Psychology (PSY)

Courses

PSY 0815. Language in Society. 3 Credit Hours.

How did language come about? How many languages are there in the world? How do people co-exist in countries where there are two or more languages? How do babies develop language? Should all immigrants take a language test when applying for citizenship? Should English become an official language of the United States? In this course we will address these and many other questions, taking linguistic facts as a point of departure and considering their implications for our society. Through discussions and hands-on projects, students will learn how to collect, analyze, and interpret language data and how to make informed decisions about language and education policies as voters and community members. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ANTH 0815/0915, Asian Studies 0815, Chinese 0815, CSCD 0815, EDUC 0815/0915, English 0815, Italian 0815, Russian 0815, or Spanish 0815.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 0816. Workings of the Mind. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course we will discuss conscious and unconscious mental processes. We will start by considering the nature of the unconscious mind and will examine evidence for the existence of unconscious processes in memory, problem solving, behavior in social settings, and our attitudes, beliefs, and opinions. We will then study the nature of consciousness from psychological and philosophical perspectives, with a focus on trying to answer the questions of: what is consciousness, what does consciousness do, and why does consciousness exist. For many of the issues we will discuss, there is no scientific consensus regarding the right answer or the most correct theory. Be prepared to think critically and to tolerate perplexity. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Psychology 0916.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 0817. Brain Matters. 3 Credit Hours.

One of the last frontiers in science is the brain. We know a great deal about the structure and function of the brain and nervous system, but it is challenging to comprehend fully the complexity of a system made up of 100 billion components that are interacting with one another using tens of trillions of connections that can change and rewire during development and aging. Neuroscience is the multidisciplinary field in which brain research falls. Neuroscience is one of the fastest growing domains in all of science - and good bet for a future career path. Neuroscientists investigate brain function from the level of molecular genetics, to cellular dynamics, to brain anatomy and physiology, to relations between brain, behavior, and cognition, to brain development and aging, to diseases of the brain. In this course, we will touch on knowledge about the brain at all these levels, and more. We will also discuss case studies of brain impairment. NOTE: This course fulfills a Science & Technology (GS) requirement for students under GenEd and Science & Technology Second Level (SB) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Neuroscience 0817.

Course Attributes: GS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 0818. Human Sexuality. 3 Credit Hours.

Our sexuality is a core part of being human. We often think about sexuality in terms of the physical and reproductive aspects of sex. But our sexuality is complex and dynamic. We will address this dynamic complexity as we explore the physical, psychological, relational, and cultural aspects of sexuality. The goal of this course is to broaden your perspective of human sexuality, and deepen your understanding and awareness of your own sexuality and the many influences on this essential part of yourself. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: SOC 0818/0918.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 0825. Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences. 4 Credit Hours.

Psychological, political, social, and economic arguments and knowledge frequently depend on the use of numerical data. A psychologist might hypothesize that I.Q. is attributable to environmental or genetic factors; a politician might claim that hand gun control legislation will reduce crime; a sociologist might assert that social mobility is more limited in the United States than in other countries, and an economist might declare that globalization lowers the incomes of U.S. workers. How can we evaluate these arguments? Using examples from psychology, sociology, political science, and economics, students will examine how social science methods and statistics help us understand the social world. The goal is to become critical consumers of quantitative material that appears in scholarship, the media, and everyday life. NOTE: This course fulfills the Quantitative Literacy (GQ) requirement for students under GenEd and a Quantitative Reasoning (QA or QB) requirement for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed SOC 0825, SOC 0925, POLS 0825, POLS 0825, or ANTH 0825.

Course Attributes: GQ

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC4 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC5 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 0916. Honors Workings of the Mind. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course we will discuss conscious and unconscious mental processes. We will start by considering the nature of the unconscious mind and will examine evidence for the existence of unconscious processes in memory, problem solving, behavior in social settings, and our attitudes, beliefs, and opinions. We will then study the nature of consciousness from psychological and philosophical perspectives, with a focus on trying to answer the questions of: what is consciousness, what does consciousness do, and why does consciousness exist. For many of the issues we will discuss, there is no scientific consensus regarding the right answer or the most correct theory. Be prepared to think critically and to tolerate perplexity. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Psychology 0816.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GB, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1001. Introduction to Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

