College of Education and Human Development

The College of Education and Human Development at Temple University promotes education – in schools, in the workplace, in organizations, and through community engagement – as a critically important way to achieve social justice. Our mission is to prepare our students to become agents of change who employ leading-edge understandings and evidence-based practices in any setting in which they might work. Our faculty include experts not only in early childhood/elementary, middle grades, and secondary teacher education, but also in advocacy and organizational development, applied behavior analysis, career and technical education, counseling psychology, educational psychology/human development, higher education, leadership, school psychology, special education, teaching English to speakers of other languages, and urban education.

In our research, we work both to conduct well-designed investigations that have the potential to improve learning and teaching, especially for historically underserved populations, and to provide effective mentorship of master's and doctoral students so that they can engage in similar kinds of investigations on their own. In our teaching, we strive to provide practitioners and prospective practitioners with deep understandings both of research and theory and of how research and theory can be translated into effective practice. As a result of our strategic location in North Philadelphia and our long history of collaboration with the School District of Philadelphia and other community partners, the College of Education and Human Development is uniquely situated to have a collective impact in the surrounding neighborhoods. We also endeavor, however, to bring our work to the largest possible audience in the city of Philadelphia, the region, the nation, and the world.

While the official date for the founding of the College of Education and Human Development is usually given as 1919 when Teachers College was founded, the college has included teacher preparation as part of its curricula almost from its inception. It is clear from Temple's history that the unofficial founder of the college was Laura Carnell, who began a program for the preparation of kindergarten teachers as early as 1895. The College's initial programs in elementary and then secondary education were offered largely in response to the School District of Philadelphia's decision that higher positions in the city's school system would be open only to those with a college degree. As a consequence, the college began offering two-, three-, and four-year programs to teachers, as well as extension work, with day and evening courses five days a week and on Saturday mornings. This intimate relationship between the college and the School District of Philadelphia characterizes almost all of the college's history. Programs of graduate study at the master's level were introduced in 1923, with the Doctor of Education degree first awarded in 1931. 

Historically, Temple's College of Education and Human Development has had a significant impact on local and regional practice. The College continues to be a large provider of teachers for the School District of Philadelphia and for many suburban districts. Many principals and superintendents of the neighboring regions have received their degrees from Temple. Many of the school psychologists, counselors, educational researchers, and other education professionals have been prepared at Temple. In a very real sense, the College of Education and Human Development has helped to shape the educational direction of the region. In addition, recognizing that education occurs both in and out of school, the College has in recent years diversified its programs to provide preparation to those who plan to work with learners across the lifespan not only in schools but also in businesses and community-based organizations.

Programs

Degree Programs and Certificates

Certificates Not Currently Open for Enrollment

  • Career and Technical Education/K-12

  • English Education/7-12

  • Instructional Coaching Endorsement

  • Mathematics Education/7-12

  • Middle Grades Education/4-8

  • Science Education/7-12

  • Social Studies Education/7-12

  • World/Foreign Languages Education/K-12

Graduate Faculty

Gregory Anderson, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., City University of New York.

Janelle M. Bailey, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Arizona.

Julie L. Booth, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University.

Joseph Boyle, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Carol B. Brandt, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of New Mexico.

Wanda M. Brooks, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

James P. Byrnes, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Temple University.

Sarah A. Cordes, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., New York University.

Maia Bloomfield Cucchiara, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

James Earl Davis, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Meixia Ding, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Arthur G. Dowdy, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Temple University.

Joseph P. DuCette, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Cornell University.

Richard M. Englert, Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ed.D., University of California Los Angeles.

Armando X. Estrada, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Texas at El Paso.

Frank H. Farley, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of London.

Edward Fergus, Associate Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Catherine A. Fiorello, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Kentucky.

Timothy P. Fukawa-Connelly, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Maryland.

Allison Gilmour, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.

John Hall, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Insook Han, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ed.D., Columbia University, Teachers College.

Annemarie H. Hindman, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Xu (Lilya) Jiang, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of South Carolina.

Jennifer Johnson, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.

Paul Jones, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Temple University.

Will J. Jordan, Associate Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Columbia University, Teachers College.

Avshalom Kaplan, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Janice C. Laurence, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., George Mason University.

Kelly M. McGinn, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Temple University.

Sabina Neugebauer, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ed.D., Harvard University.

Kristie Jones Newton, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.

Timothy J. Patterson, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Columbia University, Teachers College.

Laura Pendergast, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Charles Price, Associate Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Graduate Center, City University of New York.

Lia E. Sandilos, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Jayminn S. Sanford-DeShields, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ed.D., Harvard University.

W. Joel Schneider, Associate Professor, Department of Policy, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Michael W. Smith, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Matthew J. Tincani, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Renee M. Tobin, Professor, Department of Psychological Studies in Education, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Texas A and M University.

Jason C. Travers, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Matthew J. Elvis Wagner, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ed.D., Columbia University, Teachers College.

Barbara A. Wasik, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ph.D., Temple University.

Christine A. Woyshner, Professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development; Ed.D., Harvard University.