College of Public Health

Laura A. Siminoff, Ph.D., Dean
College of Public Health, Temple University
Bell Building (TECH Center), 3rd Floor
1101 W. Montgomery Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19122
215-204-5200
https://cph.temple.edu

Since its inception in 1966, the college has prepared well-rounded practitioners who are sensitive to patient/client needs and whose professional competence is built on a solid foundation of theory, laboratory practice, and clinical fieldwork/internships. The college offers undergraduate programs that include Exercise and Sport Science, Health Information Management, Health Professions, Kinesiology, Nursing, Public Health, Social Work, Speech, Language and Hearing Science, and Recreational Therapy. Students graduating with a B.S. degree in Health Information Management, Kinesiology, Nursing, Public Health, or Recreational Therapy meet the entry-level requirements of their professions and are qualified to take state and/or national examinations leading to certification or licensure in their fields. 

Vision Statement

The College of Public Health aspires to be a global leader in the discovery, dissemination, and integration of health and social welfare related research, practice, and teaching. Our diverse population of students and highly recognized faculty seek to enhance the quality of life for all.

Mission Statement

The College of Public Health prepares future generations of professionals through discovery, ethical practice, and lifelong learning. 

Admissions

Those seeking undergraduate admission to the programs in the College of Public Health must apply through Temple's Undergraduate Admissions office at admissions.temple.edu. Prospective students who wish to obtain additional information about our programs are encouraged to visit the college's web site at https://cph.temple.edu or send an e-mail to cph@temple.edu.

Please note that many undergraduate programs in the College of Public Health require students to complete clinical/field education experiences at facilities both on and off the University campus. Many of these placements may require that you have personal health insurance. Additionally, many will require a criminal background check, Act 33/34 clearances and perhaps a drug screen. Failure to maintain personal health insurance or the results of your background clearances may limit and potentially eliminate placement options which can, in turn, result in an inability to meet graduation requirements. The College cannot ensure clinical field placements if you fail to meet the requirements or maintain health insurance. Additionally, conviction of a misdemeanor, felony, or felonious or illegal act may prevent you from becoming credentialed and/or licensed to practice in certain professions. Please review the requirements for the particular program in which you are interested as well as licensure or credentialing rules in the state(s) you are interested in working to review your eligibility.

Admission to Exercise & Sport Science, Kinesiology, Public Health, Social Work, Speech, Language & Hearing Science, and Recreational Therapy

Entering undergraduates, whether freshmen or transfers from other institutions, are admitted to these programs by submitting an application to Temple's Undergraduate Admissions office. Decisions are based on a review of the applicant's academic credentials. Current Temple students may also enter these programs by applying for a change of program within the university. Interested students should direct admission questions to the specific department of interest to them. Current Temple University students interested in transferring to one of these majors should review the relevant section below, which describes the required change of program sessions. 

Admission to the Nursing Program

Temple's BSN program is a four-year program enabling students to begin fieldwork experience during their first year. The BSN program provides three entry options depending on students' background and education. There is a freshman option for highly qualified high school graduates. Space permitting, the BSN program accepts a limited number of transfer students from current Temple students or from external applicants enrolled in another college or university. Internal transfer admission decisions are highly competitive and made on a space-available basis. This transfer option requires students to begin the nursing program as first-year nursing students. Students admitted via this option will spend eight semesters in Temple's BSN program, entering the program in the fall semester. This option is recommended for Temple students with fewer than 30 college credits. More information about admission to Temple's BSN program is available at BSN Admissions.

Admission to the Health Information Management Program

Prospective first-year students can declare the Pre-Health Information Management major within the College of Public Health. Students following this path should pay careful attention to the requirements and meet with their academic advisor.

During the fall of the sophomore year, students interested in admission to Health Information Management (HIM) must apply to the program. Students may apply prior to completing all of the prerequisites and General Education (GenEd) courses. However, prior to starting the Health Information Management major, a student must successfully complete all pre-professional college work, which includes the University GenEd curriculum and all program prerequisites, at Temple University or another university or college. In order to be considered, applicants must achieve transferable grades in all prerequisites as well as a competitive grade point average (GPA). For more information, prospective students should visit the HIM web site.

Current Temple University Students Transferring to Exercise & Sport Science, Health Professions, Kinesiology, Public Health, Social Work, Speech, Language & Hearing Science, and Recreational Therapy

Current Temple students interested in transferring into Exercise and Sport Science, Health Professions, Kinesiology, Public Health, Social Work, Speech, Language & Hearing Science, and Recreational Therapy must attend a change of program session. These are listed on the College of Public Health web site under Academic Advising. Applications will not be processed until the student attends the required change of program session. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required for admission to any of these programs. Students should review the curriculum and be aware of the quantitative and scientific skills required to successfully complete the courses. In some cases, students will be asked to meet with the advising director to discuss their change of program request.

