Greek and Roman Classics (GRC)

Courses

GRC 0803. The Art of Sacred Space. 3 Credit Hours.

Where do people go to communicate with the divine? Explore with us where and how people of the many different cultures of the Greco-Roman world communicated with their gods. Why are graves and groves considered sacred space? When is a painting or sculpture considered sacred? Whom do the gods allow to enter a sacred building? Can a song be a prayer or a curse? How can dance sway the gods? Why do gods love processions and the smell of burning animals? The journey through sacred space in Greco-Roman antiquity will engage your senses and your intellect, and will reveal a mindset both ancient and new. NOTE: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for GRC 0803 if they have successfully completed GRC 0903, REL 0803 or ARTH 0803.

Course Attributes: GA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 0804. Race in the Ancient Mediterranean. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about ancient thinking about race and ethnicity and how ancient thinking remains current and influential today. Investigate how categories of race and ethnicity are presented in the literature and artistic works of Greece and Rome. Our case studies will pay particular attention to such concepts as: notions of racial formation and racial origins; ancient theories of ethnic superiority; and linguistic, religious and cultural differentiation as a basis for ethnic differentiation. We will also examine ancient racism through the prism of a variety of social processes in antiquity: slavery, trade and colonization, migrations, imperialism, assimilation, native revolts, and genocide. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for GRC 0804 if they have successfully completed GRC 0904.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 0811. Greek Theater & Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Through close readings of surviving texts, through viewings of modern productions of ancient theatrical works, and through your own recreations of Greek performative media, we will examine and experience ancient Greek drama both as a product of its own historical period and as a living art form. We will ask fundamental questions about the nature and purpose of theater in the ancient world: Is this art just entertainment or does it engage and comment on the problems of Athens? How and why did this society invent theater in the Western world? We will also investigate the relationship of Greek drama to the modern world: Why do new versions of plays about Oedipus, Antigone and Dionysus keep popping up in places as diverse as New York, Utah, South Africa and China? How can ancient drama be staged now in a way that is both responsible to the surviving texts and stimulating to contemporary audiences? NOTE: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for GRC 0811 if they have successfully completed GRC 0911.

Course Attributes: GA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 0829. Ancient War Games: Sport and Spectacle in Greece and Rome. 3 Credit Hours.

Every four years the world stages athletic contests that are based on the practices of ancient Greece. Every year the NFL assigns a Roman numeral to the Super Bowl and suggests its players are modern gladiators. Greek athletic games and Roman gladiatorial battles developed from the practice of warfare in their societies. American sports may be viewed as the descendants of these ancient "war games." This class examines the similarities and differences in such sports and the societies that enjoyed (and enjoy) them. The Greek games replaced the blood of the battlefield with dramatic displays of military physicality, while the Roman games replicated this blood with armed combat before crowds of thousands. We begin by examining the origins, events, architecture, and rules of the Greek games, from Homer's funeral contests to the development of the circuit of athletic festivals. Next we look at the "re-foundation" of the modern Olympics and its romanticized mythology in several important films. Then we turn to Roman blood-sports (animal fights, gladiatorial contests and spectacular criminal punishments) and chariot-racing, considering also the filters of modern Hollywood. We end with the rise of modern spectator sports, especially football.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 0903. Honors Art of Sacred Space. 3 Credit Hours.