How do scientists study human behavior? How do others influence our behavior? What is a psychological disorder? These questions and more are reviewed in this course, which covers the basic concepts, methods, theories, and findings in Psychology. Topics include research methods, the nervous system, human development, social psychology, personality, and psychopathology. Duplicate credit warning: Students who have earned credits for PSY 1061 will not earn additional credits for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1002. Careers in Psychology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course, designed to be taken by students in their first year as a psychology major, introduces students to the psychology major, the main subfields within the discipline of psychology, and the numerous opportunities within the major. It also will inform students of the various career and graduate school options that are available to psychology majors after graduation.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1003. Statistics for Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to statistics in psychology. We will spend the semester learning the concepts and corresponding methods that will allow us to ask the question, "But how do you know that is true?" Statistics are essential in allowing us to assess whether or not an observed phenomenon might have occurred by chance alone. Additionally, we will read psychological journal articles that utilize the statistics we are learning so that we can see how psychologists use and write about statistics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 0702|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC4 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC5 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 1004. Critical Thinking in Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

How do you evaluate the strength of a claim made in a magazine, news program, or research article? This course will provide you with basic skills and information to systematically critique claims and research in the popular press and research literature. You will be introduced to basic research concepts, such as correlation vs. causation, common biases, hypotheses, dependent/independent variables, validity, and reliability. You will apply this knowledge to evaluating a wide range of ideas and research in psychology.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 1009. Discovery Series - Perspectives on Psychology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course, developed for first-year students, sophomores and/or new transfer students is designed to introduce the student to the psychology major, the main sub-fields within the discipline of psychology, and the numerous opportunities within the major. A variety of hands-on experiences will enable the students to make informed decisions about their choice of major and about options within their major.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1061. Psychology as a Social Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines human behavior from the perspective of four major areas. It begins with the study of human development from infancy to adulthood, proceeds to a consideration of the individual existing within social groups, and then examines the study of personality and psychopathology. The course finishes with a discussion of the application of psychological knowledge to areas of societal concern, including psychological therapy, health psychology, and organizational/business psychology. NOTE: (1) Credit will not be given for this course and Psychology C050. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual & Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. (3) Duplicate credit warning: Students who have earned credits for PSY 1001 will not earn additional credits for this course.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1062. Psychology as a Social Science. 1 Credit Hour.

A companion course to Psychology 1061 (C060) for first-term freshmen. This course provides guidance with the assignments of the core course. Emphasis is on reading, listening, speaking, and writing within the context of the core course. Assistance is also given in the continued development of English-language skills, especially academic reading and the acquisition of a general academic vocabulary. NOTE: Offered at Temple University Japan only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1071. Psychology as a Natural Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines human and animal behavior from a natural science perspective, providing the student with a sound basis in the biological determinants of behavior. The course begins with a foundation of neuropsychology, including brain processes, behavior genetics and evolutionary psychology. It continues with an examination of sensation and perception, the processes that provide us with information about the world and that allow us to interpret that information. The study of basic processes of learning, motivation, and emotion is followed by the study of cognitive psychology, including higher learning processes of memory, thinking, and problem solving. NOTE: Credit will not be given for this course and Psychology 0051.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1110. Topics in Psychology I. 3 Credit Hours.

Individual treatment of issues regarding the inner workings of human behavior. Each offering deals with a specific aspect of behavior and motivation pertaining to life in today's society. Previous topics: women and therapy, exploring human nature, and drugs and the mind. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PSY 1113. Psychology and Community. 3 Credit Hours.

