Geography and Urban Studies (GUS)

Courses

GUS 0813. Disability Identity. 3 Credit Hours.

Odds are that each of us will encounter disability at some point in our lives, either directly or indirectly through family, friends, neighbors, and colleagues. What is it like to live with a disability, and how does disability intersect with other aspects of personal identity, like gender, race, and culture? Is disability socially and culturally defined? Join us as we examine historical perspectives of disability marked by fear and discrimination and fueled by media portrayals. We will then explore most recent indicators of personal, social, and environmental change that support disability identity and result in a more accommodating environment for us all. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed THRC 0813.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0814. Human Ecology. 3 Credit Hours.

Human hunters may have contributed to animal extinctions as early as 10,000 years ago; civilizations in the ancient Near East developed complex irrigation networks that led to some of the area's permanent deserts. Since pre-history, humans had an impact on the environment, but changes in technology have magnified the scale of human influence. Today, attempts at sustainable land use are often at odds with struggles for indigenous population rights, with population migration and increases in population size, or with desires to preserve areas for national parks or tourism, let alone attempts to exploit natural resources. Study the ecological principles underlying the relationship of humans with the environment and the explosion of conflicts surrounding modern environmental use. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed ANTH 0814.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0821. Digital Mapping: From Mercator to Mashups. 4 Credit Hours.

From web-based applications like Google Maps, to automobile navigation systems, to satellite pictures of hurricanes, digital maps are widely used to display information about the Earth. This course unmasks the underlying technologies used for computer-based mapping, including Global Positioning Systems (GPS), satellite remote sensing, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). We will investigate how computers store and analyze digital maps, and see how mapping technologies can be used to address a variety of societal problems, such as analyzing the environmental impacts of urban growth, tracking the spread of a deadly disease, and planning for earthquakes and other natural disasters. NOTE: This course fulfills the Quantitative Literacy (GQ) requirement for students under GenEd and a Quantitative Reasoning (QA or QB) requirement for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CRP 0821 or GUS 0921.

Course Attributes: GQ

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC4 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC5 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 0829. The History & Significance of Race in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Why were relations between Native Americans and whites violent almost from the beginning of European settlement? How could slavery thrive in a society founded on the principle that "all men are created equal"? How comparable were the experiences of Irish, Jewish, and Italian immigrants, and why did people in the early 20th century think of them as separate "races"? What were the causes and consequences of Japanese Americans' internment in military camps during World War II? Are today's Mexican immigrants unique, or do they have something in common with earlier immigrants? Using a variety of written sources and outstanding documentaries, this course examines the racial diversity of America and its enduring consequences. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: African American Studies 0829, Africology and African American Studies 0829, Anthropology 0829, Geography and Urban Studies 0829, History 0829, Political Science 0829, Sociology 0829, 0929, 1376, 1396, R059, or X059.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0831. Global Cities. 3 Credit Hours.

As globalization accelerates, the world becomes smaller and is transformed to an extended urban network. Even though there are places and people off the global grid in both rich and poor countries, we live in a single, interdependent urban world. This course seeks to understand this urban world. We ask questions like: How do changes in the global economy affect the lives of people from Cairo to Chicago? As 50 million people per year move into cities around the world how do those cities change? How will the massive rural to urban migration in China and India affect resources and the global environment? What is life like in cities for the majority of the world's poor? What types of plans and policies could improve cities in this century? Are wages in Philadelphia being influenced by what happens in Beijing and Bangalore? The answers will come from a wide range of perspectives, from geographers, urban planners, sociologists, and economists. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0842. Sustainable Environments. 3 Credit Hours.

Americans account for over a quarter of all fossil fuel consumption, own more cars than there are licensed drivers, and build new homes 40 percent larger than they did in 1975, despite shrinking household size. We feel for the pandas and polar bears, while contributing mightily to global climate change, resource inequity, and ecosystem destruction. How do we reckon with environmental crises at multiple scales, from the neighborhood to the atmosphere and oceans? "Think globally, act locally" environmentalists admonish us! Direct our vast human ingenuity and collective spirit toward technologies and behaviors that bring peace with the planet. Course mission: enhance your capability to make informed choices, based on a sound understanding of the ecological, technological, economic, political, and ethical dimensions of environmental sustainability. NOTE: This course fulfills a Science & Technology (GS) requirement for students under GenEd and Science & Technology Second Level (SB) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed EES/Geology 0842 or ENST 0842.

Course Attributes: GS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0848. American Revolutions. 3 Credit Hours.

