Philosophy, Ph.D.

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS

About the Program

Temple’s Department of Philosophy has strengths in several areas of philosophical study. The department has a rich history and continuing presence in the field of aesthetics as Monroe Beardsley and John Fisher were in the department for many years. The department also has expertise in European philosophy, epistemology, feminist philosophy, philosophy of mind, philosophy of race, and philosophy of science.

The Ph.D. program is designed to provide students with a breadth of knowledge in Philosophy while emphasizing depth of knowledge through intensive work on particular philosophical issues of interest to the student. The program stresses early development of professional writing standards and oral skills. Ph.D. students are generally given the opportunity to teach courses under the guidance of the department's Teaching Mentoring Program.

Time Limit for Degree Completion: 7 years

Campus Location: Main, Center City

Full-Time/Part-Time Status: Students complete the degree program through classes largely offered before 4:30 p.m. The degree program can be completed on a full- or part-time basis.

Interdisciplinary Study: The program permits students in the Ph.D. program to take a limited number of courses in non-Philosophy programs at Temple. Many students take courses in African American Studies, Art History, English, and Psychology. Students may also earn the Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies in conjunction with the Ph.D. in Philosophy.

Affiliation(s): The Greater Philadelphia Consortium provides expanded course options for graduate work in Philosophy. Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program at Temple may take graduate courses at the University of Pennsylvania and Villanova University.

Job Prospects: Graduates typically find employment in college or university teaching and research. A departmental placement committee assists students with the job search.

Non-Matriculated Student Policy: Non-matriculated students may register for courses after an interview with the Director of Graduate Studies, at which time they should present academic transcripts. Credit toward a subsequent degree program at Temple University is limited to 9 credits.

Financing Opportunities: Support is available in the form of University Fellowships, Teaching Assistantships, and Academic Internships. University Fellows are typically supported with a stipend and full tuition remission for four years, teaching for two of those years. Teaching Assistants are typically required to teach introductory philosophy courses or recitation sections in large courses taught by professors. They receive a stipend and full tuition remission. All Ph.D. applications are automatically considered for financial aid.

Admission Requirements and Deadlines

Application Deadline:

Fall: January 15

Admission is competitive and determined only once a year. Applications to the Ph.D. program are automatically considered for financial aid.

APPLY ONLINE to this graduate program. For details on how to apply to the Ph.D. program in Philosophy, visit http://www.cla.temple.edu/philosophy/graduate-program/information-for-applicants/.

Letters of Reference:
Number Required: 3

From Whom: Letters of recommendation should be obtained from college/university faculty members familiar with your academic competence.

Coursework Required for Admission Consideration: Applicants typically have majored or minored in Philosophy for their bachelor’s degree.

Master's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A master's degree is not required.

Bachelor's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A baccalaureate degree in Philosophy is standard, although not mandatory, for admission into the program.

Statement of Goals: In approximately 500 to 1,000 words, address your interest in Temple's program, your research goals, your future career goals, and your academic and research achievements.

Standardized Test Scores:
GRE: Required. Scores are typically in the 65-75% range on the verbal and quantitative sections.

TOEFL: 105 iBT or 620 PBT minimum

Writing Sample: The writing sample should demonstrate your ability to research and write a scholarly paper. The paper should be 15-20 pages in length and fully referenced according to a professional, scholarly style manual. It should be in the field of Philosophy or a closely related area.

Program Requirements

General Program Requirements:
Number of Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 42

Required Courses:

Core Courses
Course in Epistemology/Metaphysics3
Course in History of Philosophy - Ancient3
Course in History of Philosophy - Kant/Hegel3
Course in History of Philosophy - 17th/18th Century3
Course in Values/Ethics3
Electives 121
Non-Didactic Courses6
Preliminary Examination Preparation
Pre-Dissertation Research
Dissertation Research
Total Credit Hours42
1

Of the 21 elective credits, 9 credits may be taken in cognate disciplines, subject to determination by the Director of Graduate Studies.

For a current copy of the Departmental Graduate Handbook, which lists all requirements, contact Sonia Lawson, the Graduate Coordinator, at 215-204-1742 or slawson@temple.edu.