Where do people go to communicate with the divine? Explore with us where and how people of the many different cultures of the Greco-Roman world communicated with their gods. Why are graves and groves considered sacred space? When is a painting or sculpture considered sacred? Whom do the gods allow to enter a sacred building? Can a song be a prayer or a curse? How can dance sway the gods? Why do gods love processions and the smell of burning animals? The journey through sacred space in Greco-Roman antiquity will engage your senses and your intellect, and will reveal a mindset both ancient and new. NOTE: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for GRC 0903 if they have successfully completed GRC 0803, REL 0803 or ARTH 0803.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GA, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 0904. Honors Race in the Ancient Mediterranean. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about ancient thinking about race and ethnicity and how ancient thinking remains current and influential today. Investigate how categories of race and ethnicity are presented in the literature and artistic works of Greece and Rome. Our case studies will pay particular attention to such concepts as: notions of racial formation and racial origins; ancient theories of ethnic superiority; and linguistic, religious and cultural differentiation as a basis for ethnic differentiation. We will also examine ancient racism through the prism of a variety of social processes in antiquity: slavery, trade and colonization, migrations, imperialism, assimilation, native revolts, and genocide. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for GRC 0904 if they have successfully completed GRC 0804.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GD, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 0911. Honors Greek Theater & Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Through close readings of surviving texts, through viewings of modern productions of ancient theatrical works, and through your own recreations of Greek performative media, we will examine and experience ancient Greek drama both as a product of its own historical period and as a living art form. We will ask fundamental questions about the nature and purpose of theater in the ancient world: is this art just entertainment or does it engage and comment on the problems of Athens? How and why did this society invent theater in the Western world? We will also investigate the relationship of Greek drama to the modern world: why do new versions of plays about Oedipus, Antigone and Dionysus keep popping up in places as diverse as New York, Utah, South Africa and China? How can ancient drama be staged now in a way that is both responsible to the surviving texts and stimulating to contemporary audiences? NOTE: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for GRC 0911 if they have successfully completed GRC 0811.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GA, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 0929. Honors Ancient War Games: Sport and Spectacle in Greece and Rome. 3 Credit Hours.

Every four years the world stages athletic contests that are based on the practices of ancient Greece. Every year the NFL assigns a Roman numeral to the Super Bowl and suggests its players are modern gladiators. Greek athletic games and Roman gladiatorial battles developed from the practice of warfare in their societies. American sports may be viewed as the descendants of these ancient "war games." This class examines the similarities and differences in such sports and the societies that enjoyed (and enjoy) them. The Greek games replaced the blood of the battlefield with dramatic displays of military physicality, while the Roman games replicated this blood with armed combat before crowds of thousands. We begin by examining the origins, events, architecture, and rules of the Greek games, from Homer's funeral contests to the development of the circuit of athletic festivals. Next we look at the "re-foundation" of the modern Olympics and its romanticized mythology in several important films. Then we turn to Roman blood-sports (animal fights, gladiatorial contests and spectacular criminal punishments) and chariot-racing, considering also the filters of modern Hollywood. We end with the rise of modern spectator sports, especially football.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GB, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 1003. Greek Drama and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to ancient Greek drama and the society that produced it. The course examines in detail tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and comedies of Aristophanes. Among the topics considered are: tragic and comic festivals, the nature of Greek theaters, theatrical production techniques, religion and drama, women and tragedy, tragic and comic heroism, democracy and drama, myth and tragedy, and the legacy of Greek tragedy in the modern world. NOTE: (1) Attendance at theatrical productions encouraged or required. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 1004. Introduction to the Ancient City. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the people, urban forms, and urban institutions of the ancient Greco-Roman world. Readings from translations of primary materials and from modern authors will survey such cities as Corinth, Pergamon, and Ostia. Audio-visual enhancement. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 1068. Israel in the Middle East. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of Israel's history and geography, followed by consideration on major issues facing the nation and its neighbors: water supply, political structure, society, culture, economy, and the peace process. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 1903. Honors Greek Drama and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to ancient Greek drama and the society that produced it. The course examines in detail tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and comedies of Aristophanes. Among the topics considered are: tragic and comic festivals, the nature of Greek theaters, theatrical production techniques, religion and drama, women and tragedy, tragic and comic heroism, democracy and drama, myth and tragedy, and the legacy of Greek tragedy in the modern world. NOTE: (1) Attendance at theatrical productions encouraged or required. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: AR, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2000. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics will be arranged each semester; please consult with the instructor for more information.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GRC 2001. Slavery in Antiquity. 3 Credit Hours.

Ancient Greece and Rome did not simply permit slave ownership but were critically dependent upon slave labor. To some scholars, they were "slave societies," comparable to the Caribbean, Brazil and the United States before the Civil War. This course explores the ancients' use of slaves and the effects of this practice on Greek and Roman literature and philosophy, and then considers the influence of ancient practices on later periods.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2002. Gender in Classical Antiquity. 3 Credit Hours.

