Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies

We live in a time of ever-faster global integration. People, goods, services, and ideas now move with astonishing speed across national boundaries. Many of the major issues that shape our lives are global in scope: war and terrorism, climate change, migration, human rights, public health, economic growth and decline, religion and ideologies, fashion and music, media and technology. This interdisciplinary program invites students to reach across disciplines and learn from a wide array of knowledge and methods in order to be better prepared for a global world.

The Global Studies curriculum offers a foundation through a set of four introductory courses, as well as specialization in one of three concentrations: Global Security, Global Economy, and Global Cultures. The introductory courses will prepare you for the concentrations by studying alternative disciplinary and problem-based approaches to global studies. Within this general framework, the three concentrations will allow the students to identify a specialized program of study drawing from a structured set of concentration-specific requirements and electives, culminating in a research-based and writing-intensive capstone seminar.

In order to develop a world perspective, students in Global Studies will take two full years (through 4th semester) of a foreign language and will either participate in an approved study abroad program or take additional area studies courses. Students will work with their advisor and the Education Abroad office to identify the best fit with their language skills, disciplinary interests, career plans, and financial capabilities.

Career Potential

Global Studies is not a major with a limiting, predefined career destination. Today, a large and growing number of careers can and do feature international or global components. The major in Global Studies will offer students a broad but rigorous course of study that will combine the development of a sophisticated understanding of global changes, cultures, and perspectives while building critical analytical, communication, and intellectual skills they will need in any professional career.

This major is an obvious choice for students aiming specifically for an international career in government, business, or the non-profit sector, and its interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary nature will provide an appropriate foundation for work or graduate study in any field affected by global change. 

Summary of Degree Requirements

University Requirements:

  • MATH 0701 (4 s.h.) and/or ENG 0701 (4 s.h.), if required by placement testing.
  • All Temple students must take a minimum of two writing-intensive courses as part of the major. The specific courses required for this major are GBST 2096 and GBST 4096.
  • Students must complete requirements of the General Education (GenEd) Program. See the General Education section of the Undergraduate Bulletin for more details.

College of Liberal Arts Requirements:

  • Completion of a minimum of 123 credits, including:
    • 90 credits in CLA/CST courses;
    • 45 credits of which must be at the upper level (numbered 2000-4999).
      • For Social Science majors, 6 upper level credits (numbered 2000-4999) must be taken in Humanities Subject Areas: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Greek (Ancient), Greek and Roman Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of Liberal Arts, Art History in the Tyler School of Art, or any department in the College of Science and Technology.
    • A minimum GPA of 2.0, cumulatively, in CLA/CST coursework, and in the major.
    • Only courses in which a student receives a grade of at least C- can satisfy GenEd, major, minor, or CLA Foreign Language and Global Studies requirements.
    • Professional Development Requirement

      • All students in the College of Liberal Arts are required to take a 1 credit seminar in professional development. CLA 1002 Professional Development for Liberal Arts Majors is the appropriate course option for this major. Other courses that fulfill this requirement are ENG 1801 Career Seminar and PSY 1002 Careers in Psychology.
    • Foreign Language/Global Studies Requirements:
      • Global Studies majors are required to complete the fourth level of a foreign language, which exceeds the CLA minimum requirement. No additional coursework is required.
      • Notes on Foreign Language Study
        • The third level of language is numbered 1003 in French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese and numbered 2001 in all other foreign language subjects.
        • Students are strongly encouraged to take the third level of a foreign language as it is the minimum required for election to the prestigious honor society Phi Beta Kappa. (Taking the course does not guarantee admission but not taking it guarantees exclusion.)
        • See the College of Liberal Arts Policies section of this Bulletin for more information on the Foreign Language Placement, Regression in Coursework, and guidelines for students' other experiences with language.

General Electives are typically one-third of a student's program of study and can be focused on a second major, a minor, or towards some other personal enrichment or professional goals. See an academic advisor for assistance in developing an academic plan for these courses.

Major Requirements (33-55 credits - varies according to foreign language placement and regional enrichment options):

