Economics (ECON)

Courses

ECON 0858. The American Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

Should the federal government more forcefully engage health care issues, or are its current obligations a hidden time bomb facing the federal budget? Should we be concerned about the outsourcing of U.S. jobs? Is the minimum wage too low, or will increases in the minimum simply lead to greater unemployment? Students will engage these and other pressing issues, write position papers advocating specific actions that governments or firms should take, and debate these recommendations. While economic theory is not the centerpiece of this course, students will learn enough economic theory to be able to discuss policy in an informed manner. They will also be introduced to important sources of "economic" information, from government web sites to major publications. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for ECON 0858 if they have successfully completed SOC 0858.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ECON 1001. Introduction to the Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

Discussion of what economics is all about. Provides an overview of how a market economy operates, what it does well, what it may not do so well, and what could be done instead. The concepts of economic analysis are developed and applied to discussing some of the current economic problems the world is facing. NOTE: (1) This course is designated for students who are not business or economics majors. Students planning to take 2000, 3000 or 4000 level economics courses may have to take Economics 1101 or 1102 in addition to Economics 1001. Look at prerequisites for a particular course to see if 1101 or 1102 is specified. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ECON 1004. Economic Principles for Education Majors. 3 Credit Hours.

A one-semester introductory course in both macro- and microeconomics for education majors. Topics include: scarcity, the market system, supply and demand, competition, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, international economics, and government policy. Methods for teaching economics to primary and secondary students will also be covered. NOTE: Not to be taken for credit by Fox School of Business and Management students.

College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: Education

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ECON 1101. Macroeconomic Principles. 3 Credit Hours.

An introductory course in macroeconomics. Topics include business cycles, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policy, international economics, and economic growth. NOTE: (1) Economics 1101 and 1102 may be taken in any order. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 0702|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC4 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC5 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR STA1 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR STA2 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR ST1A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR ST2A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 1102. Microeconomic Principles. 3 Credit Hours.

An introductory course in microeconomics. Topics include the market system, supply and demand, cost, competition, monopoly, oligopoly, factor markets, and public goods. NOTE: (1) Economics 1101 and 1102 may be taken in any order. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 0702|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC4 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC5 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR STA1 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR STA2 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR ST1A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR ST2A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 1103. Global Economics Issues. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines the global context in which the United States economy functions. Basic economic concepts are used to study economic growth, persistence of underdevelopment, differing economic systems, and the interdependence of nations in the world economy. Special topics that may be investigated include the debt crisis, protectionism, the role of multinational corporations, and the gap between rich and poor nations. NOTE: (1) May not be taken by FSBM students as a substitute for Economics 1101, 1102, 1901, or 1902. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ECON 1901. Honors Macroeconomic Principles. 3 Credit Hours.

An introductory course in macroeconomics. Topics include business cycles, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policy, international economics, and economic growth. NOTE: (1) 1901 is the honors course. It usually requires additional reading and writing assignments. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ECON 1902. Honors Microeconomic Principles. 3 Credit Hours.

An introductory course in microeconomics. Topics include the market system, supply and demand, cost, competition, monopoly, oligopoly, factor markets, and public goods. NOTE: (1) 1902 is the honors course. It usually requires additional reading and writing assignments. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ECON 2514. Social and Economic Transformation in Russia. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will study the transformation of Russian society and the Russian economy, focusing on the 20th and 21st centuries. We will closely examine Russian economic transitions from a market to a planned economy (in the 1920s and 1930s) and from a planned economy back to a market economy (after 1991), as well as analyses of the Russian economy and society in periods of great stress (civil war, collectivization, famine, terror, war and occupation, arms race). We will also read memoirs and works of prose fiction and watch films in order to learn about the consequences of economic decisions on the lives of actual Russian citizens. The course will culminate with interviews with Russian businessmen visiting the United States.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ECON 3408. Economics for Life. 3 Credit Hours.