Student Contact Information

Undergraduate students with general questions are asked to contact the college's Dean's Office at 215-204-5440.

For questions about academic requirements, students should contact the departmental academic advisor. A list of advisors is available at Academic Advising.

Contact information for specific departments is available at the College of Public Health web site. Please select the academics tab at the top of the college page and follow the links for additional department and program information.

Academic Policies & Regulations

Students are responsible for complying with all university-wide academic policies that apply to their individual academic status (Please see Undergraduate Academic Policies). Additional and unique policies, or exceptions for the College of Public Health, appear below. 

Attendance

The College of Public Health desires to promote professional responsibility among its students. It is therefore the policy of the College to place the responsibility for class attendance upon the students. Students are accountable for all work missed due to absence. Instructors are generally not required to make special arrangements or examinations for students who are absent. There are certain courses that require a minimum number of hours of student participation in laboratory or clinical experiences, as established by the professional accrediting agency and/or the academic department concerned. At the beginning of each such course, the department shall make the attendance requirement clearly known to the enrolled students. Excessive absences may, at the option of the department, jeopardize the student's grade and/or continuance in the course.

Dean's List

Each fall and spring semester, those undergraduates who have met the credit hour and academic criteria for their school or college are named to the Dean's List. See the Dean's List policy for specific GPA and credit-hour requirements.

Standards of Scholarship

The grading system is in accordance with the system adopted by Temple University. For students enrolled in this College, a grade of C is the lowest acceptable final grade in major courses, as these are defined in the description of each major. Students not achieving a grade of C or better are required to repeat those courses in which they have failed to demonstrate acceptable performance.

Student Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct

Since students of the College of Public Health are enrolled in professional programs, they are expected to abide by standards of professional conduct and behavior at all times.

The College of Public Health prepares practitioners to fulfill their ideals of service in health or social service settings. In attaining these goals, practitioners must demonstrate exemplary professional behavior, as this is the keystone of the professional associations of the disciplines within this college. The Code of Conduct of Temple University's College of Public Health is intended to contribute to an environment in which excellence in learning and conduct may be fostered.

All terms of the Temple University Student Rights, the Student Conduct Code, and disciplinary procedures described in that code apply to students within the College of Public Health. In addition to the major violations noted by the University code, another action has been identified by the faculty of the College as constituting a major infraction of the code: "Unethical conduct or intentional neglect of duty on clinical practice."

Additionally, most College of Public Health programs prepare students for careers that involve close examination of a person's background before being employed or even engaged in clinical training and field education. Thus, students are strongly encouraged to begin gathering required documentation and clearances immediately after admission into their program so that they have sufficient time to assemble their portfolio well before it is required for field-based learning, including internships. Gathering required background information early also provides sufficient time to address any issues that might postpone or prevent fieldwork. Each program publishes more detailed information on health screenings and background clearances that are used for clinical training and field education.

To learn more about the integral role of clinical and field education in the College of Public Health, please use the following links to explore your area of interest.

College Graduation Requirements

Specific graduation requirements for undergraduate programs in the College of Public Health (CPH) are available on the individual program pages within this Bulletin as well as at CPH Academics.

College Core Course

A key requirement for entering undergraduates is the College Core Course, HRPR 1001 Public Health: The Way We Live, Work and Play. For all students who enrolled in the college prior to fall 2015, this course is strongly recommended, but it will not be required. The course was integrated into existing programs and does not extend time to graduation or increase tuition costs. Students should consult individual program descriptions in this Bulletin to see how the course fits into their programs—replacing either an elective or an existing course requirement—and consult with their program advisors about whether they should or must take the course. 

The course is designed to help students think about contemporary health issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course includes an introduction to the five core areas of public health—biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health services administration, and social and behavioral sciences—and how these areas relate to various health, health care, and human service professions. Public health helps inform decisions that shape the behavior of individuals and communities. Students will analyze health issues such as health promotion, disease prevention, and health care policy from a variety of perspectives. As part of the course, students will work in small interdisciplinary teams to access and evaluate information about a particular individual or population-level health issue, and learn to argue persuasively, both orally and in writing, for interdisciplinary approaches to that health issue. An aim of the course is to engage students' curiosity about how the discipline of public health and interdisciplinary approaches apply to issues students may confront in their future professional work. 