From the first encounters with Native Americans to the present, a series of pivotal moments have had an enduring influence on American society, culture, and politics. In each class, three modules will focus on three pivotal moments, such as King Philip's War, Nat Turner's Rebellion, the Scopes trial, the Civil Rights movement, the women's movement, the emergence of Elvis Presley, the sexual revolution, the rise of environmentalism, the Reagan Revolution, and 9-11. In each module, students will first place the main subject of the module in context, and then seek to understand how it changed American society. The last week of each module will be devoted to a consideration of how the subject of that module has become part of American collective memory. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: AMST 0848, ANTH 0848, History 0848, or SOC 0848.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0861. Urban Dynamics: Global, Regional, and Local Connections. 3 Credit Hours.

U.S. cities in the 21st century face enormous challenges as globalization shapes flows of people, capital, information, resources, and ideas/culture in an increasingly interconnected, yet geographically dispersed world. The course asks: What is globalization? How are different people's lives in cities shaped by these flows? How do gender, age, race/ethnicity, class, and citizenship status affect people's experiences in different urban contexts? How do urban interventions - from public policy to social movements - advance social justice across groups, places, and spaces? Topics include economic and political restructuring, the globalization of ethnic/racial relations, citizenship and public space, the spatial dynamics of uneven development, and urban inequalities. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CRP 0861 or SOC 0861.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0862. Development & Globalization. 3 Credit Hours.

Use historical and case study methods to study the differences between rich and poor nations and the varied strategies available for development in a globalizing world. Examine the challenges facing developing countries in historical and contemporary context and analyze the main social, cultural, and political factors that interact with the dynamic forces of the world economy. These include imperialism/colonialism, state formation, labor migration, demographic trends, gender issues in development, religious movements and nationalism, the challenges to national sovereignty, waves of democratization, culture and mass media, struggles for human rights, environmental sustainability, the advantages and disadvantages of globalization, and movements of resistance. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: History 0862, POLS 0862/0962, or SOC 0862/0962.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0866. World Affairs. 3 Credit Hours.

We live in a global age when events beyond our borders significantly affect our lives. Sharpen your understanding of international developments, including wars, economic globalization, wealth and poverty, the spread of democracy, environmental degradation, and global pandemics. This course offers an introduction to the study of world affairs that gives you the conceptual tools to deepen your understanding of how major historical and current trends in the world affect your life and that of others around the globe. Readings include historical documents, classic texts in the study of international relations, and current perspectives on the state of the world from multiple disciplinary perspectives. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed History 0866 or POLS 0866/0966.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0867. World Regions and Cultures: Diversity & Interconnections. 3 Credit Hours.

How does the process of globalization impact people in different culture regions? Explore this central question through readings, discussions, mapping exercises, field trips to Philadelphia sites and special events that celebrate the international flavor of the city. Focusing on four regions, we will learn how people cope with environmental problems like desertification, population growth, rapid migration to cities, and ethnic and religious clashes. We will investigate why some areas are mired in poverty and violence while others experience a growing economy and peaceful politics. For each region we will read case studies illustrating both cultural continuity and change. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: Anthropology 0867, 1061, C061 Geography and Urban Studies 0867, or Sociology 0867.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 0921. Honors Digital Mapping: From Mercator to Mashups. 4 Credit Hours.

From web-based applications like Google Maps, to automobile navigation systems, to satellite pictures of hurricanes, digital maps are widely used to display information about the Earth. This course unmasks the underlying technologies used for computer-based mapping, including Global Positioning Systems (GPS), satellite remote sensing, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). We will investigate how computers store and analyze digital maps, and see how mapping technologies can be used to address a variety of societal problems, such as analyzing the environmental impacts of urban growth, tracking the spread of a deadly disease, and planning for earthquakes and other natural disasters. NOTE: This course fulfills the Quantitative Literacy (GQ) requirement for students under GenEd and a Quantitative Reasoning (QA or QB) requirement for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CRP 0821 or GUS 0821.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GQ, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 0702 to 4999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of D-|May be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC4 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC5 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 1021. Urban Society: Race, Class, and Community. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the contemporary American city, emphasizing the major social trends and public issues that affect individuals and communities in urban settings. We emphasize a cross-disciplinary approach that includes examination of political, economic, spatial, social and historical aspects of city life. We also pay special attention to how racial, ethnic, and social class divisions shape the fabric of urban life. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race and Individual & Society (RN) requirements. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 1022. Urban Society. 1 Credit Hour.