How do real and fictional Utopian communities rearrange the usual social order? How do they define gender, deliver care, regulate competition, encourage cooperation, and create social justice? We will read about real and fictional communities. You will learn about intentional communities that have been established in the United States and other parts of the world. Each class member will choose one community to visit and learn about in depth. In some cases you will be able to visit in person, in other cases you can visit online, by e-mail or by phone. We will compare alternative visions of the good life and compare fiction and reality.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1120. Current Topics in Psychology II. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a second topics course in which selected psychological underpinnings of human behavior are explored. Each topic deals with a specific aspect of behavior and motivation pertaining to life in today's society. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PSY 1167. Foundations in Statistical Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to statistics in the behavioral and social sciences. Covers quantitative description, probability, and basic methods of statistical inference. Emphasizes critical approach in interpreting applications. NOTE: (1) MATH 1013 (C067) and Sociology 1167 (C067) are comparable courses. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Quantitative Reasoning B (QB) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: QB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1174. Psychology of Food. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will consider the complex relationship between humans and what they eat. The course will consider the psychology of food at all levels of psychology, from perception (e.g., how smell, sight, sound, feel, and taste influence flavor) to cognition (e.g., how memory influences how much we eat), development (e.g., how food preferences develop), and psychopathology (e.g., what are the causes of eating disorders). The course is open to nonmajors who are interested in learning about psychology and how it can help us understand everyday behaviors. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1901. Honors: Introduction to Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

How do scientists study human behavior? How do others influence our behavior? What is a psychological disorder? These questions and more are reviewed in this course, which covers the basic concepts, methods, theories, and findings in Psychology. Topics include research methods, the nervous system, human development, social psychology, personality, and psychopathology.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 1996. Honors Psychology as a Social Science. 3 Credit Hours.

Enables Honors students to cover subject matter of Psychology 1061 (C060) while following their own interests through individual projects and readings. NOTE: (1) Check class schedule for semesters offered. (2) This course can be used to satisfy a university Core Individual & Society (IN) and Writing Intensive (WI) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 2101. Foundations of Cognitive Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of recent research and theory in the areas of verbal learning and cognitive processes. Learning and retention of verbal materials, thinking and problem solving, and the relationship between language and thought.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2102. Foundations of Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the student to cognition and social behavior from an evolutionary and comparative perspective. The cognitive portion of the course presents the methods employed and results obtained during field observations and laboratory experiments on animal cognitive processes. The social behavior portion will focus on social behaviors found in wild animals with special attention to those also seen in humans. Evolutionary theory, especially as it applies to social behavior, will be presented and the course will overview the methods and findings of the field called evolutionary psychology, which presently investigates selected aspects of human cognition and social behavior. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2103. Foundations of Learning and Behavior Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course begins with introduction to a system of principles that account for the acquisition and maintenance of both normal and problematic behavior. Building upon this, applied behavior analysis will be illustrated with examples such as useful parenting techniques, the combining of simple into complex skills, interventions for severely problematic behavior, and early interventions for autism. The basics of Pavlovian conditioning will also be included, emphasizing their role in clinical phenomena and in drug addiction. The concluding phase of the course will be concerned with functional analyses of verbal behavior in typical human interactions, as well as in the origins of awareness and self-control.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2104. Foundations of Sensation and Perception. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will describe how we experience the world. It will describe the biological sensors we use to gather information about the world and the psychological processes involved in interpreting that information. By the end of the course, students should be able to give an answer to the question: How do we see the world? The class will be lecture format with frequent opportunities to ask questions of the immediate material as well as broader questions about how the material may apply to other areas of psychology.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2168. Inferential Methods in Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Concentrates on useful methods for drawing inferences from sample statistics. Included are hypothesis-testing methods for means, proportions, frequencies, and correlations. Analysis of variance methods are covered for one- and two-factor designs.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2196. Scientific Thinking in Psychology. 4 Credit Hours.

This course examines the scientific method and its application in psychology and other fields. It covers topics such as the philosophical foundations of scientific method, the logic of research methods, specific methodologies and their uses and limitations, the evaluation of research, and research ethics. A major goal of the course is development of the ability to critically evaluate scientific and other information. Students will design, conduct, and evaluate research, do literature searches and learn to write in scientific style. NOTE: This course is for majors and minors only.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 2201. Foundations of Psychopathology. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the principal forms of emotional and behavioral disorders; their causes, symptoms, course, assessment, and treatment. Topics include childhood disturbances, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, and substance use disorders.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2301. Foundations of Developmental Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Human development across the life span. The role of genetic factors, maturation, learning and socio-cultural factors on the development of motivation, cognitive functions, social and emotional adjustment.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2401. Foundations of Social Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce you to the theoretical perspectives, research methods, and empirical findings of social psychology. Social psychology is the scientific study of how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are affected by the real or imagined presence of others. More specifically, the four main goals of this course are for you to learn: the major concepts, research findings, and issues in the field of social psychology; how social psychologists derive and test their theories and hypotheses through research; how subtle situational factors affect behavior; and how social psychology applies to your own life.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2402. Foundations of Industrial and Organizational Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the application of psychological theory, techniques, and research to industry. Selection, training, motivation, job satisfaction, job evaluation, performance measurements, leadership, and other topics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2501. Foundations of Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the neurobiology of behavior from the level of neuron to complex neural system interactions. Topics range from the neurobiology of sensory perception and movement to the neurobiology of learning and mental illness.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2502. Foundations of Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