What can we learn about the lives of ancient Greek and Roman women from ancient literature - literature written primarily by men? Can we piece together the everyday lives of Greek or Roman women of any social class? Even if we believe in the equality of the sexes, would a word like "equality" have had any meaning to the ancients? In this class, we will find answers to these questions by reading Greek and Latin sources in translation as well as the works of modern Classicists. While focusing on women's lives, we will gain a greater understanding of what was expected of both genders in the ancient world.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2003. Race: Ancient and Modern. 3 Credit Hours.

Comparative case studies on race and ethnicity in the ancient and modern worlds, concentrating on events and themes in the modern world that originate in or share key traits with racial/ethnic relations in Greek and Roman antiquity. These include: notions of racial formation and racial origins; theories of ethnic superiority; the relationship among slavery, trade and colonization, imperialism, genocide, assimilation, and native revolts; racial migration; linguistic and cultural differentiation; Indo-European language and culture; and ethnic differentiation in modern Mediterranean cultures. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a university Core Studies in Race and International Studies (RG) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2004. The City of Rome. 3 Credit Hours.

"The City of Rome" examines the features and development of the physical world of the ancient Romans. Beginning with the earliest evidence for material culture in and around the city of Rome, we examine how both the Roman city and the material objects associated with Roman life (including art, architecture, and technology), developed and changed as Roman influence expanded, Roman culture came into contact with neighboring cultures, and Roman rule came to dominate the Mediterranean basin.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2011. Classical Greek and Roman Mythology. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of the major myths of Greek and Roman antiquity including appropriate gods, heroes and heroines, and the stories told about them. The course examines the nature and social function of mythology, studying a number of different ancient and modern theories that attempt to account for this seemingly universal phenomenon. Also considered is the legacy of classical mythology in modern art and literature, including popular culture. This course provides students with the tools to understand other myths, both ancient and modern. Students encounter ancient myths through a variety of primary sources. NOTE: Formerly known as GRC 3001 Classical Greek and Roman Mythology. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GRC 3001 or GRC 2011.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2101. The Greeks. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores who the ancient Greeks were, what they did, how they lived and what they believed. It focuses on both what we owe to the Greeks and how radically different they are from us. This is not a history of ancient Greece, but a journey through a series of connected units that explore different facets of ancient Greek civilization, from the Trojan War, to the ancient Olympics, to slavery, the family life and other topics. These topics are pursued in an interdisciplinary manner so that students examine evidence from Greek art, literature, history and philosophy. This course can serve the needs of students who seek a broad background in ancient Greek civilization and those who seek an introduction to this subject before pursuing more advanced work in Classics. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Ancient Greek Civilization."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2102. The Romans. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores in an interdisciplinary manner who the ancient Romans were, what they did, how they lived and what they believed. Students will read some of the great works of Roman historians, poets and novelists, as well as study the physical and artistic culture of Rome, with a view to understanding the Romans' beliefs about themselves and their world. Each week, one class will be devoted to learning about larger issues of Roman daily life (education, spectacles), history (civil wars, the Augustan world) and people (men, women, slaves, Christians), and one class to learning about the authors who wrote on these subjects or during these historical periods. This course can serve the needs of students who seek a broad background in ancient Roman civilization and those who seek an introduction to this subject before pursuing more advanced work in Classics. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Ancient Roman Civilization."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2902. Honors Gender in Classical Antiquity. 3 Credit Hours.

