus, Rock Hall houses the Office of the Dean, the string and chamber music programs of the New School Institute, the programs in Music Composition, the Keyboard Department, the Early Music Program, the Alice Tully Library, three state-of-the-art computer/electronic laboratories for music and dance, practice rooms, classrooms, and a 325-seat chamber music recital hall.  Rock Hall is fully wi-fi enabled. 

The visual video/film scoring studio in Rock Hall features a variety of voice modules controlled by a computer workstation, a multi-channel mixer, 5:1 surround sound, and digital and analog recording facilities. Students are encouraged to design their own libraries of timbres for use in composition. The computer synthesis studio uses several computer workstations with expanded disk memory, digital and analog recording equipment, and a broad range of software for music synthesis. Most hardware and software titles in the Boyer College Computer Labs are identical to those in the new TECH Center's dedicated Music Lab, enabling students to work on projects in multiple venues.

The Boyer College added a 3-story addition to Presser Hall in 2009 which contains 21 additional practice rooms, three large classrooms, teaching studios, administrative offices, the Center for Arts and Quality of Life, and a 24-track ProTools recording studio.

The Boyer College's Department of Dance has its administrative, faculty, institute, and student offices housed in 1700 North Broad Street. Dance classes are held in three large dance studios in Pearson Hall where there are additional support spaces as well as two small teaching studios for smaller groups. Dance classes and performances are held in Conwell Dance Theater in Conwell Hall, a 125-seat black box theater. All Dance Department spaces are wi-fi enabled.

As of the 2011-2012 academic year, the College presents its largest ensembles in performance in the Temple Performing Arts Center. This iconic building – formerly the Baptist Temple of Philadelphia – was specifically converted into a performing arts complex capable of housing a full symphony orchestra and choir. Boyer’s symphony orchestra, choirs, wind symphony, percussion ensemble and other large ensembles all perform in this venue. In addition, the Temple Performing Arts Center is also available to the College for recording sessions, rehearsals, faculty concerts and other significant events.

Also utilized by the Boyer College is the third floor of Mitten Hall where the Temple Opera Theater's rehearsal, administrative and faculty offices are housed along with the Opera Listening and Study Library, and the scene, costume, and prop shops. Tomlinson Theater, located across the street from Presser Hall, is used for on-campus large ensemble performances and for the twice yearly staged opera productions. A 55-seat smart classroom for music and dance instruction is housed in the Tuttleman Learning Center.

The Boyer College is able to loan professional equipment to students in the form of instruments (violins, violas, celli, basses, all woodwinds, all brasses, all percussion), audio gear (JBL, Yamaha and Peavey), portable digital recording units, iPads, and video gear. Also available for use are unique vintage instruments:  Hammond B3 Organ with Leslie Speaker, Fender Rhodes 73 synthesizer, Yamaha and Kurzweil synthesizers.

In July of 2012, the Boyer College of Music and Dance became part of Temple University's Center for the Arts, a comprehensive administrative restructuring of all of the Arts programs on Temple's campus. The combined programs included the Boyer College of Music and Dance, Tyler School of Art, and the Division of Theater, Film and Media Arts. With the oversight of all these areas by the Vice Provost for the Arts and Dean of the Center, Dr. Robert Stroker, the possibilities for collaborations among all of the arts programs on Temple's campus have significantly increased.

In October 2015, the Center for the Arts was renamed the Center for the Performing and Cinematic Arts; the Division of Theater, Film and Media Arts was renamed the School of Theater, Film and Media Arts; and the Tyler School of Art became an independent school.

Student Contact Information

Boyer College of Music and Dance

Robert T. Stroker, Vice Provost for the Center of the Performing and Cinematic Arts
Dean, Boyer College of Music and Dance
Rock Hall
215-204-5004
robert.stroker@temple.edu

Beth Bolton, Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs
Presser Hall
215-204-8097
bbolton@temple.edu

Edward Flanagan, Associate Dean for Student Affairs
Presser Hall
215-204-8301
edward.flanagan@temple.edu

Steven Kreinberg, Vice Dean, Center for the Performing and Cinematic Arts
Rock Hall
215-204-8098
kreinberg@temple.edu

David Brown, Assistant Dean for Administrative Affairs, Center for the Performing and Cinematic Arts
Presser Hall
215-204-8392
dpbrown@temple.edu

Sue Alcedo, Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration, Center for the Performing and Cinematic Arts
Rock Hall
215-204-5191
alcedo@temple.edu

Millie Bai
Presser Hall Listening Library
215-204-5531
millie@temple.edu

Jennifer Bolcar, Administrative Assistant
Presser Hall Office
215-204-5527
jbolcar@temple.edu

Florence Brown-Palmore, Executive Assistant to the Dean
Rock Hall Office
215-204-5527
palmore@temple.edu

Taish Bruton, Administrative Assistant, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy
Presser Hall, Presser Learning Center
215-204-8310
tbruton@temple.edu

Anne Canan, Administrative Specialist
Presser Hall, Main Office
215-204-8301
anne.canan@temple.edu