This course provides an introduction to the contemporary American city, emphasizing the major social trends and public issues that affect individuals and communities in urban settings. We emphasize a cross-disciplinary approach that includes examination of political, economic, spatial, social and historical aspects of city life.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 1025. World Urban Patterns. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to cities around the world. We begin by asking basic questions about the nature of cities and the different approaches to studying them. We explore factors driving urban growth and how this growth affects urban environments. We examine questions of social organization and governance and topics related to planning and the future of the city. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 1031. Geography of World Affairs. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines environmental, social, demographic and economic issues in selected world regions. The course may change from semester to semester as we select a range of current topics from each part of the world, which may include, for example, the impact of drought in Africa, tourism in the Caribbean, and rapid economic growth in East Asia. We also address geopolitical themes that reflect the interaction of culture and territory, such as the conflict between ethno-religious groups for control of places that range from Sri Lanka or the Sudan. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 1052. Introduction to the Physical Environment. 4 Credit Hours.

An environmental approach to the study of earth as a globe, earth-sun relations, weather, climate, vegetation, soils, and the hydrosphere. Abundantly illustrated by slides and films, this course brings to life the causal connections among climate, vegetation, and soils. Natural and human-induced climate change, groundwater and surface water management, and soil erosion are among the environmental problems covered. The laboratories provide hands-on experience on most topics. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Science & Technology Second Level (SB) requirement.

Course Attributes: SB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 1171. Urban Affairs. 2 Credit Hours.

A special topic of current interest in American cities frequently taught by a special lecturer from outside Temple University. Emphasis on a timely public policy issue confronting Philadelphia or its region. NOTE: Topics vary each semester. Contact the department for offerings.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 1172. Urban Affairs. 2 Credit Hours.

A special topic of current interest in American cities frequently taught by a special lecturer from outside Temple University. Emphasis on a timely public policy issue confronting Philadelphia or its region. NOTE: Topics vary each semester. Contact the department for offerings.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 1173. Urban Affairs. 2 Credit Hours.

A special topic of current interest in American cities frequently taught by a special lecturer from outside Temple University. Emphasis on a timely public policy issue confronting Philadelphia or its region. NOTE: Topics vary each semester. Contact the department for offerings.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 1174. Urban Affairs. 2 Credit Hours.

A special topic of current interest in American cities frequently taught by a special lecturer from outside Temple University. Emphasis on a timely public policy issue confronting Philadelphia or its region. NOTE: Topics vary each semester. Contact the department for offerings.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 1175. Urban Affairs. 2 Credit Hours.

A special topic of current interest in American cities frequently taught by a special lecturer from outside Temple University. Emphasis on a timely public policy issue confronting Philadelphia or its region. NOTE: Topics vary each semester. Contact the department for offerings.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 1176. Urban Affairs. 2 Credit Hours.

A special topic of current interest in American cities frequently taught by a special lecturer from outside Temple University. Emphasis on a timely public policy issue confronting Philadelphia or its region. NOTE: Topics vary each semester. Contact the department for offerings.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 1177. Urban Affairs. 2 Credit Hours.

A special topic of current interest in American cities frequently taught by a special lecturer from outside Temple University. Emphasis on a timely public policy issue confronting Philadelphia or its region. NOTE: Topics vary each semester. Contact the department for offerings.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 1651. Environment and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course emphasizes the human dimensions of the relationship between societies and their natural environments. Students will be introduced to those ecological principles that are necessary to understand cultural, social, political, and economic questions at a variety of geographic scales. The course will consider several global, national, and local issues such as siting of noxious facilities, land use conflicts, equality of access to resources, and environmental justice.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 1961. Honors World Urban Patterns. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an honors section of World Urban Patterns. This course surveys urbanization as a global phenomenon. We examine urbanization in different cultures and societies and the analysis of problems of urban areas and related to urbanization in developed and developing countries, both western and non-western. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2001. Cities. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to U.S. cities in the context of contemporary globalization. Students will be introduced to key concepts in the field of urban studies. We will explore different theoretical frameworks for analyzing urban patterns, processes, and daily life. In addition to globalization we will explore social justice.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2002. Space and Place. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of human geography and examines the relationships among space, place, environment, and culture in an effort to understand why events and processes occur at specific locations, as well as how those events and processes influence activities elsewhere. Human geography studies flows of people, money, information, cultures, and biophysical processes across space and time especially as these flows are becoming global. The unique convergence of flows in a certain location is what geographers call place. This course will explore some of the key drivers of geographic outcomes including human migration, citizenship, cultural identity, political participation or exclusion, urban life, various understandings of nature and environment, and the effects of global networks and capital on local practices and people.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2012. Urban Ethnicity. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the diversity of ethnic enclaves in American cities, with a special emphasis on experiences from communities and neighborhoods in Philadelphia. This course examines sources of prejudice and discrimination, and the impact of the changing economic structure and social organization on the emergence of ethnic groups in the city. NOTE: Formerly known as GUS 4012, Urban Ethnicity. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GUS 2012 or GUS 4012.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2014. Urban Geography. 3 Credit Hours.

