Higher Education, Ed.D.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

About the Program

The Ed.D. in Higher Education is a rigorous program of study that helps students develop the skills needed to diagnose and resolve organizational challenges and to craft and evaluate programs and policies impacting student success. The program features a core set of courses that reflect the essential values of the Temple University graduate program in higher education and the foundational knowledge, skills, and abilities required for effective postsecondary administrative practice. This program combines the theoretical and methodological foundations of academic research with an applied focus that helps students develop the professional and interpersonal wisdom necessary to successfully manage change within complex organizational structures.

The Higher Education Ed.D. degree prepares its graduates to be not just effective administrators but skillful and visionary leaders. The essential expected learning outcomes of the Ed.D. in Higher Education include:

  • Demonstrate advanced understanding of the foundations of higher education, including knowledge of the history, politics, economics, and philosophy of higher education, theories of student development and organizations, and the institutional and social factors that contribute to student success in higher education.
  • Demonstrate a disciplined and analytic approach to professional practice in the organization and administration of academic and student affairs, including the use of assessment, evaluation, and research in decision making; the ability to engage in strategic planning and goal setting; the ability to lead with cultural sensitivity and ethical judgment; the ability to understand organizational behavior and dynamics; and the ability to communicate clearly and effectively about complex administrative issues to a wide array of audiences and stakeholders.
  • Demonstrate knowledge related to the functional core of the university, including teaching, research, and service; management skills, such as problem solving, planning, budgeting, fundraising, and assessment and evaluation; and human relations skills, such as managing conflict, communicating effectively, valuing diversity, and promoting organizational and individual development.
  • Gain a conceptual understanding of higher education organizations when viewed from multiple perspectives, including organizations as academic enterprises, loosely coupled bureaucratic systems, and complex multifarious cultures, and be able to adopt those perspectives as analytic lenses for understanding and addressing administrative issues.
  • Demonstrate the ability to select and apply appropriate research and program evaluation designs and methods, including understanding principles of research study design; synthesizing relevant literature from across fields to inform practice and research; articulating and applying theory or conceptual frameworks to support analysis and evaluation; having familiarity with an array of qualitative and quantitative methods and competence in data analysis strategies appropriate for contributing knowledge to advance effective higher education practice; and being competent in academic writing conventions.
  • Enact habits of reflective and equity-conscious administrative practitioners, including conducting critical inquiry into issues of inequity or disparities in student access and success; engaging as learning agents on behalf of the institution; and collecting, interpreting, and communicating evidence to substantiate administrative issues.

Time Limit for Degree Completion: 7 years

Campus Location: Main

Full-Time/Part-Time Status: Students may matriculate either full-time or part-time. Most courses are offered in the evening to accommodate working professionals. The length of time to complete the doctoral degree program varies depending on the number of courses taken each term.

Accreditation: The program is accredited by the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA).

Job Prospects: Graduates typically become senior administrators in public or private schools; administrators in state or federal agencies; and administrators or professors in institutions of higher education.

Non-Matriculated Student Policy: Students may take up to, but not more than, 9 credits of graduate study in the program before being admitted to the program. The credits transfer into the program, if the student is admitted. Students completing non-matriculated courses before being admitted to the program are NOT guaranteed admission.

Financing Opportunities: Financial support opportunities may include assistantships, fellowships, scholarships, tuition remission, graduate student employment, and other financial aid such as grants, loans, and federal work study.

Admission Requirements and Deadlines

Application Deadline:

Fall: December 1

Applications are accepted for the Fall term only. Applicants should submit all required admissions documents by the application deadline to receive priority consideration for admission and financial support.

APPLY ONLINE to this graduate program.

Letters of Reference:
Number Required: 2

From Whom: Letters of recommendation should be obtained to provide insight regarding the applicant's academic competence. References from college/university faculty are recommended.

Master's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A master's degree in a related field is required. Students will be expected to transfer in up to 30 credits as advanced standing, with approval.

Bachelor's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A bachelor's degree is required. A minimum UGPA of 3.0 is expected.

International applicants should also submit an official document that validates completion and conferral of a degree, diploma, and/or certificate. While not required, international applicants are encouraged to submit transcript(s) to the World Education Services (WES) for evaluation.

Statement of Goals: Using autobiographical style, explain your interest in pursuing a doctoral degree in education. The statement should address the following questions:

  • How have your personal, academic, and professional experiences shaped your research interests, and how might a doctoral program in Education help you explore those interests?
  • What academic/professional goals would the program help you to achieve following graduation?
  • How does the doctoral program at Temple fit your individual interests, needs, and future goals – and which faculty member’s research best matches your own interests?