Molly Clark Davis, Alumni Relations Officer for the Arts and SMC
Temple Administrative Services Building (TASB)
215-926-2226
molly.clarkdavis@temple.edu

Leslie Cochran, Department Coordinator for Vocal Arts
Presser Hall, Rm. 201
215-204-8304
cochranl@temple.edu

Lesley Copans, Academic Advisor
200 Mitten Hall West Balcony
215-204-8372
lcopans@temple.edu

Barbara DiToro, Associate Director, Temple Music Prep
Temple University Center City
1515 Market Street, 5th Floor
215-204-1512
musicprep@temple.edu

Bart Dunn, Instrumental and Jazz Coordinator
Presser Hall
215-204-8306
bart.dunn@temple.edu

Linda Fiore, Director of Marketing and Communications
Rock Hall
215-204-8307
linda.fiore@temple.edu

Norma Porter, Dance Admissions Representative
1700 N. Broad Street, Suite 309C
215-204-0533
norma.anthony@temple.edu

Anne Harlow, College Subject Specialist
Paley Library
215-204-1399
aharlow@temple.edu

Dara Boyd, Assistant Director of Marketing and Communications
Rock Hall
215-204-8117
dboyd@temple.edu

Jason Horst, Director of Operations, Center for the Performing and Cinematic Arts
Tyler Dean's Suite
215-204-8391
jhorst@temple.edu

Nanette Hudson Joyce, Associate Director, Conwell Dance Theater
1700 N. Broad Street, Suite 309
215-204-6177
njoyce@temple.edu

Mark Huxsoll, Director, Temple Music Prep
Temple University Center City
1515 Market Street, 5th Floor
215-204-1512
musicprep@temple.edu

Sandy James, Systems Support Specialist and Webmaster
Rock Hall
215-204-2538
sandra.james@temple.edu

James Johnson, Producer, Temple Opera Theater
Mitten Hall, 3rd Floor
215-204-8641
jamied@temple.edu

Joann Kirchner, Keyboard Office
Rock Hall, Room 222
215-204-7388
joann.kirchner@temple.edu

Melissa Douglas, Registrar/Lesson Coordinator and Community Music Scholars Coordinator, Temple University Prep
Temple University Center City
1515 Market Street, 5th Floor
215-204-1180
mdouglas@temple.edu

Scott Reynolds, Executive Director of Development for the Arts
Temple Administrative Services Building (TASB)
215-926-2586
scottrey@temple.edu

Eric Schweingruber, Director of Instrumental Ensembles
Presser Hall, Room 129
215-204-8306
eschwein@temple.edu

Gloria Scott, Dance Department Coordinator
1700 N. Broad Street, Suite 309
215-204-5169
gscott71@temple.edu 

James Short, Assistant Dean for Admissions and Recruitment
Presser Hall, Room 127
215-204-8598
jshort@temple.edu

Matthew Schillizzi, Associate Director of Admissions and Recruitment
Presser Hall
215-204-6810
schillizzi@temple.edu

Tara Webb-Duey, Director of Development
Rock Hall, Main Office
215-204-0106
tara.webb-duey@temple.edu

For university-wide academic policies, refer to Undergraduate Academic Policies.

Note that the policies for music students and dance students are listed in separate sections below.

Boyer College Policies for Music Students

Students are responsible for complying with all university-wide academic policies as well as those of the Boyer College of Music and Dance that appear below.

Dean's List

Each fall and spring semester, those undergraduates who have met the credit hour and academic criteria for their school or college are placed on the Dean's List. See the Dean's List policy for specific GPA and credit-hour requirements.

Band Camp and Choir Retreat Policy 

Each fall, prior to the opening of school, the Temple University Marching Band holds its annual band camp. In addition to having a concentrated four-day work period to prepare for the coming season, students get to know each other in both a working and social relationship. They also become acquainted with the group directors at both the personal and professional levels. Attendance at band camp is mandatory for group participation.

The Temple University Concert Choir often meets a few days prior to fall classes or during the first weekend of fall classes for extensive rehearsals.