This course seeks to familiarize students with the new urban geography - emphasizing ecological (sustainable cities, urban donuts), economic (post Fordist accumulation), cultural (images of the city), and post modern perspectives (hi-tech corridors, mass produced aesthetic/architectural styles). It explores contemporary urban crises and challenges and examines how cities are responding. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of (a) the new geographical patterns forming in cities; (b) the economic and cultural transformations currently underway in urban areas; (c) how geographers are responding to the transformations; (d) urban responses to global challenges; and (e) how economic systems impact the lives of urban residents, images of the cities, and spatial patterns.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2017. Population Geography. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to human populations with respect to size, composition and spatial distribution, and the issues surrounding the geographic distribution of populations at the world, regional, and local level. Emphasis will be placed on the role of population processes (mortality, fertility, migration), and population structures (age, gender, ethnicity), on economic, social, technological and political development and changes in different parts of the world. Topics covered in this course include: population policies, theories of population change, international and domestic migration flows, cultural and economic influences on population processes, urbanization, and population related issues such as food insecurity, political conflict, poverty, health and disease, and environmental degradation. Lectures and exercises will also familiarize students to publicly available population data and introduce basic analytical techniques used to measure fertility, mortality and migration.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2021. Philadelphia Neighborhoods. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to Philadelphia, its history, its people, and its problems as seen in a cross-section of urban neighborhoods. It combines lectures, readings, and slides with frequent field trips to different parts of the city.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2025. American Place. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores several basic themes on the variety of human landscapes that characterize the United States. A representative selection of places across the country is examined in lectures, readings, film, slides, and short field trips to learn about the cultures and social characteristics of the American people.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2031. Economic Geography. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the complex economic patterns of the world. It examines why economic activities are distributed in particular ways and the consequences of economic location decisions. It examines a variety of economic activities and geographic perspectives on economic and settlement diversity.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2032. Urban Systems in a Global Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at how the global economy shapes urban society, and how people adapt to the changing global urban world. We begin examining theories, facts and debates on globalization and the development of the global economy. We then look at how cities function within an interdependent global urban system and how people actively respond to the changing economic conditions in cities around the world.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2051. Urban Environment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the interactions between theory, policy, and the urban environment. Students have the opportunity to study the urban environment not only as a physical landscape or natural ecosystem, but also as a constructed landscape shaped by local, regional and global social, economic and political processes. The course addresses issues that continue to challenge urban society, including environmental injustice and racism, degradation of local environmental quality, the impact of local-global relationships on community-scale environments and the commodification of nature.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2061. Map Interpretation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the basic principles of mapping and spatial data handling. Topics covered include geographic scale, projections and coordinate systems, cartographic generalization, spatial data encoding, and map design and production. Emphasis will be on a variety of geographic data technologies, including cartographic production, geographic information systems, global positioning systems, environmental remote sensing, and photogrammetry.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2071. Geography of the United States and Canada. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the major regions of the United States and Canada with emphasis on changing population and economic activity patterns, the distribution of important resources, and the characteristics of major cities and metropolitan areas. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2073. African Development. 3 Credit Hours.

This course begins with a historical synopsis of the different forms of development that have taken place on the African continent. Moving beyond preconceived notions of the continent, students will delve into the social, political, economic, and biophysical realms of Africa. Students will read and debate about issues concerning African development, including, colonialism, independence movements, political conflict, globalization, neo-liberalism, society, and health. Ultimately, in this course, students will gain a deeper appreciation of the social, economic, environmental, and political development of Africa and the challenges and opportunities it faces in the future. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2074. East and South Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the natural environments and diverse contemporary societies that comprise East, Southeast, and South Asia. Emphasis on such topics as poverty, economic development, and social conditions in India, Thailand, and the Philippines, as well as China, Japan, and Korea. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2096. Problems of Environmental Quality. 3 Credit Hours.

Specific environmental problems, especially in the Philadelphia area. Students acting as research teams seek better understanding of such problems and practical solutions to them. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS and ENST 4096. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2097. Urban Systems in the Global Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