The role of the brain in cognition. Neural basis of perception, language, learning, memory, thinking, and creativity. Neural pathology and the consequences for behavior. Neuropsychological assessment techniques.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2601. Foundations of Health Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an overview of the field of health psychology, which focuses on the links between behavior and mental processes and health status and health behaviors. Health psychology is concerned with the promotion and maintenance of health, the prevention of illness, as well as the treatment of illness. Emphasis will be placed on theoretical analysis of health psychology (e.g., theory of planned behavior/reasoned action, health belief model, general adaptation syndrome, locus of control). Clinical applications may include smoking cessation programs, alcohol use interventions, weight control and eating disorders treatment, management of chronic pain and terminal illnesses, improvement of health care utilization and adherence, stress management, and the increasing social support to improve health outcomes.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 2901. Honors: Foundations of Cognitive Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of recent research and theory in the areas of verbal learning and cognitive processes. Learning and retention of verbal materials, thinking and problem solving, and the relationship between language and thought.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 2931. Honors: Foundations of Developmental Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Human development across the life span. The role of genetic factors, maturation, learning and socio-cultural factors on the development of motivation, cognitive functions, social and emotional adjustment.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 2991. Honors Research I. 4 Credit Hours.

Topics arranged by student and instructor.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PSY 3000. Topics in Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics in current developments in the major subdivisions of psychology. NOTE: Check course schedule for topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3002. Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

The course introduces the student to cognition and social behavior from an evolutionary and comparative perspective. The comparative psychology (i.e., animal cognition) portion of the course presents the methods employed and results obtained during field observations and laboratory experiments on animal cognitive processes. Evolutionary theory, especially as it applies to social behavior, will be presented. The social behavior portion of the course will focus on social behaviors found in wild animals with special attention to those also seen in humans. The course will survey the methods and findings of the field called evolutionary psychology, which investigates selected aspects of human cognition and social behavior. The student can expect to obtain basic familiarity with the concepts and findings of those closely-related fields. Duplicate credit warning: Students who have earned credits for PSY 2102 will not earn additioinal credits for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3003. Advanced Undergraduate Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is meant to give psychology majors who have already taken a basic course in inferential statistics (e.g., Statistics for Psychology; PSY 1003) exposure to more advanced techniques commonly used in psychological research and to bridge the gap between basic and graduate level statistics for those considering a post-graduate degree in psychology. Topics will include linear regression, repeated-measures ANOVA, multi-factorial ANOVA, and several nonparametric alternatives to "standard" inferential tests. In addition to significance testing, this course will focus on the measurement and interpretation of effect size and power. Students will also learn how to perform data analysis using the SPSS statistical software package.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3005. Affective Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

The brain is not just a thinking machine; it is also a feeling machine. This course explores the neural substrates behind emotions such as love, trust, fear, and pleasure. We will also discuss the relationship between emotions and cognition, the effect of emotions on animal and human behavior, and the biological basis of affective disorders such as anxiety and depression.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2502|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR NSCI 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3006. Stress and the Brain. 3 Credit Hours.