Ensemble Requirements

  • Undergraduate students with a major or concentration in voice or keyboard are required to participate in a choral ensemble, as determined by the Director of Choral Activities, throughout the undergraduate degree program where indicated by the curriculum. Participation begins in the first semester and continues until a baccalaureate degree is obtained. The requirement is waived during the semester of senior recital, internship, or student teaching.
  • Music Education/Jazz majors whose concentration is voice are required to participate in both classical and jazz vocal ensembles. After advisement to determine which kind of ensemble is appropriate, these students should go to the Director of Choral Activities to be placed in a classical ensemble and to the Director of Jazz Studies to be placed in a jazz ensemble.
  • Undergraduate students with a major or concentration in strings are required to play in the Temple University Symphony Orchestra. Participation begins in the first semester and continues until a baccalaureate degree is obtained. Qualified jazz strings and upright bass students are required to audition. This requirement is waived during the semester of student teaching or internship.
  • All woodwind, brass, and percussion performance majors and/or concentrations must audition for instrumental ensembles, large and small, at the beginning of the fall semester for placement during the academic year. Continuing students will audition for ensemble placement through juries at the end of each semester. New students will audition for ensemble placement at the beginning of the first semester of study.
  • Music education majors whose principal instrument is woodwind, brass, or percussion are required to play in the marching band for one semester, normally during the fall semester of the freshman and sophomore years. Transfer students in this category must also register for Marching Band for one semester unless they can show evidence of equivalent undergraduate experience at another college or university as determined by the Director of Bands.
  • All students taking private lessons (major or concentration) or Recital Extensions are required to participate in an ensemble each semester in attendance.
  • Percussion majors are required to participate in Percussion Ensemble.
  • Any instrumental student who does not play for a private lesson jury at the end of each semester must arrange for an audition for ensemble placement for the succeeding semester with the Department of Instrumental Studies.
  • Students may perform in more than two ensembles only with permission of their advisor.
  • All students must show evidence of ensemble experience in their performance medium.
  • All students who are registered for applied and concentration lessons must arrange their schedules in order to attend regularly-scheduled master/studio classes. Failure to do so may result in the lowering of the applied lesson grade.

Independent Study Policy  

Independent Study provides a special opportunity for juniors and seniors to work in a highly-individualized setting with one or more faculty members.

Those who wish to design an Independent Study project must prepare a written proposal six months in advance of the semester in which the study is to be accomplished. This proposal is then submitted for the approval of a special Honors subcommittee of the Academic Planning and Review Committee, which includes the dean and associate dean. Private lessons beyond those required in the curriculum are not an appropriate form of Independent Study.

Professional Development Policy 

All students in the college, in addition to passing the required subjects toward their degrees, are obligated to serve in a number of capacities in order to enrich their academic and musical expertise. The Boyer College believes that such experiences give impetus to successful professional careers. Among the duties that may be required are conducting laboratory classes, tutoring, teaching private lessons, coaching, participating in the distribution and inventory control of university-owned musical instruments and instructional materials, participating in ensembles, accompanying, supervising performance classes, performing at admission and open house events, and other academically-related activities. The Boyer College performances must be given priority over non-college commitments.

Instrumental Jury Policy

All instrumental students, both performance majors and instrumental concentration students, must play a jury at the conclusion of each semester to show evidence of progress on their instrument. For string performance majors, the jury at the end of the sophomore year is the 'Junior Standing Jury,' which must be successfully passed in order for the student to continue in the performance program.

Recital and Concert Attendance Policy

The dean and faculty of the Boyer College of Music and Dance consider recital and concert attendance to be a significant educational activity in the training of a musician. It is largely through the process of active listening that the young musician develops powers of discrimination and critical judgment with relation to musical performance. Therefore, attendance at a minimum of sixteen college recitals or concerts throughout the course of an academic year is mandatory for full-time undergraduate students. A maximum of 56 recitals is needed to complete the requirement. Of the eight required recitals attended in each semester by full-time students, one must be an official Boyer College World Music Recital or Multicultural Music Lecture-Performance. Part-time, matriculated undergraduate students are also responsible for attending a specific number of concerts with the same World Music Recital or Multicultural Music Lecture-Performance requirement. For part-time students the number of required recitals in a semester will be in a direct ratio to the number of credits for which they are registered. During student teaching, therapy internship, or senior recital, this requirement is waived. The requirement for full-time transfer students will be based on the number of semesters they attended the Boyer College. Failure to comply with this ruling may result in delay of graduation from the college.

Senior Recital Policy 

Students in the following curriculums are required to perform a senior recital:

  • Piano Performance
  • Piano Pedagogy
  • Instrumental Performance
  • Voice Performance
  • Jazz Instrumental Performance
  • Jazz Voice Performance
  • Jazz Arranging/Composition

The senior recital provides the opportunity for the performance major to display his or her development and potential as a professional musician and should be considered the focal point for the semesters of private lessons which precede it. Before the senior recital is scheduled, the student

  1. must have successfully completed private lessons during each semester prior to the recital and
  2. must have achieved senior status academically

All grades of "incomplete" in private lessons must be cleared before the student may apply for the senior recital. Students should refer to the Boyer College of Music and Dance Undergraduate Handbook for further details and policies governing recitals.

After receiving approval from the jury and the major teacher in the applied area, a student should apply for the Senior Recital date and complete the necessary recital arrangements through the recital coordinator.

For students enrolled in the Instrumental Studies Department, the recital approval jury serves to demonstrate the student's ability to perform the degree recital successfully. Normally, this occurs at the preceding semester's jury. If by departmental approval this jury does not occur, then a jury must be scheduled at least four weeks prior to the recital. If the jury is not successfully completed by that time, the Instrumental Studies Department reserves the right to cancel the recital date. Most of the recital repertoire, with the exception of chamber ensemble works, should be available for performance at the jury and accompanied by the recital accompanist. Recital approval is dependent upon the time remaining between the approval jury and the actual recital date, as well as the degree of preparedness of the repertoire.