Globalization has been marked by a series of processes that include (a) the falling costs and rising speeds of transportation and communication, (b) the broader and more rapid dissemination of ideas and ideologies, and (c) the creation of new institutions to control the flow of people and money. As a historical process, globalization has been marked by a series of stages: mercantilism, colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, and, in the last 20 years, a period of internationalism and that some scholars call 'hyper-globalization' - led by the same key processes. Historically, it gave rise to the 'new' world of the Americas, and created nation-states in 'dark' continents and among 'primitive' peoples ruled by 'despotic' regimes. It has also affected the geography of metropolitan areas by shaping their location, growth, internal structure, prospects, and welfare distribution.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2121. Russian Cities. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course we will study the Russian city, analyzing the nexus of physical geography, climate, natural resources, ethnography, history, commerce, politics and culture on the development of urban centers in Russia. The study of Moscow and St. Petersburg will occupy much of our attention in this course, but we will also examine Russia's medieval cities ("the Golden Ring"), as well as cities in Siberia and the Far East. We will read works from the disciplines of geography, history, anthropology, and sociology, as well as works of fiction; we will also view Russian films in which a city (or the city) plays an important role.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 2197. Research Design in Geography and Urban Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introductory survey of research design in Geography and Urban Studies. It is designed to allow students to explore what it means to conduct social science research, particularly around urban and other geographic topics of study. Students have the opportunity to learn how to collect and analyze primary and secondary data. Methods covered include case study research, interview design and technique, analysis of spatial quantitative data, and tools commonly used in community and participatory action research. Individual assignments will focus on researching urban social and cultural topics. This is a writing intensive course and will require extensive writing and revision of your assignments in a semester long assignment sequence.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3000. Special Topics in Geography and Urban Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars on special topics that vary according to the instructor. Check the course schedule for specific seminar topics.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 3001. Images of the City in Popular Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the representations of the city in the film, fiction, art, and music of the twentieth century. We look at images of cities in general as well as images of specific cities, especially Los Angeles and New York. (When taught in Rome or Tokyo the course focus changes to take advantage of the setting.) Imaginings about the city rely on metaphors - using a work or phrase to describe by referring to another thing not literally appropriate, e.g. urban jungle. We will discuss these metaphors and become familiar with their resonance in popular culture. A large part of the course will focus on methods of visual analysis. Active participation is required.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3005. The City in History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at the city as a product of human creativity in which the goals of collective life are debated and fought out. The workings of the city are examined in history by focus on the cultural, economic, and political significance of cities as well as on urban design. The course includes visual examples from cities in Europe, West Africa, India, and Southeast Asia as well as a walking tour in the Manayunk section of Philadelphia.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3011. Historical Geography of North America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the evolution of the spatial structure of North America from the early stage of predominantly rural, localized economies to conditions that could be characterized as interconnected and urbanized. Several themes will be emphasized: 1) changes in the structure of rural settlements, 2) the expansion of the transport network, 3) the emergence of an industrial economy, and 4) changes in both the internal structure of urban places and the distribution of such places.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3013. African Americans in Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the historical and contemporary circumstances and roles of African Americans in the Philadelphia context. A critical look at African American migration to Philadelphia, the emergence of African American ethnicity, and the nature and workings of predominantly African American institutions in the city (e.g., families, churches, education, media, cultural and recreational institutions, gangs, political movements, and organizations).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 1021|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3014. Urban Social Geography. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students with the major issues in urban social geography. The general questions addressed in the course include (a) how do racial and income groups come to occupy certain sections of the city?; (b) who decides who lives where?; (c) how does a person's area of residence affect his/her behavior?; (d) what are the constraints on choosing where one lives?; and what groups are able to manipulate the geography of the city and who benefits? The course highlights interpretations associated with the cultural turn in geography and accordingly focuses on the cultural/social vs. the "economic." Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS 4014. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3015. The Geographic Basis of Land Use Planning. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the forces that influence land use planning in and around American metropolitan regions. Considers economic perspectives (land values), public interest perspectives (zoning subdivision, housing and building codes, redevelopment and renewal programs, etc.), and social perspectives of land use. Also examines separately housing, commercial locations, and industrial development. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS and ENST 4015. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3016. Contemporary Issues in City Planning. 3 Credit Hours.

Detailed analysis of a specific issue affecting cities and metropolitan areas, usually with a focus on the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Issues such as sprawl, redevelopment, and sustainability are often the focus of the course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3018. Economic Development Planning for Cities. 3 Credit Hours.

Causes of economic decline in American cities, the history of governmental policies to promote urban economic development, and the major tools available to economic planners. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS 4018. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credits if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 1025|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1961|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 2031|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3019. Community Development Workshop. 3 Credit Hours.

Students apply the insights, skills and techniques acquired during undergraduate coursework to a number of case studies and assignments drawn from different planning contexts. As in a professional office, students will work in teams to obtain experience in cooperative action and in the management of time and effort. Projects will be selected in order to expose students to the complexity of real problems, and to suggest the range of policy and planning issues which students might encounter after graduation. Senior practitioners in the Philadelphia region work with students in the workshop. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS 4019. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3021. International Urbanization. 3 Credit Hours.