What can we learn about the lives of ancient Greek and Roman women from ancient literature - literature written primarily by men? Can we piece together the everyday lives of Greek or Roman women of any social class? Even if we believe in the equality of the sexes, would a word like "equality" have had any meaning to the ancients? In this class, we will find answers to these questions by reading Greek and Latin sources in translation as well as the works of modern Classicists. While focusing on women's lives, we will gain a greater understanding of what was expected of both genders in the ancient world.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2903. Honors Race in Greece and Rome. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of GRC 2003 (R112). Comparative case studies on race and ethnicity in the ancient and modern worlds, concentrating on events and themes in the modern world that originate in or share key traits with racial/ethnic relations in Greek and Roman antiquity. These include: notions of racial formation and racial origins; theories of ethnic superiority; the relationship among slavery, trade and colonization, imperialism, genocide, assimilation, and native revolts; racial migration; linguistic and cultural differentiation; Indo-European language and culture; and ethnic differentiation in modern Mediterranean cultures. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a university Core Studies in Race and International Studies (RG) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, RG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 2911. Honors Classical Greek and Roman Mythology. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of the major myths of Greek and Roman antiquity including appropriate gods, heroes and heroines, and the stories told about them. The course examines the nature and social function of mythology, studying a number of different ancient and modern theories that attempt to account for this seemingly universal phenomenon. Also considered is the legacy of classical mythology in modern art and literature, including popular culture. This course provides students with the tools to understand other myths, both ancient and modern. Students encounter ancient myths through a variety of primary sources. NOTE: Formerly known as GRC 3901 Honors Classical Greek and Roman Mythology. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GRC 3901 or GRC 2911.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 3000. Topics in Classical Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics from classical antiquity which are of general and current interest based on reading Greek and Roman texts in translation. Lectures, audiovisual presentations, and large and small group work used to explore the significance of the texts.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GRC 3002. Ancient City: Augustan Rome. 3 Credit Hours.

As first princeps (emperor of Rome) Augustus claimed to re-establish republican Rome after years of external and internal wars. We will study the city that emerged from the efforts of architects, engineers and artists of all kinds enlisted to assist Augustus in the new founding of Rome.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 3003. Ancient City: Byzantium. 3 Credit Hours.

The Greek colony Byzantium found new life as capital of the Christianized Roman Empire from the 4th century to the 15th century CE. This course explores the art, architecture, literature, military, political and social history of Constantinople from its re-founding by Constantine I through the early centuries of its eminence.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 3096. Romans and Their Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine some of the great works of Roman historians, poets and novelists with a view to understanding the Romans' beliefs about themselves and their world. The class will investigate the origins of the Roman people through the eyes of the historian Livy as well as the great epicist Virgil, who standardized the foundation myth of the Romans in his Aeneid. Comparing the works of Cicero and Catullus will introduce life during the last days of the Republic, while the poetry and real-life tragic end of the brilliant career of the Augustan poet Ovid will raise questions about the glory of the dawning Empire. Suetonius' gossipy record of the lives of the first twelve emperors, and Petronius' zany "novel," the Satyricon, are fascinating guides to Rome in the 1st century.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 3196. Classical Greek and Roman Mythology. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of the major myths survey of Greek and Roman antiquity including appropriate gods, heroes and heroines, and the stories told about them. The course examines the nature and social function of mythology, studying a number of different ancient and modern theories that attempt to account for this seemingly universal phenomenon. Also considered is the legacy of classical mythology in modern art and literature, including popular culture. This course provides students with the tools to understand other myths, both ancient and modern. Students encounter ancient myths through a variety of primary sources.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 3296. Comparative Mythology. 3 Credit Hours.

Materials from a variety of cultures will show how human beings deal with such ideas as the creation of the universe and mankind, the definition of the hero, order in the cosmos, and eschatology. Greek and Roman myths will serve throughout as the basis for comparison with a varying selection of myths from other cultures. NOTE: Offered in even number spring semesters.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 3311. Ancient Greek Historians. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will survey Greek history from 800 BCE until the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE) and the works of two of the most important Greek historians: Herodotus and Thucydides. A major component of the course will be an examination of the historiographical methods of these writers, but attention also will be paid to the other types of sources that are available.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 3312. Ancient Roman Historians. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will survey Roman history from the founding of Rome in the 8th century BCE through the fall of Rome in the 5th century CE. A major component of the course will be an examination of the texts and historiographical methods of important Roman historians such as Livy, Sallust and Tacitus, but attention also will be paid to other types of sources.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 3396. Classical Epic. 3 Credit Hours.