Language Examination: Students must pass a written proficiency examination in French, German, or Ancient Greek. Other languages may be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies, provided the student makes a compelling case that the language in question is useful for dissertation work.

Culminating Events:
Dissertation Advising:
It is the student’s responsibility, in consultation with her/his primary advisor, to assemble three advisory committees. It is best to form a committee that gives the student a variety of sympathetic but critical perspectives on the project. Three distinct committees, which are largely composed of the same members, must be in place at different phases of the proposal and dissertation processes. The committee guidelines are outlined below:

  1. Proposal Advisory Committee:  This committee guides the student through the preparation and defense of her/his dissertation proposal. The Proposal Advisory Committee is composed of three Graduate Faculty members from the Philosophy Department. One member is named Chair. Additional members from outside the Philosophy Department may be included with written approval from the Chair and the Graduate School. Normally, the Proposal Advisory Committee becomes the Doctoral Advisory Committee upon approval of the proposal.
  2. Doctoral Advisory Committee:  This committee guides the student through all stages of the dissertation. The Doctoral Advisory Committee must be in compliance with University guidelines as prescribed by the Graduate School. The committee must be composed of at least three Temple University Graduate Faculty members, two of whom must be from the Philosophy Department. A member of the committee from the Philosophy Department is named Chair.
    If changes must be made in the Doctoral Advisory Committee after the student is elevated to candidacy, such changes must be approved by the Chair of the Advisory Committee and the Graduate School. A "Request for Change in Dissertation Committee" form, found at www.temple.edu/grad/forms, must be filed.
  3. Dissertation Examining Committee:  This committee consists of the Doctoral Advisory Committee plus one Graduate Faculty member from outside Temple’s Philosophy Department OR one Outside Examiner. The Outside Examiner may be from another academic institution; should not have been a part of the dissertation writing process or the Doctoral Advisory Committee; and must be approved at least two weeks prior to the defense. The Chair of the Dissertation Examining Committee must be a member of the Temple University Graduate Faculty, but may not be the Chair of the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee. The Chair of the Dissertation Examining Committee must be identified when the defense is posted through the Graduate School.

Preliminary Examinations:
The preliminary examinations consist of writing original research papers in:

  1. History of Philosophy, defined as Ancient Philosophy through the end of the 19th Century; and 
  2. Contemporary Philosophy, emphasizing constructivist, analytical, or other philosophical approaches to a particular issue.

Students may submit either the historical or the contemporary paper first. These papers are typically developed from a student's best coursework papers and are generally revised through consultation with the professors who originally evaluated them. The papers should aspire to meet the standards of publication. NOTE: A successful course paper typically requires considerable work to become a successful preliminary paper. Preliminary examination essays should show both a mastery of relevant primary and secondary literature and put forward ideas that are an original contribution to the field. Graduate students are strongly encouraged to consult with faculty several months before their preliminary examination essays are due.

The first Preliminary Examination Paper is due by 4:00 p.m. on the second Monday in October at the beginning of the student's second year, and the second paper submission is due by 4:00 p.m. on the second Monday in October at the beginning of the student's third year. Papers must be prepared for blind review and submitted both online and in hard copy (four copies) to the Graduate Secretary. Papers should include an abstract of not more than 200 words.

The papers are evaluated by two faculty members. In close cases, a third reader is consulted. Papers are graded High Pass/Pass/Low Pass/Fail. Students receiving a Low Pass are on notice that their performance is not up to the level expected for dissertation work. Second-year students who fail a preliminary examination resubmit (along with their second preliminary examination) in the October of their third year. Third-year students who fail one or two preliminary examinations resubmit by 4:00 p.m. on the second Monday of the following February. Third-year students who fail a preliminary examination twice are dismissed from the program.

Students must be registered for at least one credit of PHIL 9994 Preliminary Examination Preparation in the terms in which they submit their preliminary examinations. Students who are required to resubmit their preliminary examinations must re-register for one credit hour of PHIL 9994 in the term in which the exam is to be resubmitted.

