Social and Behavioral Sciences, M.P.H.

COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH

About the Program

The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers the Master of Public Health in Social and Behavioral Sciences. The program has a strong focus on addressing the behavioral, social, and cultural factors related to individual and population health and health disparities over the life course, as well as the social and behavioral aspects of community health, health communication, program implementation and evaluation, and health education. Research and practice in this area contribute to the development, administration, and evaluation of programs in public health, which promote and sustain healthy lives for individuals and communities. The M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences is a terminal, professional degree that prepares students to design, implement, and evaluate interventions that are directed toward identified public health problems in communities. This cognate specialization aims to prepare public health practitioners to identify and assess the needs of populations; plan, implement, and evaluate programs to address those needs; and ensure that the needs of diverse populations are met to improve their overall health status.

Time Limit for Degree Completion: 4 years

Campus Location: Main and online (beginning in Fall 2017). Some required and elective courses for the on-campus program may also be offered online.

Full-Time/Part-Time Status: Students can complete the degree program through evening classes and online courses. Full-time students usually complete the program within two academic years. Part-time students usually take three to four years to complete their degree.

Interdisciplinary Study: Interdisciplinary M.P.H. coursework, research, and interactions with students and faculty in other departments are encouraged to give students as broad a perspective as possible to excel in the complex, diverse, and dynamic state of public health. Through associations with the Center for Obesity Research and Education, the Health Behavior and Research Clinic, the Risk Communication Laboratory, and the Social and Behavioral Health Interventions Laboratory, among others, students have access to over 100 faculty at Temple University and additional regional scholars who are actively involved in programs, research, and teaching in public health.

Six dual M.P.H. degree programs are currently offered in addition to the single-degree M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences:

  • D.M.D./M.P.H. with Temple University's Kornberg School of Dentistry

  • D.O./M.P.H. with the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

  • D.P.M./M.P.H. with the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine
  • J.D./M.P.H. with Temple University's Beasley School of Law

  • M.D./M.P.H. with the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University

  • M.S.W./M.P.H. with the Temple University School of Social Work

Affiliation(s): Locally, the program has long-standing research affiliations with The Food Trust, Fox Chase Cancer Center, the Health Federation of Philadelphia, NORTH, Inc. (managers of the Philadelphia WIC program), the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, the Public Health Management Corporation (PHMC) and its subsidiaries, the School District of Philadelphia, and many other community health agencies.

Study Abroad: Depending on faculty availability, study abroad opportunities are offered during the summer and are open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

Accreditation: The M.P.H. is fully accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). Achieving accreditation in 1985, Temple's M.P.H. program is one of the longest established accredited M.P.H. programs in the country.

Areas of Specialization: In addition to the program in Social and Behavioral Sciences, the College of Public Health offers the M.P.H. in four specialty fields of study: 

  • Applied Biostatistics (APBS)
  • Environmental Health (ENVH)
  • Epidemiology (EPID)
  • Health Policy and Management (HPM)

A certificate in Global Health is available to all students in the M.P.H. program. Students are able to complete this transcripted concentration by utilizing their three elective courses for Global Health classes.

Job Prospects: Graduates with an M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences have positions in a wide range of health-related settings, including state and local public health departments, community-based organizations, voluntary health agencies, health maintenance organizations, hospitals, clinics, schools, and work sites. Graduates are employed as health educators and counselors, evaluation specialists, marketing specialists, prevention specialists, project directors, research and community health program managers, HIV/AIDS coordinators, infection control coordinators, adjunct faculty, and consultants. Virtually all students are placed within three to six months of graduation.

Licensure: Students who complete an M.P.H. at Temple University may be eligible to sit for the Certification in Public Health (CPH) exam and the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam.

Non-Matriculated Student Policy: Non-matriculated students are required to speak with an advisor and to obtain the permission of the professor before registering for classes. If accepted to the program, a maximum of three courses may be applied toward the degree program. Exceptions to this policy relate to formal certificate programs.

Financing Opportunities: The Graduate School awards fellowships on a competitive basis only to students with outstanding academic records who are admitted to Temple University for the Fall term. Applicants who wish to be considered for fellowships must apply no later than January 26 for consideration for the Fall term. The department's Admissions Committee nominates outstanding students for these awards, but the Graduate Board's Fellowship Committee makes all award decisions.