This course traces the development of a genre from its definitive manifestation in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, to the uses and abuses of epic by Apollonius Rhodius (The Voyage of Argo) and Vergil (Aeneid). Through close reading of these poems and some other examples of epic literature we will consider various topics, including the relationship between myth and history, the role of the hero and the status of women, oral vs. literary epic, and cultural context and broader cultural function of epic in the society in which it is produced and consumed. We will seek to define epic, and to develop an understanding of the constituent facets of the genre.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GRC 0800 to 3400| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GRC 3496. Writing Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics from classical antiquity which are of general and current interest based on reading Greek and Roman texts in translation. Lectures, audiovisual presentations, and large and small group work used to explore the significance of the texts.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GRC 3596. Ancient City: Periclean Athens. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will survey Athens in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, examining the accomplishments and failures of one of the few truly participatory democracies the world has known. In addition to studying the history of the city as it gained and lost an empire, we will explore its arts (including theater, philosophy, and architecture) and the everyday life of its denizens.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
GRC 0800 to 3400| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GRC 3696. Ancient City: Hellenistic Alexandria. 3 Credit Hours.

At the death of Alexander his general Ptolemy moved the capital of Egypt from Memphis to Alexandria, which soon became renowned for buildings such as the Library and the Lighthouse, and as a center for commerce and arts. We will survey the art, literature, philosophy, social and economic foundations, and urban problems of this largest of Greek cities.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GRC 0800 to 3400| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GRC 3796. Ancient City: Augustan Rome. 3 Credit Hours.

Upon achieving mastery of the Roman world through key military victories, Octavian ostensibly returned control of the restored Republic to the Senate and People of Rome in exchange for the quasi-religious, honorific title Augustus (worthy of honor). But he retained command of Rome's armies and transformed himself into the first true emperor of a vast territory that encompassed the entire Mediterranean basin. To legitimate and raise popular support for his rule, he instituted a massive building and beautification program in Rome, promoted the literary arts, and instituted legal and religious reforms, all of which ushered in Rome's Golden Age. In this course we will study--and interact with--the influential history, physical structures, ideals, social institutions and arts of Augustan Rome.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GRC 0800 to 3400| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GRC 3896. Ancient City: Byzantium. 3 Credit Hours.

The Greek colony Byzantium found new life as capital of the Christianized Roman Empire from the 4th century to the 15th century CE. This course explores the art, architecture, literature, military, political and social history of Constantinople from its re-founding by Constantine I through the early centuries of its eminence.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GRC 0800 to 3400| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GRC 3897. Ancient City: Jerusalem. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will investigate the history, society, culture, topography and art of this immensely important city during one of its most historically significant periods, focusing mainly on the period after Jerusalem fell into the ambit of the Roman Empire (63 BCE) to its destruction by the armies of Titus (70 CE). It will also consider the development of the relationship between Jerusalem and Rome, and the important role played by ethnic, cultural, and religious differences in the ultimate failure of Romano-Judaean relations, with a view to understanding how overcoming such differences today is necessary to create a successful and functioning global community. Source material will include the historical writings, contemporary non-literary sources such as coins and inscriptions, and articles or videos by modern historians and archaeologists on relevant topics.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GRC 0800 to 3400| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GRC 3900. Honors Topics in Classical Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics from classical antiquity which are of general and current interest based on reading Greek and Roman texts in translation. Lectures, audiovisual presentations, and large and small group work used to explore the significance of the texts.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GRC 3996. Honors Comparative Mythology. 3 Credit Hours.

Materials from a variety of cultures will show how human beings deal with such ideas as the creation of the universe and mankind, the definition of the hero, order in the cosmos, and eschatology. Greek and Roman myths will serve throughout as the basis for comparison with a varying selection of myths from other cultures.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GRC 4000. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected readings in Greek/Latin literature.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GRC 4082. Independent Study. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Intensive study under individual guidance in a specific area suggested by the student and approved by the department advisor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GRC 4182. Independent Study. 3 Credit Hours.

Intensive study under individual guidance in a specific area suggested by the student and approved by the department advisor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GRC 4282. Independent Study. 4 Credit Hours.

Intensive study under individual guidance in a specific area suggested by the student and approved by the department advisor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.