Stress, in some form or other, is part of our everyday lives. How we respond to stress can either ensure our immediate survival or threaten long-term physical and mental well-being. This course will survey the clinical and preclinical research to understand how the brain initiates stress responses, and how stress, in turn, impacts the brain to alter behavior. The role that stress plays in the development of disorders, such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, will also be explored.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2502|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR NSCI 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3096. Conducting Psychological Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This writing intensive course offers a practical introduction to research methods and the process of conducting research in psychology. Students will perform all of the steps involved in a research study, from formulating an idea and hypothesis to presenting results in a paper and presentation. Ethical considerations relevant to research will be emphasized in the course.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3100. Topics: Brain, Behavior and Cognition. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced level topics course; topics vary by instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2502|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2104|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3131. Problem Solving and Creative Thinking. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will begin with a historical survey of approaches to the study of creativity, concentrating on questions of definition and issues concerning how creativity can be measured. The relationship between creative thinking and problem solving will be discussed. The next section will examine different perspectives that researchers have taken toward the study of creativity. Examples are: (1) genius and madness; (2) developing tests of creative thinking and studying the creative personality; (3) the cognitive view, which considers creative thinking to be a straightforward extension of ordinary problem solving. We will then examine a number of case studies of creative advances, from the areas of invention (Edison, the Wright brothers), the arts (painting, sculpture, literature, poetry, and music), and science, to acquire a database to use to test the theories of the creative process developed earlier. The material in this course will go beyond that ordinarily covered in a psychology course - we will read research in art history, musicology, history and philosophy of science, and history of technology, as well as literature from the psychological study of giftedness, personality and mental testing, and cognitive processes. Course requirements will include written comments on each week's assigned readings, and a case study of a creative advance in any area of interest to the student. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3132. Human Memory. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth view of human memory. It focuses on the different approaches to research on human memory, including cognitive approaches, experimental approaches, neuroscientific approaches, and developmental (childhood to old age) approaches. Course topics include basic memory processes, the neuropsychology of memory and amnesia, and applied topics in memory research. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3141. Neurobiology and Evolution of Social Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will present social behavior from an evolutionary and neurobiological perspective. We will survey the many properties of animal social behavior that are now known to be shared by humans and other primates including aggression, dominance, attachment, grief, sympathy, helpfulness, altruism, friendliness, peacemaking, maternal care. The apparent evolutionary history as well as the descriptive characteristics of each social tendency will be studied using data from both field observations and laboratory experiments as available. In those cases where data are available, the course will also present what is known about the neural mechanisms that govern the social behaviors. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2502|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3151. Direct Applications of Behavioral Principles. 3 Credit Hours.

Direct hands-on experience, in the shaping and maintaining of novel behavior patterns in the laboratory, will be supplemented by related readings and field trips to educational and social-service agencies where behavioral principles are applied. These experiences will introduce students to functional analysis and its underlying principles, and to the graphical techniques that enable the tracking of skill acquisition of individuals, as well as evaluating their problematic behavior. In addition, each student will carry out an individual project by selecting, analyzing, and arranging for improvement in some behavior that impacts his or her own quality of life.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3152. Experimental Psychopathology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course applies learning principles and research to the understanding and treatment of behavior problems. Presentation of each Pavlovian or operant conditioning principle is accompanied by illustrations of major ways in which the principle has or can be applied to the etiology and/or treatment of behavior problems. The remainder of the course is concerned with major treatment techniques and with coverage of specific behavior problems, ranging from phobic behavior to chronic psychotic behavior. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3161. Research Methods in Perception. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to sensation and perception research techniques. Using a hands-on approach, students will learn basic techniques for evaluating what humans see and feel, including some of the methods used in industries for product evaluation. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2104|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3162. Visual Recognition. 3 Credit Hours.

Humans effortlessly recognize many different types of things. Current research in this area suggests that there are three fundamental types of visual recognition. In a seminar format each type will be discussed in turn. Readings will be primary sources describing the major theories of how humans recognize objects (such as cars, people, and shoes), places (such as rooms, streets, and cities), and events (such as walking, playing baseball, and arguing). NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2104|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3200. Topics: Clinical. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced level topics course; clinical topics vary by instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3221. Clinical Psychology: Research and Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