Each year the cities of the world increase by about 50 million people with most of the increase coming from cities in middle and lower income countries in Asia, South Asia and Africa. This course provides an opportunity for students to focus specifically on urbanization outside the mature urban societies of the United States, Europe and Japan. This course examines issues confronted by planners, policy makers and citizens in rapidly urbanizing areas, as well as the social and cultural tensions related to urban change. NOTE: This course is generally offered every other year. Prior to Spring 2009, the course title was "Urbanization in Developing Areas." Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS 4021. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3025. Urban Crime Patterns. 3 Credit Hours.

The spatial dimensions and patterns of crime and how they vary with respect to other variables in the urban environment. Possible explanations of crime, using both current literature and Philadelphia statistics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3044. Urban Housing. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of the economic, social, physical, and political forces that structure current urban housing conditions and prospects. Examination of the implications of present trends for the future and the development of rational housing policies, emphasizing the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS 4044. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 1021|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1022|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1025|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1961|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3051. Environmental Policy Issues. 3 Credit Hours.

How are environmental policies formulated and implemented in the U.S.? Topics include the role of citizen participation in decision-making, the place of environmental impact assessment, environmental justice and equity, intergovernmental relations, and environmental obligations of the U.S. toward less developed countries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3052. Environmental Problems in Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

Japan is used as an introduction and model for examining environmental issues in several East and Southeast Asian countries. Emphasis is on deforestation, river basin development, urban planning, ecotourism, and the role of non-governmental organizations.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3053. Climatology. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, we study global climate patterns and the underlying processes that shape them. Among the specific topics we examine are: global distribution of individual climate elements, upper-atmospheric waves and jet streams, use of web-based maps and data, construction of climate models, U.S. climate regions, and major global climatic regions. In the course's final weeks, we consider historic climates, climate change mechanisms, and forecasted future climates.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(GUS 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (GUS 1052|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

GUS 3054. Energy, Resources, and Conservation. 3 Credit Hours.

Vital nonrenewable resources are identified and their global and North American distribution, character, and utilization studied. Special attention to energy sources now in short supply and to benign renewable sources for future needs.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3055. Geography of Hazards. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a synthesis of the social and natural dimensions of disasters. Students become familiar with the concept that disasters emerge when the specific characteristics of hazards (e.g. volcanoes, droughts, floods, tsunamis) intersect with social vulnerability (e.g. class, race, gender). Case studies from around the world are used to elaborate and explore this concept. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS and ENST 4051. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3056. Political Ecology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the broad themes of political ecology as an academic discipline as well as a set of theoretical and methodological tools. Historically political ecology has focused on the rural developing world, but more recent work has branched out into environmental justice and resource use in industrialized societies. The course covers the concepts that have distinguished political ecology from other types of analysis like cultural and human ecology. It also introduces students to the construction of theory including a consideration of space, scale, justice, feminism, property, and nature. Finally, the course presents students with diverse case studies that may include topics like resource use, mining, bio-prospecting, forestry, conservation, fisheries, "sustainable" development, and eco-tourism. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS and ENST 4056. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3061. Fundamentals of Cartography. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to cartography and computer mapping. Through hands-on exercises, students will manipulate data, compare map projections, design, execute, and reproduce small-scale thematic maps suitable for publication using computer software. A final project involves the production of maps in color. NOTE: No prior computer knowledge is necessary.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3062. Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course teaches the theory and practical use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Major components of the course include vector and raster spatial data models and operations, including vector overlay and raster map algebra. At the end of the course students are expected to have an understanding of elementary GIS theory, working knowledge of a GIS software package, and the ability to develop GIS-based solutions to geographic modeling and analysis tasks.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3063. Environmental Remote Sensing. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will teach the basic principles of environmental remote sensing using aerial photography and satellite imagery. Topics covered include the mechanics of aerial photography and satellite remote sensing systems, photointerpretation, image rectification, and image processing and classification. Emphasis will be on urban and environmental applications.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3064. Qualitative Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

This class is designed to expose students to the purpose, scope and procedures of qualitative research, applied in different disciplines but especially in environmental studies, geography, and urban planning. It provides an opportunity for students to create qualitative research design schemes, and critically analyze research using these methods.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 2097|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3067. GIS and Location Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the concepts and techniques of location analysis - how to 1) describe the spatial arrangements of features on the earth's surface and 2) prescribe the best location or spatial arrangement of features for a particular activity - for economic and social service applications. The course introduces concepts in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial statistics to address issues of location.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3069. GIS for Health Data Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has emerged as an essential tool for health researchers and practitioners. This course provides an introduction to the most common geographic methods utilized in health research and spatial epidemiology for mapping and analyzing health disparities, disease risk factors, health services and geographic variation in health outcomes and disease. Through lecture and laboratory exercises students will learn how to create and edit spatial data, create disease maps, develop neighborhood-based measures, conduct geographic cluster detection and point pattern analysis, map geographic health disparities, measure access to health services, and critically assess potential study bias introduced from missing geographic data or positional accuracy. Selected case studies will be presented in order to highlight methods and techniques and hands-on experience will be gained through laboratory exercises and real-world applications. Guest speakers will be invited to share their real-world examples of GIS in health research and practice.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3161|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3161|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 3201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 2219|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR CJ 2602|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ANTH 3771|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3071. Medical Geography. 3 Credit Hours.

