Industrial and Systems Engineering

Learn more about the Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering.

Thomas V. Edwards, DPS, Chair of Engineering, Technology, & Management
Engineering Building, Room 907
215-204-7794
tve@temple.edu

Julie Drzymalski, Ph.D., Program Director
Engineering Building, Room 907
215-204-2970
julie.drzymalski@temple.edu

The Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering program prepares students to become leaders in quality and productivity management. This 128-credit undergraduate program is a blend of engineering and business, preparing students to design, develop, implement and improve the integrated systems that help a wide variety of companies save money and increase operating efficiency.

Industrial and systems engineering applies to more than manufacturing—the work of industrial and systems engineers encompasses nearly every industry and sector. The versatile, interdisciplinary curriculum positions students to graduate with the tools and skills that meet a growing demand for industrial and systems engineers. Compared to other engineering disciplines, Industrial and System Engineering students take courses in business and across engineering fields of study, making learning versatile for many types of applications for companies as they continuously seek to increase productivity and efficiency and improve quality. Students will gain the knowledge base to provide these companies with innovative and creative solutions.

Goals & Objectives

The curriculum will prepare graduates to design, develop, implement, and improve integrated systems that include people, materials, information, and equipment. The curriculum includes in-depth instruction to accomplish the integration of systems using appropriate analytical, computational, and experimental practices.

Summary of Requirements

University Requirements

All new students are required to complete the university's General Education (GenEd) curriculum.

All Temple students must take a minimum of two writing-intensive courses for a total of at least six credits. The writing-intensive course credits are counted as part of the major; they are not General Education (GenEd) or elective credits. The writing-intensive courses must be completed at Temple University and students may not transfer in credits to satisfy this requirement. The specific writing-intensive courses required for this major are: 

ENGR 2196Technical Communication3
or ENGR 2996 Honors Technical Communication by Design
ENGR 4296Senior Design Project II3
or ENGR 4996 Honors Senior Design Project II

Department Requirements

Required Math & Basic Science Courses
MATH 1041Calculus I4
or MATH 1941 Honors Calculus I
MATH 1042Calculus II4
or MATH 1942 Honors Calculus II
MATH 2043Calculus III4
or MATH 2943 Honors Calculus III
MATH 3041Differential Equations I3
or MATH 3941 Honors Differential Equations I
CEE 3048Probability, Statistics & Stochastic Methods3
Select one of the following:3
Engineering Analysis & Applications
Linear Algebra
PHYS 1061Elementary Classical Physics I4
or PHYS 1961 Honors Elementary Classical Physics I
PHYS 1062Elementary Classical Physics II4
or PHYS 1962 Honors Elementary Classical Physics II
CHEM 1035Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 1033General Chemistry Laboratory I1
or CHEM 1953 Honors Chemical Science Laboratory I
Required General Education Courses
Select one of the following:4
Analytical Reading and Writing
Analytical Reading and Writing: ESL
Honors Literature/Reading/Writing
IH 0851Intellectual Heritage I: The Good Life3
or IH 0951 Honors Intellectual Heritage I: The Good Life
IH 0852Intellectual Heritage II: The Common Good3
or IH 0952 Honors Intellectual Heritage II: The Common Good
GenEd 08xx or 09xx (Human Behavior)3
GenEd 08xx or 09xx (Race and Diversity)3
GenEd 08xx or 09xx (Global/World Society)3
GenEd 08xx or 09xx (U.S. Society)3
GenEd 08xx or 09xx (Arts)3
Required Industrial and Systems Engineering Courses
ISE 2101Applied Statistical Methods for Industrial and System Engineers3
ISE 2102Production Process Design and Laboratory4
ISE 2103Deterministic Models in Operations Research3
ISE 3101Product Quality Assurance3
ISE 3102Stochastic Models in Operations Research3
ISE 3103Systems Thinking and Modeling3
ISE 4102Industrial Simulation3
ISE 4104Production Planning and Control3
ISE 4105Facility Planning3
ISE 4107Systems Engineering Fundamentals3
Required Engineering Courses
ENGR 1101Introduction to Engineering & Engineering Technology3
or ENGR 1901 Honors Introduction to Engineering
ENGR 1102Introduction to Engineering Problem Solving3
ENGR 1117Engineering Graphics2
ENGR 2196Technical Communication3
or ENGR 2996 Honors Technical Communication by Design
ENGR 3001Engineering Economics3
ENGR 4169Engineering Seminar1
ENGR 4171Senior Design Project I for Industrial and Systems Engineering2
ENGR 4296Senior Design Project II3
or ENGR 4996 Honors Senior Design Project II
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming in Python
Computer Programming in C
Engineering Computation I
Industrial & Systems Technical Electives 6
Select two of the following:
Environmental Engineering
Transportation Systems Management
Intelligent Transportation Systems
Engineering Computation II
Co-Op Work Experience I
Co-Op Work Experience II
Entrepreneurial Engineering
Human Factors (Ergonomics)
Engineering Cost Analysis
Service Systems Engineering
Required Business Courses
ACCT 2501Survey of Accounting3
MSOM 3101Operations Management3
SCM 3515Principles of Supply Chain Management3
Total Credit Hours128