In this class the student will learn about one subspecialty within psychology, that of clinical psychology. The course will focus on how clinical psychology emerged as a field of mental health research and practice, what clinical psychologists do and the theory behind those activities. Special attention will be paid to psychological assessment and psychotherapy, two of the main activities that clinical psychologists undertake. Students will learn about the purpose of psychological assessment, some examples of the more commonly used psychological assessment instruments, and how psychological assessment guides service provision. Students will also learn about different theoretical orientations in the practice of psychotherapy. Additional topics covered include ethics in this clinical science, contemporary issues in clinical practice (e.g., innovative treatments for mental illness, the impact of managed care, working with special populations), and career opportunities in the field.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3222. Psychoanalytic Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 3223. Child Psychopathology and Treatment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the major psychological, behavioral, and emotional problems experienced in childhood and adolescence. Organized around - but not limited to - the diagnostic framework of the DSM, the course focuses on current views concerning the phenomenology, etiology (causes), and treatment and prevention of these problems. The major theoretical positions are covered, but the major emphasis is on current empirical findings relevant to the various disorders and problems. Covered issues include conduct problems and delinquency, attention deficit problems, depression and suicide, childhood anxiety problems, mental retardation, learning problems, child maltreatment and abuse, and children's adjustment to family problems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3300. Topics: Developmental. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced level topics course; developmental topics vary by instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3301. Phases of Development: Infancy. 3 Credit Hours.

Within this course, students focus on a particular phase of development, infancy, for an entire semester. This phase of development presents unique changes and challenges for the developing person. For the scientist, the phase poses unique theoretical perspectives and special methodological challenges. Up-to-date information and directions for future study, application and research are emphasized.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3303. Psychological Testing: Measuring IQ, Thoughts, Feelings, and Attitudes. 3 Credit Hours.

How do we measure intelligence, thoughts, feelings, and attitudes? This course will provide an overview of psychometric theory, methods, and statistics. Test construction and the psychometric evaluation of tests (e.g., validity, reliability) will be covered in detail. Students also will learn the history of psychometrics, and legal, ethical, and cultural diversity issues related to this topic will be discussed. This course will introduce assessment concepts and methods that will be useful in a wide range of settings, including graduate school and careers in clinical settings, marketing, personnel selection, job performance evaluations, treatment evaluations, forensic applications, and others.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3304. Personality, Social and Emotional Development. 3 Credit Hours.

How do we develop as unique individuals? How do we come to relate to others and ourselves? How do we come to feel the way we do about the people we know and the many important things in our lives? Using contemporary research and theory, these core questions are examined. Among the topics to be studied are the development and significance of early attachment relationships, the development of a sense of self, changing family relations, the progression from external to internal self-control, the emergence of prosocial and anti-social behavior, moral development, the development of romantic relationships, and the nature of changing relationships with peers and loved ones. Students will acquire an understanding of the role of early experiences in development, the nature of emotional vulnerability and personality resilience, and the extent to which some behaviors are continuous or discontinuous over time. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3305. Cognitive and Language Development. 3 Credit Hours.

This class will discuss theory and evidence concerning how children acquire adult competence in thinking and language. Development is covered from infancy to adolescence. We will consider a wide array of domains and processes in cognitive development, including number, space, theory of mind, reasoning, perception, attention, and memory. Educational and applied implications may be touched on, as well as neuroscience approaches.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3306. Neuroscience of Development and Aging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will integrate students' knowledge of behavioral and cognitive relationships between young adult neuroanatomy and behavior that they studied in prerequisite courses (Psychology 2501 (0260) - Foundations of Behavioral Neuroscience or Psychology 2502 (0265) - Foundations of Cognitive Neuroscience) with information about the development and aging of behavior, cognition and neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. The initial emphasis in the course will be on embryonic and fetal development of the central nervous system and emergent behavioral plasticity. Sensory and motor development in the fetus will be examined. Postnatal development of the cerebral cortex and developmental outcomes will be explored in the context of environmental phenomena that can amplify or inhibit the organism's adaptive capacity. Normal aging of the brain will be contrasted to neurodegenerative diseases of old age, and the cognitive and behavioral consequences of both normal and non-normal aging will be presented.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2502|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3307. Theories of Development. 3 Credit Hours.

It has been said, "There is nothing more practical than a good theory." How can theories have practical application? Theories serve as windows to the world of science, allowing us to "see" particular facts" and help us explain things that cannot explain themselves. Theories are the hallmark of science, fundamental to organizing our knowledge and allowing us to interpret and question it. In this course, students examine the role of theories in scientific thinking and research and they explore the components of theories unique to developmental psychology. In addition to learning about specific theories, such as those developed by Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, Kohlberg, Freud, Wilson, Chomsky, Ainsworth, Skinner and Bandura, students begin to appreciate the origins of theories, the relations between them and their consequences for acquiring future knowledge. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3400. Topics: Social Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced level topics course; social psychology topics vary by instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3411. Social Cognition. 3 Credit Hours.