Except for non-sonata and complicated contemporary repertoire, string performance majors should perform from memory (and the recital program should include some portion that will be performed from memory). Students who wish an exception to this memorization policy must obtain prior approval from the department by indicating the request on the recital repertoire form when it is submitted to the department for approval of the program.

Senior Recitals are usually presented Monday through Friday at 5:15 PM or 7:30 PM. Performance time should be 45 to 50 minutes, exclusive of an optional intermission of no more than 10 minutes.

Recital Extension Policy 

Some students may need to extend their applied study beyond the required number of semesters in order to complete the preparation for the Senior Recital. Students who do not present a recital during the recital semester will receive the grade of "Incomplete" and must register for MUSC 5000 for 2 semester hours of non-degree credit. Recital Extension must be taken each semester until the recital has been presented. The sole exceptions to this rule are as follows:

  • Students who give their recitals during the first three weeks of the spring semester are not required to register for Recital Extension that semester.
  • Students who register for Recital Extension or for private lessons during the summer may give their recitals during the first three weeks of the fall semester. However, if a student does not register for either Recital Extension or lessons during the summer, he or she may not present the recital in the fall semester -- regardless of the date -- without also registering for that semester of lessons or Recital Extension.
  • Private applied lessons beyond the eight-semester requirement currently in effect for undergraduate performance majors may be taken by permission of the jury and/or the appropriate performance department chairman. MUSC 5000 carries a $500 fee (subject to change without notice). Tuition scholarships do not cover this private lesson fee.

Program Performance Policy  

All music departments reserve the right to dismiss an undergraduate student at any time from a given undergraduate degree program, regardless of grade point average, if in the opinion of the major department, he or she is unable to meet departmental standards. The decision will receive automatic review by the Academic Review and Planning Committee. The student has the right to appeal the dismissal to the Academic Review and Planning Committee of the Boyer College of Music and Dance.

Undergraduate Private Lesson Policy  

Weekly one-hour private lessons are arranged for full-time matriculated undergraduates in the Boyer College for as many semesters as required by the particular curriculum. (A full-time student must be registered for at least 12 credits each semester.) A per semester lesson fee of $250 (subject to change without notice) -- above and beyond the regular tuition -- will be automatically added to the tuition charge of each student for this study. Students who do not complete a minimum of 12 semester hours must pay a private lesson fee of $500 for the succeeding semester of private lessons. Students who are accepted for a double concentration or a double major in performance must be fully accepted by both departments by audition. A private lesson fee of $500 is assessed for the second instrument. Approval of the associate dean is required for all students desiring a double major or double concentration. Tuition scholarships granted by the Boyer College do not cover the private lesson fees.

Boyer College Policies for Dance Students

Students are responsible for complying with all university-wide academic policies that apply to their individual academic status. Additional and unique policies, or exceptions for the Boyer College of Music, Department of Dance, appear below.

Dean's List

Each fall and spring semester, those undergraduates who have met the credit hour and academic criteria for their school or college are placed on the Dean's List. See the Dean's List policy for specific GPA and credit-hour requirements.

Leave of Absence

Students must submit the Leave of Absence form to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator in advance of the semester in which the leave is to take place, stating the reason(s) why the leave is necessary. A Leave of Absence must be authorized by the Undergraduate Program Coordinator and Department Chairperson, who will process the leave in accordance with the university's leave of absence policy. (Policy # 02.10.16)

Injury Policy

An injury may affect a student’s ability to successfully continue in a course. A student who is injured is expected to immediately contact their instructor and the Undergraduate Program Coordinator to discuss the possibility of continuance in the course. Injured students are responsible for seeking appropriate medical attention for their injuries. Students must provide an official doctor’s note recommending non-participation in class to their instructors. Failure to provide a doctor’s note verifying an injury may result in the student’s violation of applicable absence policies or may otherwise impact the student’s grade. 

Any student who is advised by a doctor to refrain from dancing for three weeks or more may be required to withdraw from studio courses that focus on dance technique, composition, repertory and improvisation. For students who will miss fewer than three weeks of classes due to their injury, and who are physically able to do so, must attend all classes to observe and take notes. Instructors may assign additional written work if appropriate. If a student is unable to participate in midterm or final examinations due to an injury, the student is responsible for working with their instructor to develop alternate assignments at the discretion of the faculty member.

Persons subject to this policy may have the option for a medical withdrawal or an incomplete in their courses.  Students should review Temple University's Withdrawal from Classes Policy (02.10.14) and Incomplete Coursework Policy (02.10.13).

Independent Study and Field Experience

Students who wish to register for Independent Study or Field Experience must submit a written proposal to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator no later than two months in advance of the semester in which the study is to be accomplished. A student who is on academic probation may not register for Independent Study or Field Experience. Credits will not be granted retroactively, and no more than 4 credits will be awarded over the course of a student's undergraduate study.