Medical geography applies concepts and methods from the discipline of geography to study medical and health related events and topics. Medical geography has a close disciplinary tie with epidemiology, biostatistics, medical ecology and medical anthropology, but it is differentiated by its focus on the spatial distributions of health/medical related events. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under ENST and GUS 4071. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3073. Geography of Travel and Tourism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the fastest growing industry in the world from a geographic perspective. Among the topics to be covered are spatial tourism models, tourism landscapes and the built environment and the impact of tourism on local cultures and economies. Several types of tourism are compared, including rural vs. urban travel, heritage tourism and ecotourism. There is also a special project that focuses on the problems of developing a tourist industry in areas that are prone to political or environmental crises. The course presents examples of both domestic and international travel destinations.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3074. Sicily: The Land, People and Identity. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the physical and social geography of Sicily, looking at its land, history, culture, and current problems as represented in literature and on film.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3075. Comparative Regional Development. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the transformations that, beginning with the European expansion 500 years ago, have, to a large extent, created much of the regional variation we see in the world today. We consider theoretical approaches to understanding "modernization" and "development" and build on this foundation to look at the historic factors that have shaped different parts of the world. We also examine the political, economic, social, spatial and environmental processes that have influenced those countries that share a colonial past (our primary focus) but also may examine the transition economies of Eastern Europe, Asia and North America and Japan. NOTE: This course is generally offered every other year. Prior to Spring 2009, the course title was "Regional Development in the Third World." Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS 4075. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3076. Metropolitan Tokyo. 3 Credit Hours.

The growth and development of Tokyo, Japan, past and present. The course includes a profile of the city's many neighborhoods, economic activities, architecture, and challenges for urban planners. NOTE: Usually offered at Temple Japan.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3085. Internship in Geography and Urban Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides coursework during both the fall and spring semester to accompany on-the-job training with local consulting firms, planning agencies, private companies, non-profits, and various state, local and federal agencies of government, mostly but not exclusively in the Philadelphia metro area. Students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in such courses as GIS, cartography, data handling, land use analysis, economic development of cities and others. Students need to arrange their own positions, usually after consulting with the department's internship coordinator. The search for a placement should start several months in advance of the semester or summer session when the internship will take place. The course is available to GUS majors and minors only. NOTE: Must arrange internship independently. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS 4085/ENST 4085. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3096. Urban Policy Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Contemporary policy analysis of urban problems and issues, including ideological, political, social movement, and community organizing perspectives. Sample policy areas are housing, education, segregation, employment, welfare, and spatial inequality.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 1021|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1022|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3097. Environment & Development. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at the interaction between human and ecological systems and economic development. We begin with an historical overview of the impact of human communities on the environment. We then shift attention to the environmental impacts of European expansion from the 1600s to the present. In the final section of the course we examine specific cases that highlight the ideas discussed previously. The cases focus on settlement systems, environmental factors and conflict, sustainable systems, vulnerability, water issues, etc. This course requires active participation.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3161. Spatial Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to statistical analysis with an emphasis on urban applications. The course covers basic statistical principles of sampling, probability, and tests of significance, measures of association; ordinary least squares regression; factor, principal component and cluster analysis and an introduction to spatial applications of these tools. The course is focused on the practical application of these techniques through exposure to the rationale and principles underpinning them. Students will attend lectures and complete problem sets that provide practical experience in the application of the theoretical concepts and methodologies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 0702|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 3307. Transportation & Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will learn to approach the modern geography of transportative possibility from a critical standpoint. Rather than accepting this contemporary geography as being the outcome of supposedly "superior" transport technologies' rendering marginalized technologies obsolete, students will examine how processes of cultural, political, and environmental struggle have shaped, opened up, and in some cases limited the modern array of possibilities for human mobility. Waterborne, animal-based, and human-powered modes of transportation will receive special attention, as will ongoing debates and struggles over automobile planning and mass transit. The history of transportation will be presented as necessarily entangled with parallel histories of public protest, working-class knowledge, emergency logistics, human-animal relations, guerrilla warfare, unrealized technologies, and political oppression. The course readings will look at many parts of the world: the United States, Canada, Southeast Asia, North Africa, the Middle East, China, Western Europe, the Caribbean, and Polynesia.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3314. Food Studies: A Geographical Perspective. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to key issues in food studies from a geographical and environmental perspective. The course includes an overview of the agricultural transitions, and examines issues of food security, access and control, ultimately focusing attention on the question of how to produce more just food systems. A major goal of this course is to give students a basic foundation from which to understand and interpret food systems as well as to familiarize students with today's major issues in research on food.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 3928. Honors Metropolitan Tokyo. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an honors version of Metropolitan Tokyo. The course looks at the growth and development of Tokyo, Japan, past and present. It includes a profile of the city's many neighborhoods, economic activities, architecture, and challenges for urban planners. NOTE: Usually offered at Temple Japan.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 4000. Special Topics in Geography and Urban Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars on special topics that vary according to the instructor. Check the course schedule for specific seminar topics.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 4013. Drugs in Urban Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to and overview of how illicit drugs have affected communities and individuals in American cities. It will focus on the history of drug use in America, the individual and social consequences of drug use, the lifestyles of crack and heroin addicts, the relationship between drugs and crime, as well as an examination of public policy options to address this problem.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 4061. Cartographic Production. 3 Credit Hours.