Limited Teaching and Research Assistantships are available to M.P.H. students in the College of Public Health. The Graduate School website details levels of support, benefits, and the terms and conditions of these types of graduate student support at http://www.temple.edu/grad/finances/. Assistantships are awarded on a term or annual basis. Students whose Fall applications are complete prior to or at the application deadline are reviewed for eligibility for Teaching Assistant (TA) positions. TAs may work up to 20 hours per week in any combination of teaching assignments made by the department and must meet the English Language Proficiency standards set by the University and the College. Students who hold Teaching or Research Assistantships are not permitted to hold other employment without the written prior approval of their advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Graduate School. To be considered for a TA or RA position, complete an application form that is sent to students upon admission to the M.P.H. program. The completed application must be returned to publichealth@temple.edu to be considered.

Admission Requirements and Deadlines

Application Deadline:

Fall: March 1
Spring: November 1

All applicants to the M.P.H. program must apply via the Centralized Application Service for Public Health (SOPHAS). The system can be accessed at https://portal.sophas.org/. A supplemental application is also required to be submitted directly to Temple University at http://www.temple.edu/apply/common/appcheck.asp. Late applications may be considered for admission.

Applicants should check their application status on the SOPHAS portal often and inquire directly of SOPHAS about receipt of materials. For other questions, please contact Theresa White, Senior Graduate Advisor, at theresawhite@temple.edu or 215-204-5105.

Letters of Reference:
Number Required: 3

From Whom: Letters of recommendation, which are completed electronically through the SOPHAS system, should be obtained from college/university faculty members familiar with academic competence. If the applicant has been out of school for a long time, please ensure that letters are from professional colleagues and that they address academic abilities, such as writing and research.

Coursework Required for Admission Consideration: Applicants' files are reviewed for undergraduate coursework in mathematics and/or statistics, social science, and writing.

Bachelor's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A baccalaureate degree is required.

Statement of Goals: In 500 to 1,000 words, address the following items:

  • What are your interests in Public Health, and why are you planning to pursue an M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences?
  • What are your future career goals, and what have you done either academically or professionally to guide your interest in Public Health and to begin preparation toward your career goals?
  • Are there any exceptional circumstances related to previous academic performance that you would like the Admissions Committee to consider?

Standardized Test Scores:
GRE: Required. While the program takes a portfolio approach to admissions, standardized tests provide important insight into quantitative and verbal abilities. Minimum scores around the 50th percentile on the verbal and quantitative sections are preferred but not required.

Standardized tests considered in lieu of the GRE include DAT, GMAT, MCAT, OAT, and PCAT. The LSAT, which is also considered for some M.P.H. specialties, is not accepted when applying for Applied Biostatistics or Epidemiology.

TOEFL: 79 iBT or 550 PBT minimum.

Clearances: The M.P.H. programs require students to complete clinical/field education experiences at facilities both on and off Temple University’s campuses. These placements may require criminal background checks, Act 33/34 clearances, and perhaps a drug screen. The results of these requirements may limit and potentially eliminate placement options, which can, in turn, result in the student's inability to meet graduation requirements.

Resume: Current resume required.

Transfer Credit: Graduate credits earned through other M.P.H. programs accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) may be transferred into Temple's M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences program. The credits must be equivalent to coursework offered at Temple, and the grade must be a "B" or better in order to transfer. The Director of Graduate Studies approves the transfer of credits based on a review of course materials provided by the student. The maximum number of credits a student may transfer is 9.

Test Waivers: Graduates with a terminal degree from a U.S. medical school, foreign-trained physicians who have obtained licensure to practice in the United States, and those with Ph.D.’s may have the GRE requirement waived.

Program Requirements

General Program Requirements:
Number of Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 45

Required Courses:

Core Courses
ENVH 5103Environmental Health3
EPBI 5002Biostatistics3
EPBI 5101Fundamentals of Epidemiology3
or EPBI 5201 Epidemiological Research Methods I
HPM 5006Political and Economic Aspects of Health3
HPM 8112Public Health Program Evaluation3
HRPR 5001Current and Emerging Issues in Public Health and Health Professions0
SBS 5001Fundamentals of Public Health3
SBS 5102Theoretical Foundations of Health Behavior3
SBS 8105Health Communication3
or SBS 5009 Risk Communication and Public Health
SBS 8111Public Health Program Planning3
Specialty Elective3
Select one of the following:
Social Epidemiology
Understanding Stress and Change
Health Psychology
Additional Electives9
M.P.H. Fieldwork Experience
SBS 9289MPH Fieldwork I3
SBS 9389MPH Fieldwork II3
Total Credit Hours45

Internship: An internship is required as part of a student's M.P.H. fieldwork.