Full-Time/Part-Time Status

The semester load for full-time undergraduate students is 17 credits. Undergraduate students must carry at least 12 credit hours to be classified as full-time. The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance requires matriculated students to attend on a full-time basis each semester. Students who have been full-time for at least four semesters may petition the Undergraduate Program Coordinator no later than two months in advance for approval to enroll in the subsequent semester on a part-time basis. All requests for part-time status must be approved by the dance faculty. Part-time status is granted for one semester only. Students who are on academic probation are not eligible for part-time status. If a student is granted part-time status and is then placed on academic probation, part-time status will be revoked.

Academic Overloads (18 or more semester hours)

Academic overloads need special approval from the Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Students interested in pursuing an academic overload should contact their Faculty Advisor no later than 2 months prior to the start of the semester in which they desire to overload. Students who are on academic probation are not eligible for academic overloads.

Technique Standards

Temple University's Department of Dance recognizes the necessity of technical training in building professional quality performers, choreographers, and teachers. Our technique classes include a diverse range of dance forms, including ballet, modern, jazz, and African. Each of our technique teachers draws from an array of influences and styles, preparing students for the eclecticism found within the contemporary dance world today. Through four years of technical training, our students gain an understanding of and apply the following principles in reaching their expressive potential and minimizing injury:

  •  Alignment and Core Connection
  •  Physical Strength and Flexibility
  •  Upper and Lower Body Integration
  •  Clarity in Articulating Various Body Parts
  •  Sensitivity to Qualitative Range and Expressivity Inside Movement
  •  Rhythmic Awareness and Musicality
  •  Incorporation of Weight and Breath
  •  Spatial Awareness
  •  Critical Thinking
  •  Self Motivation and Discipline

Modern Technique represents the core of our students' technical training. Students in the Performance & Choreography Focus are required to advance to Modern Technique IV, while students in the Dance Education Focus are required to advance to at least Modern Technique III. In all technique classes, video evaluations occur at the mid-term and final periods of each semester. Following these evaluations, students receive verbal and written feedback from their instructors. This process provides a method of looking at a student's progress in developing the target competencies for each level of technique.

Technique Placement Class

All entering undergraduates are placed into modern and ballet technique levels based on their audition and supplemental dance application. Adjustments to level placement may be made during the first week of classes. Returning undergraduates should consult with their faculty advisor about level placement prior to registering for classes. Students may repeat a level up to two times, and are not allowed to regress in level.

First Semester Program Review

At the end of the first semester, each student's progress will be formally evaluated in the following categories to determine suitability for continued study within the dance program.

Academic Progress

Students must successfully complete the following dance courses:

DANC 1801First Year Seminar in Dance1
DANC 1811Movement Improvisation I2
DANC 1813Dance Repertory I2
or DANC 1819 Dance Production
DANC 1841Music for Dancers2
or DANC 1851 Global Dance Traditions
At least two modern technique classes
At least one ballet technique class

Technical Growth

Students must be able to demonstrate and articulate verbally a conceptual understanding of alignment, strength, and mobility. They must be able to assimilate sequential movement materials, and successfully perform basic movement phrases.

Improvisation

Students must demonstrate their ability to spontaneously create solo movement, and demonstrate their understanding of basic partnering techniques and improvising in groups. Students will be able to generate movement material that both explores and expands their expressive range as dancers.

Creative Engagement

Over the course of the first semester, students must:

  • Participate in one performance or audition one finished work for the student concert.
  • Demonstrate consistent attendance, focus, intellectual curiosity, and openness to new approaches, as reflected in faculty evaluations of student coursework.
  • Demonstrate receptivity to feedback and in-class evaluation from instructors, and apply this information in subsequent work.
  • Demonstrate healthy life practices as part of a disciplined approach towards one's work as a dancer.
  • Maintain positive professional interactions with peers and faculty.

Second Semester Program Review

At the end of the second semester, each student's progress will be formally evaluated in the following categories to determine suitability for continued study within the dance program.

Academic Progress

Students must successfully complete the following dance courses:

DANC 1801First Year Seminar in Dance1
DANC 1811Movement Improvisation I2
DANC 1813Dance Repertory I2
DANC 1819Dance Production1
DANC 1841Music for Dancers2
DANC 1851Global Dance Traditions2
At least four modern technique classes
At least two ballet technique classes

Technical Growth

Students must be able to apply, demonstrate, and articulate verbally a conceptual understanding of alignment, strength, and mobility. They must be able to assimilate sequential movement materials, and successfully perform movement phrases that deal with the following elements:

  • Movement efficiency and proper alignment
  • Shifting off the vertical line of balance and returning to center
  • Basic rhythmic structures and patterns
  • Basic locomotor movement and some inverted movement
  • Variable spatial planes, directions, and levels
  • Assimilation of sequential movement material
  • Concepts of body organization: such as breath support, core to distal/head to tail patterning, upper-lower/body half integration, and cross-lateral patterning 
  • Differing energy qualities:  how energy is directed within the body and projected out into space

Creative Engagement

Over the course of the second semester, students must:

  • Participate in one performance or audition one finished work for the student concert.
  • Demonstrate consistent attendance, focus, intellectual curiosity, and openness to new approaches, as reflected in faculty evaluations of student coursework.
  • Demonstrate receptivity to feedback and in-class evaluation from instructors, and apply this information in subsequent work.
  • Demonstrate healthy life practices as part of a disciplined approach towards one's work as a dancer.
  • Maintain positive professional interactions with peers and faculty.