Suggested Academic Plan

Please note that this is a suggested academic plan. Depending on your situation, your academic plan may look different.

Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering

Requirements for New Students starting in the 2020-2021 Academic Year

Year 1
FallCredit Hours
ENGR 1101 or 1901Introduction to Engineering & Engineering Technology3
ENGR 1117Engineering Graphics2
MATH 1041 or 1941Calculus I4
PHYS 1061 or 1961Elementary Classical Physics I4
ENG 0802, 0812, or 0902Analytical Reading and Writing [GW]4
 Term Credit Hours17
Spring
PHYS 1062 or 1962Elementary Classical Physics II4
CHEM 1035Chemistry for Engineers3
CHEM 1033 or 1953General Chemistry Laboratory I1
MATH 1042 or 1942Calculus II4
ENGR 1102Introduction to Engineering Problem Solving3
 Term Credit Hours15
Year 2
Fall
MATH 2043 or 2943Calculus III4
IH 0851 or 0951Intellectual Heritage I: The Good Life [GY]3
ACCT 2501Survey of Accounting3
ISE 2101Applied Statistical Methods for Industrial and System Engineers3
ISE 2102Production Process Design and Laboratory4
 Term Credit Hours17
Spring
MATH 3041 or 3941Differential Equations I3
IH 0852 or 0952Intellectual Heritage II: The Common Good [GZ]3
MSOM 3101Operations Management3
ISE 2103Deterministic Models in Operations Research3
Select one of the following:3
Engineering Analysis & Applications 
Linear Algebra 
 Term Credit Hours15
Year 3
Fall
CEE 3048Probability, Statistics & Stochastic Methods3
ENGR 2196 or 2996Technical Communication [WI]3
ENGR 3001Engineering Economics3
SCM 3515Principles of Supply Chain Management3
ISE 3103Systems Thinking and Modeling3
GenEd Breadth Course3
 Term Credit Hours18
Spring
ENGR 4169Engineering Seminar1
ISE 3101Product Quality Assurance3
ISE 3102Stochastic Models in Operations Research3
ISE 4104Production Planning and Control3
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming in Python 
Computer Programming in C 
Engineering Computation I 
 Term Credit Hours14
Year 4
Fall
ENGR 4171Senior Design Project I for Industrial and Systems Engineering2
ISE 4102Industrial Simulation3
ISE 4105Facility Planning3
Industrial & Systems Technical Elective #13
GenEd Breadth Course3
GenEd Breadth Course3
 Term Credit Hours17
Spring
ENGR 4296 or 4996Senior Design Project II [WI]3
ISE 4107Systems Engineering Fundamentals3
Industrial & Systems Technical Elective #23
GenEd Breadth Course3
GenEd Breadth Course3
 Term Credit Hours15
 Total Credit Hours: 128
Approved Industrial & Systems Technical Electives
CEE 3711Environmental Engineering3
CEE 4201Transportation Systems Management3
CEE 4221Intelligent Transportation Systems3
ECE 3822Engineering Computation II3
ENGR 2181Co-Op Work Experience I3
ENGR 3181Co-Op Work Experience II3
ENGR 3033Entrepreneurial Engineering3
ISE 4101Human Factors (Ergonomics)3
ISE 4103Engineering Cost Analysis3
ISE 4106Service Systems Engineering3