Foundation courses
GBST 2096Introduction to Global Studies3
POLS 1301International Politics3
ECON 1101Macroeconomic Principles3
HIST 2819Global Connections3
Concentration Requirements
Select a concentration and choose 6 courses from its list (below):18
Global Security Concentration
Global Economy Concentration
Global Cultures Concentration
Senior Capstone Seminar
GBST 4096Capstone Seminar in Global Studies3
Regional Enrichment
Select one of the following:0-6
Study abroad at a TU-approved program
Two area studies courses from one region as outlined below:
Africa and the Middle East
African Civilization
Modern Arabic Literature in Translation
Contemporary Arab Society in Film (in Translation)
African Development
Israelis and Palestinians
Third World History
Introduction to African History
Cold War Africa
Modern Islamic History
Imperialism, Race, and Empire
African Diaspora
Southern Africa: A History
Modern India
Israel: History, Politics and Society
Modern Middle East
Colonialism and Decolonization
Mideast Politics
Jerusalem: The Politics of Space
Asia
Peoples of South Asia
Modern Asia
Practical Asian Society and Culture
South Asia: Peoples, Culture, Experiences
Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature in Translation
Contemporary Chinese Urban Film and Fiction in Translation
East and South Asia
Environmental Problems in Asia
Third World History
Vietnam War
Introduction to East Asia: China
Introduction to East Asia: Japan
Introduction to Southeast Asia: Insular
Introduction to Southeast Asia: Mainland
Modern Islamic History
Imperialism, Race, and Empire
The Chinese Revolution
Contemporary China
Modern India
History of Vietnam
Vietnam, 1945-1992: Resistance, War and Society
Modern and Contemporary Japanese Literature in Translation
Japanese Literature in Film
Japan and the Changing World Order
China: State and Society
East Asia and the United States
Indian Philosophies and Religions
Europe
German Culture through Film
History of Nazi Germany
History of Central Europe, 1618-1871
20th Century Europe: A Continent in Crisis
Rise of the European Dictators
Europe Divided and United, 1939-1995
Anti-Semitism/Holocaust/Racism
History of England
Italian Culture through Film
Contemporary Politics of Europe
British Government and Politics
Politics of the European Union
Latin America/Caribbean
Peoples of Latin America
Latin American Social Struggles
Introduction to Latin America
Civilization and Modernity in the Caribbean
History of Brazil
Contemporary Mexico
Perspectives on Latin America
Peoples of Latin America
Area Studies: Latin American Development
Comparative Political Systems in Latin America
Foreign Language
Fourth-semester proficiency in one foreign language0-16 credits
Total Credit Hours33-55

Global Security Concentration (6 courses)

The quest for security, and the seemingly endless recurrence of interstate war are fundamental features of an anarchical world of sovereign states. Historically, this led students of security to focus on state power, military strategy, geopolitics, diplomacy and conflict in the international arena. In the 21st century, interstate wars have been joined by both increasingly destructive civil wars within countries, and by international and global terrorism perpetrated by non-state actors. In this concentration, students will draw on disciplines as diverse as history, political science, anthropology, geography and criminal justice to understand the causes of war, the security strategies of states, and the rise of new and challenging security threats in the 21st century.

Gateway 1
Select one of the following:3
Post-Cold War Security
U.S. Foreign Policy
Gateway 2
Select one of the following:3
20th Century Europe: A Continent in Crisis
Superpower America
Electives
Select four additional courses from the following options:12
Violence, War, and Revolution
Violence: An Anthropological Approach
Organized Crime
Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Global Security
Geography of Hazards
Medical Geography
Vietnam War
20th Century Europe: A Continent in Crisis
Europe Divided and United, 1939-1995
Central Europe Through Wars and Revolution, 1848-1989
Cold War Africa
Imperialism, Race, and Empire
Peace, Conflict, and Social Change
World War I
World War II
Gender, War, and Society
America's Rise to Globalism
Superpower America
Blood and Iron: 19th Century European Diplomacy
Modern Middle East
Theories of War and Peace
Post-Cold War Security
Politics of the Global Economy
International Organization
U.S. Foreign Policy
Globalization: Politics and Political Economy 1
1

These courses require prerequisites beyond those covered in the Global Studies Foundation courses; students wishing to take these courses should plan accordingly.

Global Economy Concentration (6 courses)

Economic globalization is one of the defining features of the contemporary world. This concentration introduces students to fundamental features of the global economy from multiple disciplinary perspectives, including in the areas of trade, finance, and development. It studies the origins and consequences of globalization for development and growth, income and poverty, literacy and health, as well as political, demographic, environmental, and cultural changes. Students examine the evolution of cooperation among states in managing the global economy, and the role of history, politics, and technology in shaping international, national, and local relations.

Gateway 1
ECON 1102Microeconomic Principles 13
Gateway 2
Select one of the following:3
Economics of Development and Growth 2
International Trade 2
International Monetary Economics 2
Gateway 3
Select one of the following:3
Urban Systems in a Global Economy
Politics of the Global Economy
Electives
Select 3 additional courses from the following options:9
Globalization and Localization
Economics of Development and Growth 2
International Trade 2
International Monetary Economics 2
Economic Geography
Urban Systems in a Global Economy
African Development
International Urbanization
Geography of Travel and Tourism
Environment & Development 2
World Economy Since 1945
Comparative Politics: Developing Nations
Politics of the Global Economy
Politics of Modern Capitalism
Globalization: Politics and Political Economy 2
Globalization: Causes, Promises and Discontents
Global Development
Global Health
1

ECON 1102 is, together with ECON 1101 (a Foundation course for all Global Studies majors), the basic requirement for all upper-division Economics courses. Both courses should therefore be taken as soon as possible in the course sequence for all students in the Global Economy concentration.