Third Semester Program Review

At the end of the third semester, each student's progress will be formally evaluated in the following categories to determine suitability for continued study within the dance program. As part of this process, students apply for entrance into either the Dance Education Focus or the Performance & Choreography Focus. 

Artistic Portfolio

By December 1st, students will submit to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator a portfolio containing the following:

  • Concert Programs: copies for each production in which the student has participated as a performer or stage crew.
  • DVD: videos of all choreography and performances in previous three semesters.
  • Essay: a personal statement of 1-2 pages that identifies the track the student wishes to pursue, how that track will impact their professional goals and development, and assesses their artistic and professional development within the curriculum to date.

Academic Progress

Students must successfully complete the following dance courses, in addition to those listed for the first and second semester reviews:

DANC 2813Dance Composition I2
DANC 2814Dance Composition II2
DANC 2872Foundations of Dance Education3
or DANC 3851 Lighting Design for Dance
DANC 4874Dance Repertory III3
or DANC 4811 African Dance Repertory
At least six modern technique classes
At least three ballet technique classes

Technical Growth

Students must demonstrate awareness of alignment issues and articulate personal strategies for addressing them. They must be able to assimilate and retain movement material sequentially and qualitatively, and successfully perform movement phrases that deal with the following elements:

  •  Increased movement efficiency and proper alignment
  •  Basic kinesiological principles in technique and conditioning contexts
  •  Increased facility in shifting off the vertical line of balance and returning to center
  •  Incorporation of weight into on-balance and off-balance movement involving momentum and weight release
  •  Increased rhythmic acuity: ability to work with shifting accents, structures & patterns
  •  Embodiment of musicality and more complex phrasing
  •  Movement initiation and follow-through
  •  Ability to risk and expand one's spatial parameters: demonstration of an increased drive through space
  •  Modulation between different energy states with breath support inside metric and non-metric phrasing
  •  Developing confidence in one's creative engagement with movement material
  •  Ability to adapt when experiencing new teaching methods and styles

Choreography

Students must also be able to discuss their work and the process by which they created it.  Students must be able to create and perform a dance that:

  •  Successfully communicates an idea of personal significance;
  •  Demonstrates the ability to develop thematic movement material;
  •  Investigates movement imaginatively;
  •  Explores a range of dynamic qualities; and,
  •  Reflects a basic understanding of choreographic structure.

Creative Engagement

By the end of the third semester, students must:

  • Audition one piece of their choreography for a student concert and participate in three performances.
  • Demonstrate consistent attendance, focus, intellectual curiosity, and openness to new approaches as reflected in faculty evaluations of student coursework.
  • Demonstrate receptivity to feedback and in-class evaluations from instructors, and apply this information in subsequent work.
  • Maintain positive, professional interactions with peers and faculty.
  • Demonstrate healthy life practices as part of a disciplined approach towards one's work as a dancer.
  • Participate in one audition or recruitment event.

Special Course Sequences

The courses listed below must be taken in the specified sequence, and cannot be taken out of order or during the same semester. All courses must be completed before students register for Senior Choreographic Project or Dance Education Project.

  •  Composition: Movement Improvisation I, Composition I, Composition II, Creative Process
  •  History: Dance Modernism, Dance Post-Modernism
  •  Repertory: Dance Repertory I, Dance Repertory II, Dance Repertory III1
  •  Technical Theater: Dance Production, Lighting Design for Dance
1

Enrollment in Dance Repertory III is by audition, and only required in the Performance & Choreography Focus. 

Note that the general college graduation requirements for music students and dance students are listed in separate sections below.

University Requirements

  • All new students are required to complete the university's General Education (GenEd) curriculum.
  • All Temple students must take a minimum of two writing-intensive courses as part of the major. 

General College Graduation Requirements - Music

  • All music education students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to obtain permission to student teach and qualify for state teacher certification.
  • All music therapy students must receive a grade of C or better in all music therapy classes. Grades below C in any music therapy course may not be applied toward degree requirements in music therapy. All students are permitted to repeat a course one time. Students who need to repeat a course a second time must obtain the approval of the dean/designee of their home school or college and be registered with assistance. Except as permitted by this policy, no students may repeat a course a third time. Students who have exhausted course attempts for course(s) required for their major will be required to change majors.
  • All Boyer College music students must attend a minimum number of College recitals each semester to qualify for graduation. Refer to the Recital and Concert Attendance Policy for more detailed information.
  • All Boyer College music students are required to participate in specific ensembles as determined by their department and program. Refer to the Ensemble Requirement Policy for more detailed information.
  • Students in the following curriculums are required to perform a senior recital prior to graduation: Piano Performance, Piano Pedagogy, Instrumental Performance, Voice Performance, Jazz Instrumental Performance, Jazz Voice Performance, and Jazz Arranging/Composition. Refer to the Senior Recital Policy for more detailed information.
  • All undergraduate music students must be cleared by the Assistant Director of Advising for graduation by the end of their junior year.