A course concerned with aspects of storage, retrieval, and display of information within geographic data systems. Emphasis will be placed on computer mapping. NOTE: This course is cross-listed with ENST 4061; students will only receive credit for one course from GUS 4061 and ENST 4061.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 4064. Web Mapping and GIS. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, students will explore theoretical and practical concepts of Web Mapping (GIS and spatial data visualization on the Internet). From a theoretical perspective they will study advantages and techniques for publishing, visualizing and accessing maps and data on the Internet. This entails examining architectures of Web GIS/Web mapping systems, markup languages (e.g. HTML, XML, SVG, and KML), scripting languages, screen cartography, data sharing and geoportals, as well as social and critical perspectives toward web mapping. From a practical perspective they will learn to develop Web mapping applications including static and interactive platforms. They will also learn and work with some well-known open source software and libraries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 4065. Urban Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to build on the basic principles of the introductory GIS course to demonstrate how GIS may be applied to the analysis of physical and human systems. Topics of the course include vector and raster data integration; address matching, geocoding, and network analysis; terrain and hydrological analysis; and interpolation of environmental and population data. At the end of the course the student is expected to grasp advanced GIS analysis and modeling concepts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 4078. Research Methods in Environmental Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers basic research design and methods for environmental research, consulting, and practice. We build this around the theme of environmental impact assessment (EIA). During the course of your environmental careers, most of you will be expected to conduct, reference, evaluate, or otherwise incorporate EIA into your work. Most EIA's incorporate a diverse set of research methods - and an understanding of a wide-ranging set of research methodologies, and when and how to deploy them - is a central objective for this course. The first third of the course covers project design and methods; the second third addresses the environmental impact assessment process and especially its methodological components; and the final section is a highly interactive (with much peer review) approach to the development and defense of the methodologies you employ in the research prospectus that you develop for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(GUS 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SOC 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PSY 1167|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 1013|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 3161|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 1967|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

GUS 4082. Independent Study Environmental Geography. 3 Credit Hours.

Reading and/or papers undertaken by the student wishing to study a specific topic, under the active supervision of a faculty member.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 4087. Mapping Practicum I. 3 Credit Hours.

Complements theoretical studies by directing advanced students through real-world cartographic experiences. The student is assigned cartographic projects and is encouraged to plan, design, and execute them for University faculty and outside firms and agencies.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GUS 4097. Gender, Race, Class, and the City. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at gender, race, and class in the city. We begin with the assumption that urban spaces are important indicators of experience, defining what is possible and thereby influencing the life chances of the people who operate within them. We pay particular attention to women, people of color, and people in poverty. We approach the city as a crucible and receptacle containing the ideas and experiences of these diverse groups. This is a writing intensive seminar, and you will be expected to write and share your ideas with others throughout the course. There will be opportunities to write and/or think about writing during each class period.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 4182. Independent Study Research. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Reading and/or papers undertaken by the student wishing to study a specific topic, under the active supervision of a faculty member.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 4198. Senior Seminar in Geography and Urban Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

A topically organized seminar for senior majors or those obtaining a concentration in Geography and Urban Studies. NOTE: This course is for majors only. Students should take this course during their last semester.

Field of Study Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of study: Environmental Studies, Geography/Urban Studies
Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GUS 4282. Independent Study Human Geography. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Reading and/or papers undertaken by the student wishing to study a specific topic, under the active supervision of a faculty member.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 4382. Independent Study Urban Policy. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Reading and/or papers undertaken by the student wishing to study a specific topic, under the active supervision of a faculty member.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

GUS 4982. Honors Independent Study Environmental Geography. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Reading and/or papers undertaken by the student wishing to study a specific topic, under the active supervision of a faculty member.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..