College of Public Health

The College of Public Health is a global leader in the discovery, dissemination, and integration of health-related research and practice. We prepare future generations of professionals through an intellectual environment that incorporates interdisciplinary collaboration, critical thinking, and innovation to instill a commitment to ethical practice and lifelong learning. Exemplary research, teaching, and service are informed by our engagement with professional and community, regional, national, and global partners.

The College of Public Health engages in exciting, innovative research and supports talented, committed researchers. Investigations focus on medical interventions, social and behavioral inquiries, and animal and basic science. Inquiries are frequently interdisciplinary, crossing departmental and collegial lines, and draw on resources from across the University. The college's research mission entails

  • increasing faculty productivity in grants and published research;
  • encouraging faculty to seek research funds creatively, from such non-governmental sources as corporations and foundations;
  • promoting collaborative research;
  • developing a research infrastructure supported by best practices and outstanding staff;
  • creating students' awareness of faculty research and opportunities for research assistantships;
  • providing research opportunities for students; and
  • ensuring sufficient support to train faculty, students, administrators, and staff in the uses of new technologies.

The College of Public Health is also committed to excellence in fieldwork and clinical education. We believe that academic preparation must be complemented with a well-designed and mentored real-world experience that transforms classroom and laboratory learning into a dynamic, field-based demonstration of professional attitudes, skills, and abilities. Our students benefit from the college’s location in a metropolitan area filled with diverse and highly regarded health care, human services, and other non-medical agencies promoting health of individuals and communities. Our network of partnering agencies includes top-rated hospitals and rehabilitation centers, wellness clinics, state and federal government agencies, public and private schools, community health and human services agencies, research centers, and private practice offices. Field/clinical education can also begin on campus at clinics and research centers operated by  departments in the College of Public Health, through placements with intercollegiate athletics, and at Temple University Hospital.

As noted, graduate students in many of the College of Public Health's degree programs engage in required clinical/field education experiences at facilities both on and off the University's campuses. Many of these placements may require the student to have personal health insurance. Additionally, many require a criminal background check, Act 33/34 clearances, and perhaps a drug screen. Failure to maintain personal health insurance or the results of background clearances may limit and potentially eliminate placement options for students. This, in turn, can result in an inability to meet graduation requirements. The college cannot ensure clinical field placements if a student fails to meet the requirements or maintain health insurance. Additionally, conviction of a misdemeanor, felony, or felonious or illegal act may prevent a student from becoming credentialed and/or licensed to practice in certain professions. Applicants are encouraged to review the requirements for the particular program in which they are interested, as well as the licensure/credentialing rules in the state(s) in which they are interested in working to review their eligibility.

In Fall 2015, the College of Public Health introduced a common College Core course requirement for all incoming graduate students. The course, HRPR 5001 Current and Emerging Issues in Public Health and Health Professions, is completely online and designed such that students can complete the modules at their own pace over the course of their degree program. Tuition is not charged for the course since it carries no credit. However, it is a required pass/fail course, and students will not be eligible for graduation unless the course is completed. The course requires graduate students to complete a set of six learning modules that address core elements of health, including guiding principles, practices, and guidelines. Students then have the option to select an additional six modules from a menu of modules – currently 12 in number while new modules are being developed. Each module includes a video presentation, PowerPoint slides, additional resources, and a short quiz. A minimum grade of 80% on each module is required to pass the course. Program directors and faculty advisors work closely with students to explain the modules, discuss appropriate timing for their completion, and monitor progress towards completion before graduation.

Ultimately, our diverse population of students and highly recognized faculty seek to enhance the quality of life for all.

Graduate Faculty

William Aaronson, Associate Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Sarah Bauerle Bass, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Kristin Berg, Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Katherine Bevans, Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Tulane University.

Donna Coffman, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Bradley N. Collins, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton.

Jeffrey N. Draine, Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Levent Dumenci, Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Karin Eyrich-Garg, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis.

Jay S. Fagan, Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Columbia University.

Jennifer Orlet Fisher, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.

Michael T. Halpern, Associate Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; M.D., University of Michigan Medical School.

Chantelle Hart, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.

Alice J. Hausman, Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton.

Carolina Hausmann-Stabile, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Washington University.

Shivayogi V. Hiremath, Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Matthew Bryant Hudson, Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Florida-Gainesville.

Cheryl A. Hyde, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Jennifer K. Ibrahim, Associate Professor, Department of Health Services Administration and Policy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.

Larry D. Icard, Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Columbia University.

John Jeka, Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University.

Emily Keshner, Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ed.D., Columbia University.

Martha Y. Kubik, Professor, Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

Richard Lauer, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.

Stephen J. Lepore, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of California Irvine.

Edwin Maas, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., San Diego State University.

Nadine Martin, Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Temple University.

Omar Martinez, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; J.D., Indiana University.

Heather Murphy, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Guelph.

Miguel Muñoz-Laboy, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Dr.P.H., Columbia University.

Bernie Sue Newman, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Joon Young Park, Associate Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.

Elizabeth A. Pfeiffer, Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University.

James J. Reilly, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Jin-Sook Roh, Assistant Professor (Teaching/Instructional), Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Nancy L. Rothman, Professor, Department of Nursing, College of Public Health; Ed.D., Temple University.

Scott E. Rutledge, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Washington.

Michael L. Sachs, Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Florida State University.

Mark Salzer, Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

David B. Sarwer, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Loyola University Chicago.

Laura Siminoff, Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University.

Gretchen A. Snethen, Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Indiana University.

Gerry A. Stefanatos, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Public Health; D.Phil., Oxford University.

Christopher Thompson, Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., University of Illinois.

Heather M. Traino, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

Carole Tucker, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo.

Robert C. Whitaker, Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; M.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

W. Geoffrey Wright, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health; Ph.D., Brandeis University.

Marsha Zibalese Crawford, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, College of Public Health; D.S.W., Howard University.