Culminating Events:
Fieldwork Practicum:
The M.P.H. fieldwork practicum is the capstone experience of the M.P.H. educational program and takes place over two terms during the student’s final year in the program. The fieldwork practicum requires a student to synthesize and integrate the knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in a placement that approximates some aspect of professional practice. The internship or practicum experience occurs in a public health agency or under the supervision of a faculty preceptor. The M.P.H. fieldwork experience is required by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), the accrediting body of all U.S. schools of public health, for completion of the M.P.H. degree. In addition, this culminating experience provides the student with the opportunity to develop expertise in a topic area and to contribute original and independent observations to a body of knowledge.

For the culminating experience to fulfill the requirements of SBS 9289 and SBS 9389, M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences students are expected to complete a fieldwork experience, which enables them to:

  • Explain the contributions of social and behavioral sciences to public health.

  • Describe health problems, including their social, cultural, environmental, and behavioral causes.

  • Ensure that social and behavioral science theories and concepts are used in planning and evaluating public health programs.

  • Use behavioral science and health promotion methods in planning/evaluating public health programs.

  • Apply ethical principles to public health program planning, implementation, and evaluation.

  • Identify multiple targets and levels of intervention for social and behavioral science programs and/or policies, including individual, family, network, organizational, community, policy, physical environment, and culture.

A final paper is the required deliverable for the M.P.H. fieldwork requirement. Students must also demonstrate their proficiency and the application of theory and principles in the paper and demonstrate mastery of the required competencies during the oral defense. The evaluation of the M.P.H. fieldwork practicum experience, therefore, is integrated into the culminating experience requirement.

Courses

SBS 5001. Fundamentals of Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course encompasses historical and sociocultural approaches to understanding public health and bioethics. Emphasis is on understanding public health systems from the dawn of history to the 21st century and the evolution of bioethical issues including the application of bioethical principles, regulations, and strategies in research and health practice. This seminar emphasizes the integration of conceptual and experiential learning. This is reflected in the course design and in teaching and learning processes.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5004. Understanding Stress and Change. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the impact of stress on physical and emotional health and quality of life. It focuses on the causes, types, and physiology of stress and stress reduction methods, including relaxation, biofeedback, fear control, cognitive restructuring, and social psychological interventions in community settings.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5005. International Health Studies Abroad. 6 Credit Hours.

Students learn to articulate a historical and cultural understanding of the Costa Rican approach to health and medical care, to identify the major health concerns of the Costa Rican population in rural and urban settings and the major strides taken to improve health, to conduct limited fieldwork with rural communities in teams of 3 to 4 persons or conduct community health field research among the graduate students, and to write a professional paper and presentation on one of the health issues in Costa Rica based on their experience there. While previous Spanish language proficiency is not required, some Spanish language ability is essential for students to gain the maximum understanding during the program. Therefore, students during the first two weeks of the program take intensive Spanish language training in Costa Rica at the Institute for Central American Development Studies (ICADS). The third week involves travel to other regions within Costa Rica to examine different health conditions depending on the year's topics. During the fourth and fifth weeks, students live and work in rural communities and help to facilitate health education workshops on different activities such as: diabetes, nutrition, HIV/AIDS prevention education, women's health, child health care issues, first aid education, fitness and exercise, and backyard gardening.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5008. Seminar in International Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and models of public health preparedness and response for all hazards emergency management. It will enable health care and allied health professionals, public health professionals, and emergency responders to work together to plan and respond effectively to both natural and man made disasters. The course will introduce students to the identified core competencies of emergency health preparedness for public health professionals which include: functional roles, communication, resource identification, problem solving, and evaluation. The issues of mental health and special populations will be introduced in an emergency management context. Students will utilize problem based learning by analyzing actual disaster events and applying the theories, principles, and practice of preparedness, response, mitigation, and recovery.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5009. Risk Communication and Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to demonstrate how health communication professionals can create and implement risk communication plans related to either possible or actual public health hazards (anything that can cause morbidity or mortality). This course focuses on risk communication within the context of terrorism, infectious disease outbreaks, and health problems that occur because of natural disasters. It will include core principles of risk communication, examine special challenges of risk communication with diverse audiences, and prepare students to create a crisis and emergency risk communication plan.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5015. Public Health Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores nutrition as a science and platform for public health promotion and disease prevention. The fundamental contribution of nutrition to public health as well as the potential of food and nutrition policy, programs, and interventions to reduce risk and promote health are examined.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5102. Theoretical Foundations of Health Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Theories of decision-making related to health behavior. Emphasis on the dynamic interaction of attitudes, values, situational factors and other factors that influence health promoting and health damaging behavior.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5104. Models for Teaching Health and Patient Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This course deals with the description and application of teaching models used in health and patient education in communities, health care systems, and schools. There is an emphasis on creating learning environments, communication skills, tailoring for diverse populations, and teaching techniques.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5202. Man-Made Disasters: Radiological, Chemical & Biological Terrorism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and models of public health preparedness, mitigation, and evaluation in the context of man-made disasters, including radiological, chemical and biological incidents. The course addresses identified core competencies of emergency preparedness for public health professionals that include disaster management, risk assessment, risk communication, governmental resources, functional roles, surveillance, and preparedness evaluation. Man-made disasters are looked at in a historical, environmental, and psychological context in order to elucidate the role of public health in man-made disaster preparedness and evaluation. In addition, the role of cultural competency and the needs of special populations are addressed. Public perception of risk and media views of man-made disasters are explored.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 5500. Seminar in Current Issues in Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminar topics rotate to address current issues in public health research, policy and practice.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SBS 8001. Research Methods in Public Health. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