This class provides an overview of social cognition, the study of the cognitive representations and processes that people use to try to make sense of the social world. Topics covered will include social attitudes, the social self, stereotypes, attributions, and social decision-making. Readings, lectures, and discussions will focus on the key research findings, the unique methods, and the implications and applications of social cognition research. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2401|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3412. Psychological Studies of Social Issues. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the causes, consequences, and amelioration of social problems from a social psychological perspective. For instance, unemployment, imprisonment, racial profiling and discrimination, are a few of the topics this course will address. In addition to examining social problems the course will include a search for solutions as illustrated by social visionaries and experimental utopian communities.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2401|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3417. Personnel Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the application of psychological theories and principles to issues in personnel selection. Topics include job analysis, recruitment and selection techniques, selection fairness, utility analysis, affirmative action, training and development, and performance appraisal.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2402|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3418. Human Performance Improvement. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to Human Performance Technology, a rapidly growing field that applies the principles, methods, and empirical generalizations of Behavior Analysis to improving human performance in organizations. Working from a theoretical basis, students will learn how to diagnose performance discrepancies in organizational settings, design and evaluate appropriate behavior-based solutions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2402|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3561. Psychopharmacology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will focus on how the brain works on a chemical level. It examines how behavior and environment can change functions of the brain, and how medications and drugs alter brain function. NOTE: Check class schedule for semesters offered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR NSCI 2122|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3566. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underlying the many diverse forms of learning and memory. The course begins with an overview of the structure and function of neural areas responsible for learning, before progressing to an examination of the different processes involved in the acquisition, consolidation, and forgetting of habits, skills, and cognition. Additional topics may include the relation between pharmacology and learning, the impact of disease or trauma, and the neurobiology of social behavior.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2502|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3600. Advanced Topics in Health Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics course - topic varies by semester and/or by instructor. Topics offered are all specifically related to Health Psychology. NOTE: Check class schedule for topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2601|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR HRPR 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3601. Social Health Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Health psychology is concerned with the promotion and maintenance of health, the prevention of illness, as well as the treatment of illness. This course will focus on how social psychological factors affect one's general health, health behaviors, and well-being. Emphasis will be placed on theoretical analysis of social psychological phenomena as they apply to health psychology (e.g., social support and intimate relationships; stigma, prejudice, and discrimination; issues of race, gender, class; health attitudes and persuasion; and the self).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2601|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR HRPR 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3602. Clinical Neuropsychology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide background on basic functional anatomy of the central nervous system and neuropsychological theories and methods. The primary focus of the course will be the clinical assessment and treatment of neuropsychological disorders, such as aphasia, agnosia, dementia, and others.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3603. Clinical Applications of Health Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Health psychology is a subfield of psychology that applies psychological theories and techniques to health and wellness and the prevention and treatment of illness and disabling conditions. This advanced undergraduate course will provide an introduction to the clinical applications of health psychology using an interdisciplinary model. Readings, review of research, discussions and an interdisciplinary project will focus on integrating knowledge of the biological, behavioral, emotional, social and cognitive influences on health and health behaviors with the goal of understanding psychological approaches to the prevention and treatment of physical problems and enhancing overall wellness.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2601|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR HRPR 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3615. History and Systems of Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

The development of psychology from its origins to present. The conceptual bases of the current major psychological systems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3620. Topics in Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics course - topic varies by semester and/or by instructor. Topics offered are all from the major divisions of psychology; clinical, developmental, social and BBC (Brain, Behavior & Cognition). NOTE: Check class schedule for topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3785. Psychology Internship. 1 to 12 Credit Hour.

Work experience in clinical and industrial settings where psychologists are employed eight hours a week under the guidance of an on-site supervisor. Students meet for seminars, and write a paper under the guidance of a Temple coordinator.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3787. Practicum. 1 to 12 Credit Hour.

Work experience in clinical and industrial settings where psychologists are employed eight hours a week under the guidance of an on-site supervisor. Students meet for seminars, and write a paper under the guidance of a Temple coordinator.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2000 to 2999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3791. Collaborative Research I. 1 to 4 Credit Hour.