Courses

ISE 2101. Applied Statistical Methods for Industrial and System Engineers. 3 Credit Hours.

Statistical analysis techniques and their applications in the field of industrial and systems engineering are presented. Topics include the statistical measures describing data, frequency distributions, probability distributions, sampling parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, regression analyses, and analyses of variance. Special emphasis on their application to field of industrial and systems engineering.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR MA07 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATW Y|May not be taken concurrently.

ISE 2102. Production Process Design and Laboratory. 4 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the theory and practice of manufacturing processes. Study covers the fabrication of metallic, plastic, and electrical products, operation of NC and other automatic equipment, and economics of the design and production process. Topics to be covered include introduction to manufacturing processes, metal forming processes, metal cutting processes and machine tools, metal finishing processes, introduction to AutoCAD, numerical control (NC) machining, processing of plastic products and an introduction to automated manufacturing processes. Lectures will be complemented by a laboratory.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ENGR 1117|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ISE 2103. Deterministic Models in Operations Research. 3 Credit Hours.

The deterministic techniques of operations research. Topics include the applications of linear, nonlinear, integer, and dynamic programming methods and network flows analysis to solve industrial and systems engineering problems. Other topics include an introduction and overview of deterministic models, preliminaries of Linear Programming (LP), graphical solution of linear programming and introduction to simplex method, sensitivity analysis, marginal utility, computer applications and LP packages, transportation and assignment problems, network and graph theory introduction, spanning trees shortest route algorithm, Dijkstra's algorithm, formulation of shortest path as LP, maximum flow algorithms, nonlinear programming, classical optimization, integer programming introduction, Gomory's cutting plane, branch and bound method, complete methods, Dynamic Programming (DP), and recursive relationship of DP.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
MATH 2043|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ISE 3101. Product Quality Assurance. 3 Credit Hours.

Methods used to achieve higher product quality, to prevent defects, to locate chronic sources of trouble, to measure process capability, and to use inspection data to regulate manufacturing processes are emphasized. Preparation of statistical control charts and selection of suitable sampling plans. Topics include review of probability distributions, control chart principles, control charts for variables (X, R charts), control charts for attributes (p, c, u charts), specifications and tolerances, fundamentals of acceptance sampling, acceptance sampling by attributes, special attribute sampling procedures, reliability, graphic methods for quality control, and TQM and ISO standards.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ISE 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ISE 3102. Stochastic Models in Operations Research. 3 Credit Hours.

Probabilistic techniques of operations research. Topics include the applications of Markov chains, queueing and inventory control models to analyze and evaluate systems performance. Other topics include introduction to stochastic processes, review of probability, Markov chains and classification of their states, long-run Markov chains and applications, introduction to queueing theory, birth and death process, applications of queueing theory, introduction to inventory theory, components of inventory models, deterministic inventory models, stochastic inventory models, and introduction to forecasting.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ISE 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ISE 3103. Systems Thinking and Modeling. 3 Credit Hours.