Military Science Courses

Undergraduate students in CPH whose degree programs allow for free electives may apply up to 12 credits of military science courses at the 3000 and 4000 levels in Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC), Military Science (Army ROTC), and Naval Science (Navy ROTC).

Academic Advising

The College of Public Health has an extensive system of academic advising provided by professional and faculty advisors. Professional advisors, coordinated by the Associate Director for Advisement, are available for each department, where they provide assistance with such topics as registration, course scheduling, and transfer credits, as well as referral to other resources. For a complete listing of our professional advising staff and more information on academic advising in the College of Public Health, visit Academic Advising.

In most departments, when students reach junior or senior standing, they are assigned to faculty advisors who assist with mentoring as students progress in their professional training.

Academic advisors strive to avoid errors when advising students about program requirements; however, the College cannot assume liability for errors in advising. Students must, therefore, assume primary responsibility for knowing the requirements for their degree and for acquiring current information about their academic status.

Faculty

William Aaronson, Associate Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Ann B. Addis, Instructor (Clinical), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.A., Northwestern University.

Rebecca Alper, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Susannah Anderson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Tulane University.

Robin Aronow, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.A., University of Delaware.

Sarah Bauerle Bass, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Lisa Bedore, Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Purdue University.

Katherine Bevans, Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Tulane University.

Algie Lakesa Bond, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; M.H.A., Saint Joseph's University.

Kathryn Brzozowski, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; D.S.W., University of Pennsylvania.

Heather J. Burket, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; M.Ed., Temple University.

Scott Burns, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; D.P.T., University of Colorado Denver.

Lois A. Butcher, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

William Cabin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., City University of New York-Hunter College.

Sofia Carreno, Instructor (Clinical), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; M.S.N., Thomas Jefferson University.

Cheri E. Carter, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Delaware.

Susan Caspari, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.A., Temple University.

Elizabeth Chmielewski-Yee, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Marissa Cloutier, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; DSc, Harvard University.

Donna Coffman, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Bradley N. Collins, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton.

Susan Connor, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; O.T.D., Thomas Jefferson University.

James Corbin, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; M.S.W., Temple University.

Aurora J. Crew, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; M.S., Temple University.

Gayle DeDe, Associate Professor (Research), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Boston University.

Susan B. Dickey, Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Patricia DiGiacomo, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; M.S.N., Temple University.

Deirdre Dingman, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; DrPH, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Ann E. Dolloff, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; M.Ed., Temple University.

Jeffrey N. Draine, Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Melanie Drolsbaugh, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.A., Gallaudet University.

John J. Duffy, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; D.N.P., Case Western Reserve University.

Mary Ann Dugan, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; D.N.P., La Salle University.

Levent Dumenci, Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Bari Dzomba, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Alvernia University.

William E. Egan, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; D.P.T., Regis University.

Karin Eyrich-Garg, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis.

Jane Fagan, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; D.P.T., Simmons College.

Jay S. Fagan, Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Courtney Fecske, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; M.S., Indiana University.

Lisa Ferretti, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; M.S.W., University at Albany, State University of New York.

Stuart H. Fine, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; D.H.A., Medical University of South Carolina.

Jennifer Orlet Fisher, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Cathy A. Flite, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; M.Ed., Widener University.

Margaret M. Foley, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Anne Frankel, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Florida International University.

Laurie A. Friedman, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania.

Felicidad M. Garcia, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.S., Columbia University.

Heather M. Gardiner, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

Kimberly Gargin, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; O.T.D., Chatham University.

Jeffrey Gehris, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Letitia Gill Gembala, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; D.N.P., Duquesne University.

Susan Gresko, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania.

Michael T. Halpern, Associate Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; M.D., University of Michigan Medical School.

Joelle D. Hargraves, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; D.N.P., Chatham University.

Kyle Harris, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; M.S., Temple University.

Chantelle Hart, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.

Jonathan M. Hartmann, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.A., Gallaudet University.

Alice J. Hausman, Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton.

Shivayogi V. Hiremath, Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Ilene L. Hollin, Assistant Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Jinyi Hung, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Florida.

Cheryl A. Hyde, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Jennifer K. Ibrahim, Associate Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Larry D. Icard, Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Roger I. Ideishi, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; J.D., Temple University.

Shawn D. Jackson, Assistant Professor (Clinical), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; D.N.P., Temple University.

Graciela Jaschek, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Maryland.

Monika Jelic, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; M.P.H., Boston University.