Please refer to the Boyer College Policy Section for a complete list of policies. Detailed requirements for each degree program are listed within the curriculum section of the Bulletin.

Descriptions

  1. Certain courses fulfill multiple requirements. In consultation with an advisor, students will be able to plan their curriculum more effectively.
  2. The total number of credit hours required for graduation may be greater for some students based on placement exams, transfer evaluations, individual curricular choices, and academic progress.
  3. Students must fulfill the necessary prerequisites for any given course or course sequence. See the Prerequisite and Co-requisite Policy in the University-wide Academic Policies section of this Bulletin.

General College Graduation Requirements - Dance

See the Dance Major page for the specific courses that are required for dance majors.  

  1. Dance required GPA for graduation: 2.0 cumulative, 2.0 in dance major courses.
  2. Dance Contact Information:
    1700 N. Broad Street, Suite 309
    Main Office Phone: 215-204-8710
  3. Dance Requirements & Special Course Sequences (see dance major page for details):
    1. Must be taken in the required sequence
    2. Cannot be taken out of order or during the same semester
    3. All must be completed before students register for Senior Choreographic Projects.

Academic Advising Center

All Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science in Music, Bachelor of Science in Music Technology, and Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance students will be assigned a faculty advisor. Students are required to meet with their advisor prior to registering for classes for the following semester.

Academic advisors attempt to avoid errors when advising students about their program requirements. Temple University's Schools and Colleges cannot assume liability for errors in advising; therefore, students must assume primary responsibility for understanding the requirements for their degree, and acquiring current information about their academic status.

Boyer College of Music and Dance - ADVISING CONTACTS

Marguerite Jackson, Assistant Director of Advising
200 Mitten Hall West Balcony
215-204-2229
margo@temple.edu

Lesley Copans, Academic Advisor
200 Mitten Hall West Balcony
215-204-8372
lcopans@temple.edu

Dr. Edward Flanagan, Associate Dean for Student Affairs
Presser Hall
215-204-8301
edward.flanagan@temple.edu

Dr. Beth Bolton, Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs
Rock Hall
215-204-5527
bbolton@temple.edu

Departmental Faculty Advisors

DANCE

Dr. Karen Bond
Associate Professor of Dance
215-204-6280
kbond003@temple.edu

Dr. Sherril Dodds
Professor of Dance
Chair, Dance Department
215-204-4959
sherril.dodds@temple.edu

Jillian Harris
Assistant Professor of Dance
215-204-5114
jhdan2@temple.edu

Laura Katz Rizzo
Assistant Professor of Dance
215-204-2328
laura.katz@temple.edu

Kun-Yang Lin
Associate Professor of Dance
215-204-5168
kun-yang.lin@temple.edu

Merian Soto
Associate Professor of Dance
215-204-6281
msoto@temple.edu

Dr. Kariamu Welsh
Professor of Dance
215-204-6286
kariamu@temple.edu

Dr. Laura Katz Rizzo
Dance Undergraduate Program Coordinator
laura.katz@temple.edu

Instrumental

Dr. Matthew Brunner
Director of Athletic Bands
215-204-2162
brunnerm@temple.edu

Vladimir Dyo
Instrumental Music
215-204-8334
vladimirdyo@temple.edu

Phillip O'Banion
Assistant Professor, Artist Director for Percussion
215-204-8329
obanion@temple.edu

Emily Threinen
Associate Professor, Artistic Director for Winds and Brass
Director of Bands
215-204-8335
emily.threinen@temple.edu

Jazz Studies

Terell Stafford
Professor, Director of Jazz Studies
215-204-8036
tstaffor@temple.edu

Music Education and Music Therapy

Dr. Rollo Dilworth, Chair
Associate Professor of Music Education
215-204-8310
rollo.dilworth@temple.edu

Dr. Deborah Sheldon
Professor of Music Education
215-204-8649
dsheldon@temple.edu

Dr. Beth Bolton
Associate Dean
215-204-8474
bbolton@temple.edu

Dr. Alison Reynolds              
Associate Professor of Music Education                      
alison.reynolds@temple.edu

Dr. Nathan Buonviri             
Assistant Professor of Music Education                      
buonviri@temple.edu

Dr. Darlene Brooks
Associate Professor of Music Therapy
darlene.brooks@temple.edu

Music Studies
Bachelor of Science in Music

Marguerite Jackson                                                       
Assistant Director of Advising
215-204-2229                                      
margo@temple.edu

Music Studies

Cynthia Folio
Music Studies Department Chair
215-204-8315
cfolio@temple.edu

Composition

Dr. Maurice Wright
Composition Coordinator
215-204-8016
wright@temple.edu

Music History

Dr. Steven Zohn
Music History Coordinator
215-204-5096
szohn@temple.edu

Music Theory

Dr. Edward Latham
Music Theory Coordinator
215-204-8498
elatham@temple.edu

Keyboard

Charles Abramovic, Chair
Professor of Piano
215-204-7388
charles.abramovic@temple.edu

Vocal Arts

Dr. Christine Anderson, Chair
Associate Professor of Voice
215-204-8375
cla@temple.edu

Change of Concentration within Music

Students wishing to change their concentration or major may need to contact Margo Jackson, Assistant Director of Advising, 200 Mitten Hall West Balcony, 215-204-2229. An interview with the Department Chairperson, along with written authorization from your Department and Faculty advisor, is required.