Standardized Test Scores:
Applicants whose native language is not English must provide scores from a TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic exam. Scores must meet the following minimums:

TOEFL: 79 iBT or 550 PBT
IELTS: 6.5
PTE Academic: 53

Resume: Current resume required.

Writing Sample: The academic writing sample should be a paper written for a class within the last five years. If a recent paper is not available, the applicant should compose an op-ed piece on an educational issue of her/his choosing. The op-ed should be 400 to 1,200 words in length and of the kind that might appear in The New York Times or Philadelphia Inquirer.

Other Requirement: Official undergraduate and graduate transcripts from all accredited institutions attended and/or from which credit was earned must be submitted.

Program Requirements

General Program Requirements:
Number of Credits Required Beyond the Master's: 39

Required Courses:

Higher Education Core Courses
HIED 8101Advanced Seminar on Higher Education Administration3
HIED 8102Higher Education Economics and Finance3
HIED 8103Equity in Higher Education Policy and Practice3
HIED 8104Seminar on Theory in Higher Education and Leadership (7-week course)3
Electives 16
Advanced Research Methods Courses
EDUC 5262Introduction to Qualitative Research 23
EDUC 5325Introduction to Statistics and Research 23
EPSY 8627Introduction to Research Design and Methods3
In addition, select one course from the following:3
Tests and Measurements
Intermediate Educational Statistics
Multivariate Research Methods
Advanced Practice-Based Qualitative Research in Higher Education
Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation Courses
EDUC 9998Dissertation Proposal Design3
EDUC 9999Doctor of Education Dissertation3
HIED 8093Advanced Higher Education Research Seminar 33
Total Credit Hours39
1

Students select a two-course cognate based on their dissertation interests. They should consult with their advisor in the selection of these electives.

2

Students must take the “introductory” versions of the qualitative (EDUC 5262) and quantitative (EDUC 5325) courses before enrolling in more advanced courses for either methodology. A student can be exempted from the introductory courses if program faculty believe the student's prior coursework warrants an exemption. Approval from the student's advisor is required.

3

HIED 8093 must be taken during or after the last academic term of coursework.

Culminating Events:
Comprehensive Exam:
At the end of the academic term in which students are enrolled in HIED 8093 Advanced Higher Education Research Seminar and prior to completion of the dissertation proposal, students complete a comprehensive exam in order to advance to candidacy for the doctoral degree. The comprehensive exam consists of written responses to three questions developed by the instructor of the Research Seminar who, in most cases, will serve as the student’s primary dissertation advisor and chair. Through the comprehensive exam, students must demonstrate the ability to:

  • situate and define a chosen topic or field within the concepts and history of the field;
  • compare, contrast, and justify various research methods appropriate to investigation of a practice-based research problem; and
  • critically synthesize the extant scholarly and practice-focused literature that informs administrative practice related to the topic.

Successful completion of the comprehensive exam advances students to doctoral candidate status and aids in preparation of the dissertation proposal.

Dissertation Proposal:
In the term immediately following completion of the HIED 8093 Advanced Higher Education Research Seminar and successful completion of the comprehensive exam, students enroll in EDUC 9998 Dissertation Proposal Design. Students enroll in a section of EDUC 9998 with the same cohort of students and instructor with whom they were enrolled in HIED 8093. Like HIED 8093 Advanced Higher Education Research Seminar, EDUC 9998 serves as a structured, intensive, cohort-based monthly workshop in which students design and defend a dissertation proposal that outlines a rigorous plan for empirical study of an issue relevant to the student’s professional responsibilities or aspirations. The proposal must incorporate a thorough and critical review of literature relevant to the topic, a discussion of theoretical approaches to understanding and studying the topic, a conceptual or theoretical framework that will guide the study, and a robust methodological plan that includes assurances of completing IRB review and any interview or other protocols necessary to submit for IRB review. Dissertation proposal defense occurs at any point during or at the end of the academic term and students receive feedback from the faculty advisor, other committee members, and their cohort peers during their defense. Students will be encouraged to defend the proposal no later than the end of the term in which they are enrolled in EDUC 9998.