This course examines how to develop and test models, formulate research problem statements and hypotheses, and implement and evaluate research designs and methods of data collection in public health research. It concentrates on fundamental concepts in research design and measurement that help prepare the student to plan and implement theoretically informed and methodologically sound scientific studies in public health and to critically evaluate and discuss public health research. The course emphasizes ethical and practical methods of studying and evaluating causal relations (efficacy and internal validity); determining generalizability of observations (effectiveness, external and ecological validity); and accurate and reliable measuring and conceptualizing of variables (construct validity). In addition, it covers systematic literature searches and randomized controlled trials, which are both increasingly important methods for conducting research in public health.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 8002. Research Seminar in Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a research seminar on linkages between theory and research in social and behavioral health studies. It is required for Ph.D. students prior to taking the preliminary examinations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 8004. Understanding Stress and Change. 3 Credit Hours.

The course involves becoming aware of situations, people, and words that trigger alarm reactions. Students complete a profile for the course to help them understand the causes of stress, how the body reacts to excessive stress, and symptoms that exist because of stress levels. Students gain awareness of areas that affect control of life situations and how they affect overall energy efficiency. They also become aware of how they manage time and social situations. They learn about the influence of exercise, sleep, nutrition, and relaxation training on health status and quality of life. They learn about their level of job or occupational stress and variables that affect job-related stressors. They become aware of how thoughts and perceptions affect the body's response to the stressors faced each day. They become more competent in managing all aspects of life as it relates to stress reactivity. They may gain confidence and have more energy, greater control and fewer symptoms following the implementation of the many ideas, concepts and recommendations that are offered. They learn to put energy into areas that are controllable and to let go of situations that are now "history" and in the past. They learn how to have a more balanced and logical view of stress and its relationship to health status and quality of life.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 8006. Addictions and Dependencies. 3 Credit Hours.

Social, psychological, cultural, clinical, and biological factors associated with addictions and dependencies, including the use of psychoactive drugs and lifestyle behaviors, are covered. Reviewed are prevention and treatment approaches based on the causes and correlates of addictions and dependencies.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 8009. Health Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Through class lecture, readings, and discussions, students will learn how characteristics of persons (e.g., personality, behavior, coping, and biological reactivity) and their environments (e.g., stress and social support) influence health outcomes at the individual and population level. In addition, the course examines the potential of health psychology to explain population-level health problems and to ameliorate public health problems through behavioral and community-based interventions.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 8018. Obesity: From Genes to Junk Food. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will broadly explore the etiology, treatment, and prevention of obesity from a multilevel systems perspective. Genetic, epigenetic, physiological, and psycho-social influences will be considered at the level of the individual. These influences will also be considered within family, school, and work-site contexts. Macro-level influences include government policies and programs, media, food industry influences, and community resources. Critical thinking skills and scholarly exchange will be emphasized through classroom discussion and weekly presentations/critiques of emerging science in each topic area.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
EPBI 5101|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 5101|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently
OR EPBI 5201|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 5201|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently.