Resa M. Jones, Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

LaKeetra M. Josey, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Stefan Keller, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Phillips University.

Zebulon V. Kendrick, Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Emily Keshner, Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ed.D., Columbia University.

Julia Kobulsky, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.

Francine P. Kohen, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.S., The Pennsylvania State University.

Sara J. Kovacs, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Rena A. Krakow, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Yale University.

Martha Y. Kubik, Professor, Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

Joseph A. Kumi, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; M.S.W., Florida State University.

Richard Lauer, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.

Stephen J. Lepore, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of California Irvine.

Beth A. Levine, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.S., Boston University.

Barbara A. Little, Instructor (Clinical), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; M.S., La Salle University.

Amy Lynch, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Delaware.

Edwin Maas, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., San Diego State University.

Jamie Mansell, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Nadine Martin, Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Omar Martinez, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; J.D., Indiana University.

Barbara Mastrioni, Associate Professor Emerita, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health.

Carlene A. McAleer, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; D.N.P., Temple University.

Karen McBride, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; M.S., Philadelphia University.

Philip McCallion, Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University at Albany, State University of New York.

Bryan P. McCormick, Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Clemson University.

Jane M. McDevitt, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Brian D. McHugh, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Kimberly McKay, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Widener University.

Alexis McKenney, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ed.D., University of Georgia.

Rochelle Mendonca, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Lois Millner, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College.

C. Daniel Moser, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Sheila L. Moyle, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; O.T.D., Chatham University.

Heather Murphy, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Guelph.

Miguel Muñoz-Laboy, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Dr.P.H., Columbia University.

Bernie Sue Newman, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Emeka Nwadiora, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; J.D., Hofstra University School of Law.

Michael C. O'Hara, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; D.P.T., Temple University.

Cheryl B. Oakman, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College.

Aimee J. Palumbo, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Drexel University.

Joon Young Park, Associate Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.

Carolyn Parks, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

Richard D. Patterson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; D.A.T., University of Idaho.

Elizabeth A. Pfeiffer, Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University.

Jacqueline Phillips, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Heather Porter, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Laura Rauth, Instructor (Clinical), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; M.S.N., Yale University.

Jodi Reich, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Yale University.

James J. Reilly, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Daniel M. Rosney, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

Nancy L. Rothman, Professor, Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; Ed.D., Temple University.

Abby Rudolph, Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Anne C. Russ, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Scott E. Rutledge, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Washington.

Kim Sabourin, Instructor (Clinical), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; M.A., University of Maryland.

Michael L. Sachs, Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Florida State University.

Mark Salzer, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Mayra C. Santiago, Associate Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

David B. Sarwer, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Loyola University Chicago.

Michelle C. Scarpulla, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; M.P.H., Temple University.

Rosalie Schofield, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Brandeis University.

Krista Schroeder, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Brittany Schuler, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Maryland Baltimore.

Jay S. Segal, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Anthony Sgherza, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., New York University.

John W. Shank, Professor Emeritus, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health.

Laura Siminoff, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Mary C. Sinnott, Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; D.P.T., MGH Institute of Health Professions.

Michael R. Sitler, Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ed.D., New York University.

Brandon S. Snead, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; M.S., Temple University.

Gretchen A. Snethen, Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Indiana University.

Mary Stec, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Widener University.

Gerry A. Stefanatos, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; D.Phil., Oxford University.

Barbara A. Stephens, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; D.N.P., Temple University.

Ricky L. Swalm, Associate Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Gabriel Tajeu, Assistant Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; DrPH, University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Brandie Taylor, Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Brenda Teichman, Instructor (Clinical), Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; M.S., Western Governors University.

Elizabeth Thomas, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Stephen Thomas, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Delaware.

Christopher Thompson, Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Illinois.

Elizabeth Diane Thompson, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; D.P.T., Temple University.

Ryan T. Tierney, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Nanette Tomicek, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Gina Tripicchio, Assistant Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Carole Tucker, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

Sylvia Twersky, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Gena B. Vargas, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Clemson University.

Rebecca Vernon, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; D.P.T., University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center.

Sharon G.E. Washington, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ed.D., Columbia University.

Annette Willgens, Associate Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Northcentral University.

Caitlin N. Wolak, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; M.P.H., Temple University.

W. Geoffrey Wright, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Brandeis University.

Jingwei Wu, Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Indiana University.

Andrew Yannaccone, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine.

Marsha Zibalese Crawford, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; D.S.W., Howard University.

Yaara Zisman-Ilani, Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Haifa.

Lisa S. Zoll, Instructor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; M.S.W., Temple University.