Increasingly, people are expected to make their own personal financial choices. Economics, which is often defined as the study of choice, provides a structure for making these decisions. This course is designed to help a student, regardless of his or her major, to understand what options are available with respect to a given financial choice and how to go about deciding which one is best in terms of that student's preferences. Among the financial choices that may be discussed are: whether to rent or buy a house or apartment, whether to accept a current job offer or wait for a better one, and when and how much to begin setting aside for retirement.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 3501. Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

An intermediate treatment of microeconomic theory and applications. Topics include consumer behavior, production, costs, perfect competition, imperfect competition, factor markets, public goods, and market failure. NOTE: This theory course is designed for economics, finance, and actuarial science majors with analytic skills. It is required for all Economics majors. It is not recommended for non-majors who earned less than B- in Economics 1101 or 1102.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3502. Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

An intermediate treatment of macroeconomic theory and policy. Following a discussion of the important macroeconomic sectors, static and dynamic macroeconomic models are developed. Unemployment, inflation, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policy, economic growth, and the balance of payments are then analyzed using these models. NOTE: This theory course is designed for economics, finance, and actuarial science majors with analytic skills. It is required for all Economics majors. Not recommended for non-majors who earned less than B- in Economics 1101 or 1102.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3503. Introduction to Econometrics. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the theory and practice of econometrics. Topics include a review of basic statistics, simple regression, multiple regression, dummy variables, autocorrelation, heteroscedasticity, and model specification. Applications in economics are stressed. Problem sets, computer estimation of economic relationships, and a data analysis paper are required. This course is strongly recommended for Economics majors. NOTE: Not recommended for non-majors who earned less than B- in Economics 1101 or 1102.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2903|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 3031|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3504. Mathematical Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Elements of set theory, calculus, and matrix algebra are presented and used to analyze mathematical models from economic theory, econometrics, management science, and statistics. This course is strongly recommended for Economics majors.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (MATH 1031|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1041|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1941|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1038|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3506. Energy, Ecology, and Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

After surveying the elements of energy and ecology, and reviewing the basics of economics, this course investigates the interaction of the three. Each of the major nonrenewable and renewable energy sources is examined in light of its "eco-feasibility." The potential of energy conservation is examined, and the need for energy/environmental/economic (3-E) policy is debated. Some speculations about future 3-E scenarios are offered, as the U.S. and the rest of the world face their energy, ecological, and economic problems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3507. Health Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Problems of efficient production and the equitable distribution of health-related services. Policy-oriented material with comprehensive review of standard microeconomic theory in the context of supplier-dependent consumer decisions, third-party payers, and not-for-profit producers.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 3511. The Economics and Management of Privatization. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the new trend of shifting delivery of services and responsibilities from governments and non-profit organizations to the private sector. It includes North American and international experiences. This course provides public economics theoretical models, as well as description and evaluation of experiences in the fields of justice, transportation, education, health, and welfare. The course will further suggest models of the privatization process.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 3512. Public Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of the economics of the public sector. Topics include the theories of public goods and optimal (efficient and equitable) taxation, public expenditures, revenues, and tax incidence.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3513. Economics of State and Local Governments. 3 Credit Hours.

Economic problems confronting state and local governments. Topics include intergovernmental relationships, the response of state and local governments to problems of urbanization, and the impact of state and local taxes and expenditures.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3521. Economics of Risk and Uncertainty. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the issues of risk and uncertainty that have become a standard part of microeconomic analysis and applied economics: expected utility theory and its criticism, applications of expected utility theory and economic and game-theoretic equilibrium analysis to insurance economics, incentives (moral hazard and adverse selection), and economic organization (theory of contracts).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (STAT 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STT2 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1022|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1041|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1941|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1038|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (STAT 2102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2903|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 3031|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3522. Economic Theory of Networks. 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents an overview of networks with emphasis on social networks, online and offline. The student will learn the basic mathematical techniques for representing networks as well as techniques from game theory and economics for the analysis of network structure and evolution.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 3531. History of Economic Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

The development of economic analysis from the pre-classical period to the neo-classical tradition that dominates contemporary mainstream economic thinking; emphasis on the work of Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, the Marginalists, Marx, and Marshall.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3532. Economic History of the United States. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of the forces that influence economic development and growth. Topics include alternative theories of development, empirical studies of the development process, and the role of non-economic factors in helping or hindering economic progress. NOTE: Course taught in Temple University Japan.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3535. Public Control of Business: Antitrust. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of U.S. antitrust policy as applied to monopoly, mergers, price discrimination, tying agreements, and patents. Includes analysis of antitrust issues in law, medicine, and professional sports. The relative merits of government ownership, regulation, and antitrust policy are examined.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3536. Economics of American Industry. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines the competitive and monopolistic features of American industry and their effect on product prices and quality, the distribution of income, the rate of technological progress, and, among others, the efficient utilization of scarce resources, and economic rationale for the antitrust laws.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3537. Comparative Economic Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