Dissertation Proposal:
The dissertation proposal is an opportunity for the student to develop and clearly articulate the project of the dissertation. The dissertation proposal has two components: written and oral. The written component should be 15-20 pages in length and include a statement of the problem, a critical literature review, and a sketch of how the student intends to address the philosophical problem(s) at hand. The student needs to make clear how the dissertation will be an original contribution to the field of philosophy. A detailed bibliography and chapter outline are also expected. The approved dissertation proposal serves as a contract between the student and her/his Doctoral Advisory Committee; the student agrees to complete the work outlined in the proposal under the guidance of the Doctoral Advisory Committee.

When the written component of the proposal is judged ready by the Proposal Advisory Committee, an oral examination date is set. At least two weeks before this examination, the defense is announced to the department faculty and at least two copies of the written proposal are made available in the Graduate Coordinator’s office.

The oral examination, which is conducted by the Proposal Advisory Committee, constitutes an opportunity for the student’s committee to make positive suggestions as well as to test the candidate’s preparedness. Other faculty may attend the oral examination and ask questions after the Proposal Advisory Committee has completed its questioning. The Proposal Advisory Committee decides, by majority vote, whether the candidate passes or fails the written and oral parts of the dissertation proposal.

Dissertation:
The dissertation should constitute a definitive and original contribution to the field of philosophy. It needs to show mastery of the relevant philosophical literature. The dissertation should be in the hands of the Dissertation Examining Committee by October 1 for December graduation and by March 1 for May graduation.

All Ph.D. students must formally and publicly defend their dissertations before the Dissertation Examining Committee. The candidate must submit the official, signed notice of the oral defense to the Graduate School 10 or more working days before the scheduled defense. A defense cannot be held without written confirmation of approval and receipt of the defense paperwork from the Graduate School.

The defense should be announced publicly and is open to all members of the University. During the defense, primary questioning is restricted to the members of the Dissertation Examining Committee. Then, Philosophy Department faculty members who have submitted written questions in advance may address the candidate. Lastly, other members of the Philosophy Department faculty may address the candidate. The Dissertation Examining Committee decides, by majority vote, whether the candidate passes or fails.

Courses

PHIL 5210. Special Topics in Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 5211. Intermediate Logic. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will go through the soundness and completeness proofs for a first-order deductive system (i.e., the kind used in intro logic). The main goal of the course will be to deepen the students' understanding of logic by acquainting them with these formal results. But we'll also try to spend a little time on some philosophical issues (e.g., what, if anything, does logic have to do with reasoning).