Dissertation:
The Ed.D. dissertation is distinct from the Ph.D. dissertation in that the intent of the Ed.D. dissertation is not to build theory but to make a substantive contribution to practice-focused scholarship in a particular domain of higher education. Ed.D. dissertations are typically less lengthy than Ph.D. dissertations and cover a smaller scope of theorizing and data collection. They are, however, held to the same standards as Ph.D. dissertations with respect to methodological validity, data analysis, and writing quality and clarity. Toward this end, Ed.D. students:

  • prepare a dissertation study report that is a standard academic manuscript, which includes an introduction, literature review, conceptual/theoretical framework, methodology, results, discussion, and references; and
  • produce a Practice Guide that is three to five pages in length. The Practice Guide distills the lessons of the student's research into succinct recommendations or best practices for practitioners in her/his field.

Courses

HIED 5101. Introduction to Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this introductory seminar is to provide a foundation in the theory, research and practice of higher and post-secondary education. This course examines the history and philosophy as well as contemporary issues related to the development, missions, and functions of American colleges and universities. The course introduces graduate students to the interdisciplinary field of higher education which bridges theory, practice, policy and empirical scholarship. Course content aims to enhance and develop students' abilities to critically understand higher education as a site of opportunity and challenge and how these institutions continue to adapt to social, political, economic and demographic forces.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5102. Administration of Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to help students develop their own practices as principled and effective higher education leaders. Successful administrators have to understand the complexity of the organizations in which they work as well as the political, economic, and social ecosystems in which those organizations are situated. This course helps students understand how to situate particular higher education administrative challenges (retention and student success, equity, learning and assessment, etc.) within the complex organizational and governance structures of higher education institutions. The course also explores theories of organizational culture, learning and change through which administrators can effectively make sense of and address the most pressing challenges in higher education.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5103. Access and Equity in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers theory and best practices to help professionals better prepare students underrepresented in higher education for what it takes academically and personally to enroll in and transition through college and onto careers. Focal areas will include: pre-college programs created and designed to assist these underrepresented students and connecting student access and success programs as partners with institutions of higher learning. This course will also provide strategic planning models to assist course participants in analyzing how access and success programs can be an integral part of an institution. Students gain more knowledge of access and equity concerns and the resources necessary to help students successfully navigate postsecondary opportunities.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5104. College Students and Development Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers theories, perspectives and research that inform contemporary college students' development and experiences. The study of American college students reflects the history and development of social and cultural issues that have marked the society's general development. The perspectives and experiences of contemporary students in colleges and universities inform institutional policy as well as directives for the larger society. This is an introductory course focused on students in higher education as an area of professional practice and research. Course content examines theory and college as theoretical context, student development and identity formation within and beyond higher education institutions and links theory with professional practice.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5201. Diversity Issues in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

While colleges and universities have historically struggled to attract and retain students from diverse populations, growing political, economic and ethical demands of the day have forced many to revisit their institutional commitment to diversity and inclusion. This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to critically examine the impact of diversity on all postsecondary stakeholders including students, staff, faculty members, administrators, policy makers, local community members and employers. Using various theoretical models, this course will also help students develop a shared language around diversity, assess institutional missions and responses to diversity and inclusion, and finally, to develop a knowledge base to support strategies for inclusive advising and student support practices in higher education.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5202. Higher Education Economics and Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides aspiring leaders, administrators and academics with an overview of economics and finance in higher education. The premise of this course is that in today's increasingly demanding higher education environment, with challenges such as budget cuts, rising institutional costs, tuition pressures, affordability, access and success, the most effective higher education leader must possess at least a basic understanding of postsecondary economics and finance. This course is designed to instill that knowledge, as well as to provide students with an opportunity to critically analyze the literature, issues, and recent trends, for purposes of both practical application and ongoing research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5203. Getting into College: Strategic Enrollment Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on topical issues in enrollment management in higher education and is intended to serve as an introductory seminar. As such, it aims to provide a forum for thoughtful and meaningful discussion of readings and materials related to strategic activities in enrollment management. The course supports the notion that practice of admissions is not a singular independent activity, but in fact, is an integral part and linked to what we know about the development, mission, and current student profile issues that influence institutional practice. Therefore, the course uses current readings and research (e.g., journal articles, books, higher educational newspapers, reports, and internet resources) to examine issues at the core knowledge base of enrollment management theory and practice in higher education.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5301. Planning and Assessment in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the accreditation, planning and assessment processes in higher education. It is a graduate-level seminar designed to introduce students to theory, uses, and outcomes of planning in higher education. Strategic planning is a long-standing practice in the business world, but planning--as a proactive and integrated activity--is an expanding practice in American colleges and universities. The course explores accreditation processes particularly how institutional self-assessment and adherence to standards for student learning outcomes assure higher education's internal and external publics that accredited institutions are fulfilling their stated purposes and addressing public and policy expectations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5401. Student Affairs in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a survey to student affairs as an area of professional practice in higher education. Course content examines the organization and administration of student affairs in postsecondary institutions in the United States and also encourages the application of research and theory to student affairs practice. Specifically, theories, research, and methods are introduced to encourage reflective application to professional practice. Learning objectives and outcomes for the course will be achieved by exploring the following topics: administrative environment of student affairs; organizational and management issues related to student affairs; essential skills and competencies for student affairs administrators and leaders; diversity/equity issues in student affairs; assessment; professional development; and future challenges and opportunities for professional practice in the field.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5502. Digital Education Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