The course highlights how two economic models - market and government control - are combined and applied in different societies. Specifics are studied for the following cases: (1) the U.S., with traditionally lowest government involvement in economic activity; (2) West European countries, with both market and socialist oriented institutions; (3) the former Soviet Union and Central European countries, which rejected complete government control and are being transformed into market economies; and (4) China, where the government keeps control of big business and allows economic freedom for small business and agriculture. An important consideration is how various systems promote economic growth and withstand crises.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3538. Managerial Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

The application of microeconomic principles to business planning and decision-making. Topics include demand estimation, cost analysis, and production planning.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3539. Economics of Socialist Countries. 3 Credit Hours.

The analysis of failures of a government-controlled economic model and transition to a market economy, with major attention paid to the creation of new economic institutions in a relatively short time under immense pressure. Topics include transition policies, theory of privatization and the ugly forms of implementation, capital formation, the new enterprise, institutional change, markets and corruption, property rights and the rule of law, varying attitudes towards democracy, and the social safety net.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently.

ECON 3541. The Economics of Sports. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to a variety of economic disciplines through the prism of professional and amateur sports. Students confront industrial organization and anti-trust issues involving sports leagues, public finance issues involving the relationship between cities and franchises, and labor issues involving reward systems, unions and discrimination. The course concludes with an analysis of collegiate sports and the NCAA.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3542. Economics of the Arts and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the microeconomic issues faced by the cultural sector of society. The fine arts, performing arts, book publishing, and film industries receive specific attention. At the end of the course, the successful student will have acquired a sense of how art and culture fit in the economy, what are the basic economic issues faced by artists, and how the perceived value of art and culture affects public support for the arts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 3543. Law and Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the economic analysis of law. The course employs microeconomics to develop a behavioral model of response to legal rules. Topics covered include the common laws of property, contract, and tort as well as an extended discussion of intellectual property.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 3544. Computer-Based Modeling. 3 Credit Hours.

Students access a variety of economic models established on the University computing system. The models are used in problem-solving to reinforce economic concepts and to gain experience in the conduct of applied economics. Evaluating the consequences of government policies using cost/benefit analysis is emphasized. NOTE: No prior experience with computers or computer programming is required.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (MATH 1031|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1041|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1941|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1038|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3545. Economics of Labor Markets. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines the nature of labor market equilibrium. Topics include fertility and migration, the allocation of time and occupational choice, human capital, and discrimination.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3546. Women in the Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

A course in labor economics with specific application to women in paid and unpaid employment. The course explores alternative economic theories of the labor market and economic approaches to discrimination as well as historic changes in the nature of unpaid and paid work. These theories are then applied to the economic situation of women in the U.S. and other societies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3547. Economics of Development and Growth. 3 Credit Hours.

The course concentrates on issues of growth and development for a variety of world economies. The issues covered include topics such as scarcity of resources, interaction between market and government control, role of technology and human capital, and inequality and poverty. Specific tools include the measurement of economic growth and standards of living, conduct of macroeconomic policy, models of international trade, and instruments of global capital markets.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3548. Behavioral Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This upper-level course, provides a solid foundation for understanding the new field of Behavioral Economics. It takes rational choice theory as a point of departure and then presents the findings of Behavioral Economics, explaining how these findings either support or call for a revision to the rational expectations model. The course uses multidisciplinary findings from psychology, experimental economics, neuroscience and evolutionary psychology to enhance our understanding of how humans make economics decisions and how incentives influence those decisions. Not only CLA economic majors, but also other CLA and FSBM students should be interested in this course, as it deals with the basis of all human decision-making. Students who have earned credit in ECON 3696 will not receive additional credits.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3563. International Trade. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the basic theories of international trade, commercial policy, and factor movements. Topics may include the relation between trade and economic growth, global aspects of U.S. trade policy, international trade agreements, and protectionism. NOTE: Not recommended for non-majors who earned less than B- in Economics 1101 or 1102.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3564. International Monetary Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