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5216. Philosophy of Science. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic issues in the current philosophy of science, and particularly various accounts of such key notations of science as hypotheses, confirmation, laws, causation, explanation, and theories.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5217. Feminist Epistemology and the Philosophy of Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the effects of gender on scientific creativity, method and decision making. Thomas Kuhn, in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), was one of the first to show that political, social and psychological factors affect scientific change. Feminist criticisms of science, developed over the last thirty years, are one way in which his views have been developed. We will examine cases from a wide range of sciences to see where, and how, gender influences scientific practice. The complex relations between gender, race, class and nationality will also be discussed in relation to these issues. Central questions of the course will be: How pervasive is gender bias in science? Can gender bias be eliminated, and is it desirable to do so? Does the reduction of gender bias require an increased representation of women in science? Can the popular view that science is objective, truth-seeking and progressive be maintained in the face of findings of gender bias? We will read from the work of Evelyn Fox Keller, Donna Haraway, Sandra Harding, Helen Longino, Alison Wylie and others.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5218. Philosophy of Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5220. Special Topics in Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 5221. Social and Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5222. Contemporary Ethical Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Issues in ethical theory that have come to prominence in the 20th century. Both meta-ethical issues (about the meaning and justification of ethical statements) and normative issues (about obligation, responsibility, and goodness) will be examined.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5223. Feminist Ethics and Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of feminism's contribution to ethics, political philosophy, and legal theory. Issues may include: the role of care versus that of justice in determining moral obligations; the nature and causes of women's oppression (including the difference between the sexual oppression experienced by white women and the additional forms of oppression to which women of color/third-world women are subject); pornography and prostitution; equality and difference; essentialism as it pertains to gender and race; feminist jurisprudence; postmodern feminism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5225. Metaethics. 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines the foundations of ethical value, including the metaphysics of ethical value, the semantics of ethical language, normativity, and the relation between kinds of value such as instrumental, final, intrinsic, and extrinsic as well as personal, ethical, moral, and prudential.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5226. Classics in Moral Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will introduce students to Greek ethical thought through seminal texts in this genre.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5229. Philosophy in Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected philosophical themes as they appear in classical and modern literature. Frequently the themes concern the "enlightenment project," "modernism," and their critics.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5230. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 5232. History of Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of major works in the history of aesthetics selected from such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Dewey, Bell, Collingwood, Beardsley, Langer, Dickie, Danto, and contemporary figures.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5233. Problems in Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5234. Philosophy of Music. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of philosophical issues concerning the nature and value of music, such as the nature of composition, performance, and appreciation of music, the varieties of musical meaning, the relation of music to the emotions, and the social importance of music.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5235. Classics in Moral Philosophy II. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the major works in the history of moral philosophy selected from among the writings of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Spinoza, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, Moore.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5240. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 5241. Theory of Knowledge. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of knowledge and belief. The specific subtopics involving them include truth, perception, innate ideas, justification, induction, the priori, mathematical knowledge and rationalism versus empiricism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5242. Metaphysics. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the most general features of the universe. Topics include the character of truth, the existence of abstract entities, the nature of persons, free will, the existence or non-existence of God, ontological commitment, the relation of philosophy to science, causation, modal properties, reality and appearance, and various forms of realism and anti-realism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5243. Philosophy of Law. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to philosophical problems arising in the examination of legal statements, including questions and theories about the nature of law itself, about legal responsibility and legal punishment, and about standards of fairness in settling legal disputes.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5244. Philosophy of the Mind. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the character of mental and psychological states. Specific issues may include the nature of persons, relations between natural and psychological sciences, action, mental content, and its relation to language.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5249. Ethics in Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of ethical issues generated by the application of scientific and technological advances to the preservation, destruction, and programming of human life. Topics may include: ethics of medical research, abortion, euthanasia, behavior control, allocation of scarce medical resources, and the ethics of patient-physician interaction.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5250. Topics in the Philosophy of Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines select topics in the philosophy of psychology such as philosophical treatments of the nature of cognition, perception, and sensation, as well as emotion, intention, action, and moral psychology.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 5251. Philosophy of Language. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of a number of theories of meaning and reference that have played a role in current philosophizing.  Also, it is has been said that many perennial philosophical issues are at bottom linguistic ones. To better evaluate this sort of claim, I hope we are able to allot time to study a selection of linguistic approaches to a variety of philosophical claims in areas such as epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and ethics. We will approach these topics from number of influential writings, both historical and contemporary.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5253. Philosophy of History. 3 Credit Hours.

Problems of historical knowledge, e.g., problems about the historian's claim to explain historical events (causation in history, reasons for actions, challenges to the objectivity of history) and problems about historical interpretation (including global interpretations of the historical process, such as Augustine's, Kant's, and Hegel's.)

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5268. Indian Philosophy: An Introduction. 3 Credit Hours.

Beginnings of Indian philosophical thinking in the hymns of Rig Veda and the upanishads and the major schools of Indian philosophy as they took shape during the next thousand years. The latter include samkhya, the Buddhist schools, the Vaiseskika, the Nyaya and the major schools of Vedanta. Issues in metaphysics, epistemology, and logic emphasized.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5269. Contemporary British and American Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 20th and 21st century English-speaking philosophy, varying according to instructor and semester.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5271. Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected European philosophers from Hegel to Bradley.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5272. Philosophy of Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to address central themes in philosophy of culture, such as philosophical problems raised by the notion of cultural conditions of possibility, the relation of mythic knowledge to scientific and philosophical knowledge, the role of signs and symbols in theories of culture, the philosophical significance of psychoanalysis, and the distinction between a philosophical anthropology and anthropological theory.  This course will be topical in nature, which means that it can be taken each year as different dimensions of the subject receive focus.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5273. Greek Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Interpretation and critical examination of the dialogues of Plato and the works of Aristotle.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5274. Pragmatism and American Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