This course develops prospective online higher education leaders' vision, skills, and knowledge necessary to responsibly facilitate and sustain online education programming within post-secondary institutions. The premise of this course is that in today's increasingly digitized and online higher education environment - one that has given rise to new forms of faculty development, academic support systems, interdepartmental relationships, and federal/state policies - the successful higher education leader must nurture a vision that will advance both the institution's mission and diverse learners' individual goals. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to critically analyze the literature, emergent trends, and various professional standards for purposes of both practical application and ongoing evaluative research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5801. Gender Issues in Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This graduate-level seminar serves as a survey of gender issues across the education pipeline. Course content is based on studies of primary, secondary and college settings with implications for administration and leadership. This course examines gender issues including identity development and constructions within diverse education spaces. Placing gender at the center of discussion about education, this course connects research to practice and policy. The perspectives and experiences of contemporary students as well as educators inform this "practice and policy" of gender. Although gender is at the heart of this course, considerable emphasis is also placed on the intersection of race, class and sexual orientation in education.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5802. Leadership in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

While many higher education classes on leadership focus on the functional roles and hierarchical structures of leaders within postsecondary educational institutions, this class centers on the development and expression of individual leadership qualities. Current theories of leadership will be explored as well as the interpersonal skills necessary to be an effective leader within higher educational institutions. Topics will include: The self-reflective leader, career planning assessments, leadership theories and practices, communication skills for leaders and reflections and recommendations from current exemplary leaders in colleges.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5803. Law and Policy in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide an intensive theoretical and pragmatic inquiry into the ways that higher education administrative practice is regulated. The course examines regulation not just in terms of the legal institution (i.e., case law and the courts) but also as the array of social and political structures that impact the delivery and management of postsecondary education. In addition to major legal events and controversies impacting higher education, students will become familiar with key federal regulation, state and federal policy, and internal institutional regimes of authority, as well as "soft" regulatory mechanisms of markets and social norms. The course helps students understand the nature of law, policy, and regulation as social structures impacting practice in higher education, and provides a critical overview of current key areas of law, policy, and regulation influencing practice in higher education.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 5804. The Community College. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a critical analysis of the characteristics, scope, public policy issues, and impact of community and two-year colleges in the United States. Institutional types presented in this course include traditional community colleges, two-year colleges, junior colleges, proprietary schools, and branch campuses. The course introduces students to historical landmarks in the development of community colleges; describe and analyze the impact and implications of the current characteristics, status, and student demographics of community colleges including their role in increasing national college graduation rates. Community colleges' position and role in the higher education landscape are investigated with attention to their external organizational systems and financial structure including state systems, university systems, corporate structures, and other affiliations. A wide range of curricula issues are examined, including transfer articulation agreement, liberal arts, vocational/technical/career, continuing and digital education, and developmental/remedial programs.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 8093. Advanced Higher Education Research Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

The Ed.D. in higher education is a rigorous program that is built around aligned and integrated content related to the study of higher education and practice. Students in the program develop proficiency in research methods and data analysis through course work. This advanced research seminar is designed to provide students with structured preparation for writing a literature review and other competencies evaluated in the comprehensive examination. During the seminar, the development of a literature review and preparation for the doctoral comprehensive examination will be combined. Doctoral students will be enrolled in this seminar as they complete all required coursework for the program or it should be taken immediately following completion of coursework. The seminar serves as intensive groundwork for the comprehensive exam and all students will take the exam at the end of the advanced research seminar course. Given this intentional link to preparation for the comprehensive examination, the seminar will focus on developing students' ability to: Situate and define a chosen topic within the concepts and history of the field; Compare, contrast, and justify various research methods appropriate to investigate a practice-based research problem in higher education; and Critically synthesize the extant scholarly and practice-focused literature that informs topic.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 8101. Advanced Seminar on Higher Education Administration. 3 Credit Hours.