The analysis of the balance of payments and foreign currency markets. Topics include the international payments system, foreign investment and debt, and exchange rate regimes. NOTE: Not recommended for non-majors who earned less than B- in Economics 1101 or 1102.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3571. Money and Banking. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the role of the banking and monetary institutions within a modern developed economy, with an emphasis on the United States. (1) We will analyze financial intermediation and the role of banks in the economic system, place them in historical context, and discuss the economic rationale behind banking regulation. (2) We will study the role of money and the Federal Reserve in the U.S. economic and financial system. (3) We will discuss the instruments and goals of monetary policy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3572. Owl Fund Seminar I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the in-depth training in applied business economics to support the William C. Dunkelberg Owl Fund as part of the economics team. Students provide business conditions forecasts by sector incorporating data from FRED, Bloomberg, etc. including development of visually effective charts. In addition, the economics team is responsible for determining over versus under weighting of sectors based on their macro analysis. Permission of the instructor is required for admission.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3580. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics in current developments in the field of economics.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3581. Co-op Experience in Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Students undertake a research project that integrates their current work experience with their classroom experience at Temple University. The results are reported in a 10 to 20-page paper prepared under the supervision of a faculty member. NOTE: Fox students should contact the Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD; www.sbm.temple.edu/cspd/; 215-204-2371) for permission to enroll in this course. All other students should contact the Economics Department Coordinator (Ritter Annex 873; 215-204-8880).

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3582. Independent Study. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Directed reading and/or writing assignments under supervision of a faculty member.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ECON 3596. Energy, Ecology, and Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

After surveying the elements of energy and ecology, and reviewing the basics of economics, this course investigates the interaction of the three. Each of the major nonrenewable and renewable energy sources is examined in light of its "eco-feasibility." The potential of energy conservation is examined, and the need for energy/environmental/economic (3-E) policy is debated. Some speculations about future 3-E scenarios are offered, as the U.S. and the rest of the world face their energy, ecological, and economic problems.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3597. Health Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Problems of efficient production and the equitable distribution of health-related services. Policy-oriented material with comprehensive review of standard microeconomic theory in the context of supplier-dependent consumer decisions, third-party payers, and not-for-profit producers.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 3598. Economics Writing Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This course fulfills the advanced writing requirement for economics majors in the College of Liberal Arts and the Fox School of Business and Management. Students are expected to demonstrate through a series of writing assignments that they can use the economic techniques learned in previous courses to analyze current economic policy issues.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 3501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ECON 3502|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3672. Owl Fund Seminar II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a continuation of ECON 3572 providing the in-depth training in applied business economics to support the William C. Dunkelberg Owl Fund as part of the economics team. Students in this course will focus on producing attribution analysis reports in support of the portfolio manager of the Owl Fund. Permission of instructor is required for admission.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ECON 3572|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ECON 3682. Independent Study. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Directed reading and/or writing assignments under supervision of a faculty member.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ECON 3696. Behavioral Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This upper-level course, provides a solid foundation for understanding the new field of Behavioral Economics. It takes rational choice theory as a point of departure and then presents the findings of Behavioral Economics, explaining how these findings either support or call for a revision to the rational expectations model. The course uses multidisciplinary findings from psychology, experimental economics, neuroscience and evolutionary psychology to enhance our understanding of how humans make economics decisions and how incentives influence those decisions. Not only CLA economic majors, but also other CLA and FSBM students should be interested in this course, as it deals with the basis of all human decision-making.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3697. The Economics of Sports. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to a variety of economic disciplines through the prism of professional and amateur sports. Students confront industrial organization and anti-trust issues involving sports leagues, public finance issues involving the relationship between cities and franchises, and labor issues involving reward systems, unions and discrimination. The course concludes with an analysis of collegiate sports and the NCAA. Students who have earned credit in ECON 3541 will not receive additional credits.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3900. Honors Topics in Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Treatment of a particular topic in economics at the Honors level. NOTE: Topic varies from semester to semester. Honors courses usually require extra reading and a paper.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 3999. Honors Thesis I. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Students work in an independent study situation to develop an original research project. Permission of the Department Chairperson required for registration.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1042|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1942|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 2043 to 3080| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 4071. Monetary Theory and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course discusses advanced topics in Monetary Economics and Banking. We will first cover an essential list of theories and techniques in monetary economics. We will then explore topics such as the choice of monetary policy rules versus discretion, the liquidity effect of open market operations and the role of the credit channel of monetary policy. All these theories and techniques emphasize the interactions between macroeconomic phenomena and individuals' decisions. Students who have earned credit in ECON 3505 will not earn additional credit for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 3501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
AND ECON 3571|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ECON 4999. Honors Thesis II. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Students continue working on the original original research project developed in ECON 3999. Permission of the Department Chairperson required for registration.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).