2

These courses require prerequisites beyond those covered in the Global Studies Foundation courses; students wishing to take these courses should plan accordingly.

Global Cultures Concentration (6 courses)

The Global Cultures concentration studies cultural formation, cultural change, and cultural interaction among peoples across the world. "Culture" is defined as learned systems of values, beliefs, and practices that bind a group of people together and give common meaning to their lived experiences. These groups can be local, regional, national or international; they are shaped by various structures of power and are continuously migrating. Students in the Global Cultures concentration will examine the interaction of global and local cultures and study aspects of cultural circulation, transaction, and mobility through courses in Literature, Film, Religion, History, Anthropology, and Sociology.

Gateway courses
Select two of the following:6
Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures
Imperialism, Race, and Empire
Religion and Society
Globalization: Causes, Promises and Discontents
Electives
Select four of the following:12
African Civilization
Languages and Cultures of West Africa 1
Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology
Globalization and Localization
Anthropology and Culture Change
The Anthropology of Tourism
Modern Arabic Literature in Translation
Contemporary Arab Society in Film (in Translation)
Modern Asia
Practical Asian Society and Culture
Asian American Experiences
South Asia: Peoples, Culture, Experiences
The Modern Novel
Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures
International Film
Modern World Fiction 1
Contemporary World Fiction in English 1
Topics in Postcolonial Literature 1
Postcolonial Theory
Images of the City in Popular Culture
Transportation & Culture
Cold War Africa
Civilization and Modernity in the Caribbean
Modern Islamic History
Third World Issues through Film
Imperialism, Race, and Empire
African Diaspora
Anti-Semitism/Holocaust/Racism
Gender, Class, Nation
Gender, War, and Society
American Icons
Women's Lives in Modern Europe
Caliban's World: Cultural Politics in the 20th Century Americas
Modern Middle East
The City in History
Perspectives on Latin America
Latin America through Film and Fiction
Caribbean Literature and Culture
Religion and Society
Women in Religion and Society
Indian Philosophies and Religions
Introduction to Buddhism
What Is Christianity?
Introduction to Islam
Religion in Contemporary Africa
Monks, Masters, and Magicians: Religion in Premodern Chinese Literature
Yoga & Tantric Mysticism
Traditional Religions of Africa
African Religions and New World Culture
Philosophy of Culture
Immigrant America: Belonging and Integration
Global Development
Comparative Family Studies
Sociology of Music: Nation, Race, Class and Gender in Argentina and Brazil
Sexuality and Gender
1

These courses require prerequisites beyond those covered in the Global Studies Foundation courses; students wishing to take these courses should plan accordingly.

Suggested Academic Plan

Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies

Requirements for New Students starting in the 2016-2017 Academic Year

Year 1
FallCredit Hours
ENG 0802, 0812, or 0902Analytical Reading and Writing [GW]4
GenEd Quantitative Literacy Course [GQ]4
Foreign Language 1001 - first level4
GenEd Breadth Course3
 Term Credit Hours15
Spring
IH 0851 or 0951Mosaic: Humanities Seminar I [GY]3
ECON 1101Macroeconomic Principles3
Foreign Language - second level4
POLS 1301International Politics3
GenEd Breadth Course3
 Term Credit Hours16
Year 2
Fall
IH 0852 or 0952Mosaic: Humanities Seminar II [GZ]3
Foreign Language - third level3
GBST 2096Introduction to Global Studies [WI]3
CLA 2000+ Elective3
GenEd Breadth Course3
 Term Credit Hours15
Spring
CLA 1002Professional Development for Liberal Arts Majors1
HIST 2819Global Connections3
Foreign Language - fourth level3
GenEd Breadth Course3
GenEd Breadth Course3
CLA/CST 0800-4999 Elective2
 Term Credit Hours15
Year 3
Fall
Global Studies Concentration 2000+ Course3
Global Studies Concentration 2000+ Course3
CLA/CST 2000+ Humanities/CST Course3
GenEd Breadth Course3
One 0800-4999 Elective in Any School or College2
Global Studies Concentration Course3
 Term Credit Hours17
Spring
Global Studies Area Requirement13
Global Studies Area Requirement13
CLA/CST 2000+ Humanities/CST Course3
CLA 2000+ Elective3
GenEd Breadth Course3
 Term Credit Hours15
Year 4
Fall
Global Studies Concentration 2000+ Course3
Global Studies Concentration 2000+ Course3
CLA 2000+ Elective 3
CLA 2000+ Elective 3
One 0800-4999 Elective in Any School or College3
 Term Credit Hours15
Spring
GBST 4096Capstone Seminar in Global Studies [WI]3
Global Studies Concentration Course3
CLA 2000+ Elective3
One 0800-4999 Elective in Any School or College3
One 0800-4999 Elective in Any School or College3
 Term Credit Hours15
 Total Credit Hours: 123
1

Students are encouraged to study abroad, but if not possible, can replace with the area studies requirements as noted in this grid.