SBS 8105. Health Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines levels of communication processes and effects in 1) intrapersonal health communication related to personality, attitudes, cognitive style, and quality of life; 2) interpersonal communication in the patient-caregiver relationships, including dynamics of stress, conflict, and social support; 3) organizational communication in health-care settings; 4) mass communication processes, including media campaigns to promote good health and disease prevention; and 5) risk communication across settings and strategies.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 8111. Public Health Program Planning. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers program planning in public health practice. It analyzes national health objectives and their applications at the state and community levels. One emphasis is on program planning as a change strategy to alter knowledge, attitudes, and health behavior to achieve positive health outcomes.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(EPBI 5101|Minimum Grade of B-|May be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 5101|Minimum Grade of B-|May be taken concurrently
OR EPBI 5201|Minimum Grade of B-|May be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 5201|Minimum Grade of B-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (EPBI 5002|Minimum Grade of B-|May be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 5002|Minimum Grade of B-|May be taken concurrently)
AND (SBS 5102|Minimum Grade of B-|May be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 5102|Minimum Grade of B-|May be taken concurrently).

SBS 8307. Systematic Reviews. 3 Credit Hours.

Systematic reviews are essential tools for health care workers, researchers, consumers, and policymakers who need to keep abreast of the accumulation of knowledge within their field. Systematic reviews provide more objective evaluation of the evidence than has been possible with traditional narrative reviews, and so can help resolve uncertainty and point toward promising future directions in research and practice. When appropriate, meta-analyses can help increase the precision of estimates regarding treatment effects and way to improve treatments. For example, identification of subgroups of individuals most (or least) likely to benefit from treatment can generate new questions to be addressed.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 9083. Readings and Conference in Public Health. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

This is an advanced tutorial in public health with an appropriate faculty member. Note: Registration requires a written contract with the supervising faculty member and approval of the student's advisor and of the Director of Graduate Programs.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SBS 9189. MPH Capstone Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar is required of M.P.H. students during final year of study. The seminar includes integration of coursework and practice skills to develop a fieldwork project or internship in a public health agency.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SBS 9289. MPH Fieldwork I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course entails a fieldwork project or internship in a public health agency. It includes seminars, oral and written reports of progress, and joint supervision by a preceptor and faculty member.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 9389. MPH Fieldwork II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an evaluation of the fieldwork project or internship using a full range of research methodologies. Data are collected, analyzed, and reported in a comprehensive final report. Oral and/or poster presentations are presented to public health organizations. The course includes a final oral defense of the project or internship.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SBS 9991. Independent Project in Environmental Health. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Under the direction of an appropriate graduate faculty member, students tie together their coursework in a project that poses a problem, gathers data to help analyze the problem, and provides a solution. Note: Enrollment must be approved by the student's advisor and the Director of Graduate Programs.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SBS 9994. Preliminary Examinations. 1 Credit Hour.

This course supports preparation for taking the preliminary examinations in the Health Policy and Socila and Behavioral Sciencs PhD. programs. To enroll, students must have completed all required coursework for the Ph.D. and obtain the approval of the Ph.D. Program Director. Students must be enrolled to take the required preliminary examinations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SBS 9996. Masters Res in Pub Hlth. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is limited to students who have chosen to fulfill the master's degree by writing a thesis.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SBS 9998. Dissertation Proposal Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course supports preparation of the dissertation proposal. The course is required for students who have passed the preliminary examinations for their programs and who have not yet defended the dissertation proposal.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SBS 9999. Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

This course is limited to Ph.D. candidates who have completed and defended a dissertation proposal that is filed with the Graduate School by the last day to add a course in the semester. Continuous registration in 9999 fall and spring is required until the dissertation is successfully defended.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
Student Attribute restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: Dissertation Writing Student

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

Contacts

Program Web Address:

https://cph.temple.edu/socialbehavioral/programs-offered/graduate/public-health-mph

Department Information:

Dept. of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Ritter Hall Annex, 9th Floor (004-09)

1301 Cecil B. Moore Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19122-6005

publichealth@temple.edu

215-204-8726

Submission Address for Application Materials:

https://portal.sophas.org/

Department Contacts:

Admissions:

Theresa White

Senior Graduate Advisor

theresawhite@temple.edu

215-204-5105

Director of Graduate Studies:

Bradley N. Collins, Ph.D.

collinsb@temple.edu

215-204-2849

Chairperson:

Stephen Lepore, Ph.D.

stephen.lepore@temple.edu

215-204-8726