Utilizing a systems thinking approach in engineering design and development is necessary to understand the connections and dependencies that exist within the system. This course introduces the concept of systems thinking and computer modeling via system dynamics. Computer modeling can aid in understanding the complex feedback dynamics possible emergent behavior which can be found in the human, technological and organization systems. In addition, policy interventions and their effect on the behavior and structure of the system will also be addressed.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ISE 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (MATH 3041|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 3941|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ISE 4101. Human Factors (Ergonomics). 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers Human-machine systems analysis. The study of workplace layout, measurement of employee efficiency and productivity, criteria for tool and fixture design or selection, industrial fatigue, environmental influences on performance including the effects of illumination, noise, vibration, thermal, and other atmospheric factors. The basic ideas of industrial hygiene; the impact of OSHA; and special techniques for experimenting with human subjects, via demonstrations and supervised experiments are explored. Additional topics include human factor definitions, human factor research methodologies, human information processing, visual presentation - static and dynamic information, auditory and other displays; speech communication, motor skills, human control systems, data entry devices, physical work and manual materials handling, applied anthropometry, workplace environment; illumination and atmospheric conditions, noise, vibration and motion, human error, accidents and warnings, and usability and human-computer interaction.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ISE 4102. Industrial Simulation. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the application of simulation modeling for the analysis of complex industrial and manufacturing service systems. Examples are chosen from real-life situations such as warehousing, material handling, robotics, transportation, and hospital emergency rooms. Verification/validation as well as statistical analysis of both input/output data are introduced. Topics include Verification and validation, calibration of models, face validity, validity of assumptions, Turing/Delphi test, comparison and evaluation of alternative systems, simulation examples, queueing systems, inventory systems, object oriented programming, ARENA simulation software, random number generation, Input modeling and Output analysis, confidence intervals, and variance reduction.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ISE 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ISE 4103. Engineering Cost Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the tools and techniques applicable for cost analysis and control including standard costs, variance analysis, cost volume relationships, cost estimation, and utilization of accounting data for control of operations. Topics include basics of financial/cost management; elements of financial accounting and development of income statements and balance sheets; cash flow statements, inventory valuation methods; cost-volume relationships, cost drivers; methods of measurement, application of regression analysis; product addition or deletion, target costing, pricing decision; cost allocation; activity based costing, job order cost systems and process cost systems and overhead, cost allocation, analysis and control.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ACCT 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ISE 4104. Production Planning and Control. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the study of the components and functioning of integrated production, planning, and control systems; forecasting, aggregate planning, scheduling, and recent models of production and inventory control for optimizing continuous and intermittent manufacturing operations. MRP basics and introduction to using a computer to apply scheduling models will be covered. Topics include functional modules in the control of a manufacturing organization, forecasting methods, aggregate planning and master scheduling, linear programming based methods, capacity requirements planning; machine scheduling, job sequencing and line balancing; job shop and flow shop models; material requirements planning and just-in-time production control.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
ISE 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently.

ISE 4105. Facility Planning. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will study strategic planning of production facilities including location, planning, design and maintenance. Emphasis on production systems, machine selection, automation, material handling, storage and warehousing, quality, retrofitting and preventative maintenance.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ISE 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ISE 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ISE 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ISE 4106. Service Systems Engineering. 3 Credit Hours.

Services play a vital role in modern economies. In many economies they surpass their manufacturing counterparts in terms of contribution to the Gross Domestic Product, yet they cannot be handled in the exact same manner. The fundamentals of this sector as an engineering field will be discussed as well as the operations of service systems as a customer-centric environment. Topics will include service quality, strategies, operations, electronic services, queueing, service supply chains and managing service projects. Various projects will be handled during the course of the semester focusing on various aspects of the service industry.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ISE 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ISE 4104|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

ISE 4107. Systems Engineering Fundamentals. 3 Credit Hours.

Complex system development requires both hard and soft skills to address the challenges in modern engineering. Systems engineering includes human, organization and technical variables that all must be considered in complex system development. This course will cover the foundations of systems science and systems thinking, as well as an overview of the methodology that systems engineers use to bring these systems to fruition. Topics in the methodology that will be covered include identification of needs, requirements development, design and design integration, verification and validation as well as tools used to perform these functions such as technical management, life cycle costing and risk analysis and management. This course will show the breadth of knowledge that is required of a systems engineer to address engineering challenges.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(ISE 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ISE 3103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)