HIED 8101 is an advanced seminar focused on higher education administration as an area of professional practice and research. Course content examines the organization and administration of higher educational institutions and links the application of research and theory to practice. Learning objectives and outcomes for the course will be achieved by exploring the following topics: higher education as a social good; administrative environment of higher education; organizational factors related to how universities and colleges function; assessment competencies for administrators and leaders; diversity/equity and cultural issues; and future challenges and opportunities for professional practice and research in higher education. During the course, students will explore a variety of roles higher education administrators play on university/college campuses and seek to develop an understanding of how institutional cultures (and professionals' roles within those cultures) facilitate institutional effectiveness. Specifically, this course is designed to critically engage students' thinking about higher education institutions through discussing contemporary issues, problems, trends, administrative practices, leadership and post-secondary opportunities. An initial brief review of current and lingering challenges of higher education in the United Sates will help ground the course.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 8102. Higher Education Economics and Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides doctoral students with a comprehensive overview of economics and finance issues in higher education. The premise of this course is that in today's increasingly demanding higher education environment, with challenges such as budget cuts, rising institutional costs, tuition pressures, affordability, access, and so on, the successful higher education leader must possess at least a basic understanding of postsecondary education economics and finance. This course is designed to instill that knowledge, as well as to provide students with an opportunity to critically analyze the literature, issues, and recent trends, for purposes of both practical application and ongoing research. This course addresses theoretical and practical aspects of higher education administration. The theoretical components are based primarily on the readings. The practical aspects derive from the professor's experiences as a university administrator, from the experiences of members of the class and from reading about current events and cases.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 8103. Equity in Higher Education Policy and Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

This doctoral course on equity in higher education covers theory and best practices related to under-represented groups in higher education. This course will engage critical issues informed by research, policy and practice relating to access and equity in higher education. Special attention will be given to the ways in which race, gender, class, and the intersection of these social identities influence equity considerations in higher education. The course will specifically examine what it takes structurally and institutionally to enroll and transition traditionally marginalized students to post-secondary education. Focal areas will include: pre-college programs and policy created and designed to assist these students and connecting access and equity programs as partners with institutions of higher learning. Course participants will gain more knowledge about research on equity issues and the practices necessary to help students successfully navigate postsecondary opportunities.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 8104. Seminar on Theory in Higher Education and Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar is designed to provide doctoral students a general understanding of (1) what theory is and how it guides scholarly research and effective administrative practice in higher education, and (2) major theoretical perspectives, frameworks, and paradigms that inform higher education research and practice. The course is not meant as an exhaustive survey of all theory relevant to higher education. Rather, the course is intended as an intensive seminar to help students develop the skill of identifying, understanding, and applying theory related to applied research and practice. The following broad questions guide the course: What are the differences between theories, paradigms, conceptual models and frameworks, and epistemologies in higher education? Why is theory important to higher education research and to practice? What are the differences between "micro" and "macro" or "meta" theory? When is each appropriate or helpful in research and practice in higher education? How do we employ theory in research and how does the role of theory differ between qualitative and quantitative methodologies? Where and how does theory appear in a dissertation proposal?

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 8262. Advanced Practice-Based Qualitative Research in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This doctoral course is intended to provide a forum for advancing qualitative research strategies in the practice of higher education. The course extends the study of foundational philosophies, standpoints and uses of qualitative inquiry. Designed to help doctoral students in higher education develop a critical understanding of the various considerations and stages of qualitative research, this course includes the development of researchable questions, understanding theoretical and conceptual frameworks, and using methodological strategies such as data collection and analysis. Course readings, assignments, discussions, and learning activities will expose students to qualitative studies in the higher education literature. In doing so, the course aims to prepare students for qualitative approaches that may be part of their dissertation research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIED 9995. Master's Capstone in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, students completing a master's degree in higher education will work with an advisor to construct a capstone project. Drawing on the program's core ideas students will complete a summative project in which they apply these ideas to a real-world problem in the field. The final product for the course will include a written document summarizing this work.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Contacts

Program Web Address:

http://education.temple.edu/higher-education/doctoral

Department Information:

Higher Education Program

College of Education

1301 Cecil B. Moore Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19122-6091

educate@temple.edu

215-204-0999

Submission Address for Application Materials:

http://apply.temple.edu/coe

Department Contacts:

Admissions:

Office of Enrollment Management

educate@temple.edu

215-204-0999