Faculty advisor needed for research in a particular area. For projects outside Temple University, approval must be obtained through a faculty member who will handle the liaison with the outside institution and ensure uniformity of requirements.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 3000 to 3999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3891. Collaborative Research II. 1 to 4 Credit Hour.

Faculty advisor needed for research in a particular area. For projects outside Temple University, approval must be obtained through a faculty member who will handle the liaison with the outside institution and ensure uniformity of requirements.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 3000 to 3999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3920. Honors Topics in Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Topic varies by semester and/or by instructor. Check course schedule for topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3961. Honors Psychopharmacology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will focus on how the brain works on a chemical level. It examines how behavior and environment can change functions of the brain, and how medications and drugs alter brain function.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR NSCI 2122|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 3991. Honors Research II. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics arranged by student and instructor.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 2991|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 4182. Independent Study in Cognitive Neuroscience I. 3 Credit Hours.

Students do cognitive neuroscience research in the laboratory.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PSY 4282. Independent Study in Cognitive Neuroscience II. 3 Credit Hours.

Students do cognitive neuroscience research in the laboratory.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 4182|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 4496. Capstone: History of Psychology. 4 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is on the conceptual bases of the major contemporary systems in psychology. The historical perspective allows students to understand the relationship between different fields in psychology. It encourages students to organize their knowledge, interpret, and question it. Students will work on projects related to their particular interests in psychology, especially as related to career goals. Projects will tie together the historical antecedents of the field of interest and its current status and practice. NOTE: This course is limited to psychology majors in their senior year.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 4596. Capstone: Fields of Psychology. 4 Credit Hours.

The focus of the course is a topic within one of the fields represented by the Programs in the Psychology Department (Developmental, Clinical, Social, Cognitive, Evolutionary/Comparative, Learning and Behavior Analysis, Neuropsychology, Sensation and Perception). The course might deal with the history of the field, a signature topic in the field, or a topic of considerable contemporary importance. Students selecting this capstone should be planning a career in the field represented. The course will emphasize integration of knowledge in the field and professional preparation. NOTE: This course is limited to psychology majors in their senior year. Check class schedules for semesters offered.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 4696. Capstone in Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this capstone is a topic important to many fields in psychology. Different topics will be covered in different semesters. The course will allow students to see the linkages between concepts and theories from very different fields and to see how psychology can be applied to problems in many spheres of life. The emphasis on synthesis and application makes this capstone particularly useful for students planning graduate work in psychology and those unsure of the direction they would like to take in psychology. NOTE: This course is limited to psychology majors in their senior year.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
PSY 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2196|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PSY 4791. Collaborative Research III. 1 to 4 Credit Hour.

Faculty advisor needed for research in a particular area. For projects outside Temple University, approval must be obtained through a faculty member who will handle the liaison with the outside institution and ensure uniformity of requirements.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 3000 to 3999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 4796. Capstone: Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The focus of this capstone is research and the student works with an individual faculty member on a research project. Permission of a faculty sponsor is required. This capstone is best suited for students with well developed interests who plan to go on to graduate or professional school. NOTE: This course is limited to psychology majors in their senior year with a GPA of 3.5 in psychology and 3.2 overall.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 4891. Collaborative Research IV. 1 to 4 Credit Hour.

Faculty advisor needed for research in a particular area. For projects outside Temple University, approval must be obtained through a faculty member who will handle the liaison with the outside institution and ensure uniformity of requirements.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(PSY 3000 to 3999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1004|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 2168|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (PSY 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1071|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

PSY 4991. Honors Research III. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics arranged by student and instructor.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PSY 4996. Honors Capstone. 4 Credit Hours.

This capstone is the final class of a four semester honors program in psychology. At this point students have designed a research project and collected and analyzed their data. Here the students write their research in APA style and prepare to submit these manuscripts for publication. Each student participates in a poster session attended by the psychology faculty and other invited guests. NOTE: This course is limited to psychology majors in their senior year who have completed the first three semesters of the psychology honors program.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PSY 4998. Honors Research Problems. 4 Credit Hours.

Topics arranged by student and instructor.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.