Change of Program Request form:

www.temple.edu/vpus/forms/index.htm#advising

If you are considering changing your major from music to another major within Temple University, please see Margo Jackson in Presser Hall. Many colleges require students to schedule Intra-University Transfer workshops.

Permission to Take a Course Outside of Temple University: See Academic Policies

University Academic Resources: www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/index.htm

New Student Orientation Information: http://orientation.temple.edu

Registration and Schedule Revision — Add/Drop: See Registration.

Faculty

Charles Abramovic, Professor, Department of Keyboard Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Temple University.

Mitos Andaya, Associate Professor, Department of Vocal Arts, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., University of Kansas.

Christine L. Anderson, Associate Professor, Department of Vocal Arts, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.

Christine Bass, Assistant Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., Westminster Choir College Rider University.

Luis O. Biava, Professor Emeritus, Department of Instrumental Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., Manhattan School of Music.

Beth Bolton, Associate Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Temple University.

Karen E. Bond, Associate Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., La Trobe University.

Darlene M. Brooks, Associate Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Temple University.

Matthew Brunner, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Instrumental Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Indiana University.

Sara Buechner, Associate Professor, Department of Keyboard Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Manhattan School of Music.

Nathan Buonviri, Assistant Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Temple University.

David B. Cannata, Associate Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., New York University.

Deborah A. Confredo, Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Florida State University.

Andreas Delfs, Professor, Department of Instrumental Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., The Juilliard School.

Marcus DeLoach, Assistant Professor, Department of Vocal Arts, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Rice University.

Alexander deVaron, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Temple University.

Cheryl L. Dileo, Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Louisiana State University.

Rollo A. Dilworth, Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Northwestern University.

Sherril Dodds, Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., University of Surrey.

Vladimir Dyo, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Instrumental Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Temple University.

Alexander E. Fiorillo, Professor Emeritus, Department of Keyboard Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., Catholic University of America.

Edward Flanagan, Associate Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Temple University.

Cynthia J. Folio, Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Eastman School of Music.

Mark Franko, Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher, Assistant Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., University of Virginia.

Lorie A. Gratis, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Vocal Arts, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Temple University.

Matthew J. Greenbaum, Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., City University of New York.

Jillian Harris, Associate Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.F.A., New York University Tisch School of the Arts.

Lawrence R. Indik, Associate Professor (Practice), Department of Vocal Arts, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Manhattan School of Music.

John F. Johnson, Professor Emeritus, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., University of Texas.

Laura E. Katz Rizzo, Assistant Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Temple University.

Gregory S. Kettinger, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; B.M., Temple University.

Joann M. Kirchner, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Keyboard Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Michael Klein, Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

Steven Kreinberg, Associate Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ed.D., Temple University.

Jan L. Krzywicki, Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., Philadelphia Musical Academy.

Edward D. Latham, Associate Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Yale University.

Kun-Yang Lin, Associate Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.F.A., New York University Tisch School of the Arts.

Joyce Z. Lindorff, Professor, Department of Keyboard Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., The Juilliard School.

Wendy Magee, Associate Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., University of Sheffield.

Noriko Manabe, Associate Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Graduate Center, City University of New York.

Sally Ann Ness, Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., University of Washington.

Phillip R. O'Banion, Assistant Professor, Department of Instrumental Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., University of Colorado.

Richard D. Oatts, Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance.

Lambert T. Orkis, Professor, Department of Keyboard Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., Temple University.

Elizabeth C. Parker, Assistant Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

David Pasbrig, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Temple University.

Paul Rardin, Associate Professor, Department of Vocal Arts, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., University of Michigan.

Alison M. Reynolds, Associate Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Temple University.

Valery Ryvkin, Associate Professor, Department of Vocal Arts, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., The Juilliard School.

Benjamin A. Schachter, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., New England Conservatory.

Eduard Schmieder, Professor, Department of Instrumental Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance.

Helen Shoemark, Associate Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., University of Melbourne.

Jeffrey C. Solow, Professor, Department of Instrumental Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; B.A., University of California Los Angeles.

Merián Soto, Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.A.

Terell L. Stafford, Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., Rutgers University.

Robert T. Stroker, Professor, Department of Music Education and Music Therapy, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Maria del Pico Taylor, Professor, Department of Keyboard Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; M.M., Northwestern University.

Lindsay Weightman, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Manhattan School of Music.

Kariamu Welsh, Professor, Department of Dance, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.A., New York University.

Stephen A. Willier, Associate Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., University of Illinois.

Maurice W. Wright, Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; D.M.A., Columbia University.

Steven D. Zohn, Professor, Department of Music Studies, Boyer College of Music and Dance; Ph.D., Cornell University.