American pragmatism and naturalism, with emphasis on Emerson, James, Peirce, Mead, Dewey, and contemporary pragmatists.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5275. British Empiricism. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 17th- and 18th-century philosophers such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Reid.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5276. Contemporary Continental Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Phenomenology and existentialism, with emphasis on such 20th century philosophers as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, Derrida, and other post-structuralists.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5277. Africana Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Africana philosophy is an area of philosophy that focuses on philosophy as it emerges out of the African Diaspora.  As such, it encompasses African philosophy, Afro-Caribbean and Afro-Latin American philosophy, African-American philosophy, and Africana critical race theory. Each semester's offering will be different. Sometimes the course will cover themes from just one or two of these areas, other times the instructor may choose to present a "survey" of the entire field.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5278. Continental Rationalism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to selected topics in 17th- and 18th-century philosophers in the Rationalist tradition such as Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5279. Kant. 3 Credit Hours.

In depth study of some of the major critical writings of Kant.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8601. Pro-Seminar in 20th-Century Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the pro-seminar is the acquaint students with philosophical methodology and reasoning from a variety of influential perspectives in the field. The Pro-Seminar is taught by different faculty each semester. Content and course material are at the instructors discretion.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8602. Seminar in Greek Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine Greek philosophical conceptions of pleasure and hedonism. We will begin with some Presocratic material, then move to Plato (selections from Gorgias, Protagoras, Republic). We will examine Plato's Philebus in its entirety. Thereafter, we will look at Aristotle's treatments in Nicomachean Ethics VII and X, including Eudoxus' arguments, as well as Rhetoric I. Finally, we will consider the hedonism of the Cyrenaics and Epicureans.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8611. Seminar in Continental Rationalism. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 17th- and 18th-century philosophers such as Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8616. Seminar in British Empiricism. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 17th- and 18th-century philosophers such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Reid.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8621. Seminar in Kant. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8626. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8631. Seminar in Contemporary Continental Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8636. Seminar in Contemporary British and American Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8641. Seminar in American Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in the thought of American philosophers, especially the American pragmatists such as James, Dewey, and Pierce.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8666. Seminar in Philosophy of the Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8701. Seminar in Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

The general plan of the seminar is to explore the master thinkers of continental aesthetics from an analytic vantage and against the dominant themes of Anglo-American aesthetics. I anticipate drawing on a good selection of continental authors and a specimen or two of a more sustained treatment. This would involve, for instance, a selection among the classic figures spanning Kant and Hegel, phenomenology, hermeneutics, structuralism, post-structuralism, and the Frankfurt-critical school at least. Proposals of topics or figures are welcome.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8704. Seminar in Philosophy of Literary Criticism. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics concern the critic's task of describing, interpreting, and judging literary works, e.g., the language of poetry, metaphor, style, form, symbolism, truth, evaluation, obscenity.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8712. Seminar in Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8721. Seminar in Social and Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar will examine three core approaches in contemporary political philosophy--Rawlsian contractarianism, Habermassian critical social theory, and feminist political theory--and will critically analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each through a study of their main exponents. Since recent controversies in social and political philosophy have tended to focus on global issues, some attention will be given to how these three approaches address questions of global justice, political ecology, and cooperation and solidarity across borders.  The seminar will proceed through a close study of key texts from each approach and will involve oral presentations by participants and an original research paper.  Readings will include John Rawls, Thomas Pogge, Jurgen Habermas, Iris Marion Young, Alison Jaggar, and Nancy Fraser.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8731. Seminar in the Philosophy of the Mind. 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of current views of such topics as materialistic accounts of mind, intentionality, the analysis of specific mental phenomena (e.g., belief, consciousness, emotion, desire), ascription of mental attributes to machines.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8741. Seminar in Epistemology. 3 Credit Hours.

For the most part, we will closely study disputes surrounding foundationalism. Originally a theory about justified belief, foundationalism has become a watchword in wider cultural wars. Because its wider use is not wholly unrelated to its original use in the theory of knowledge, it is certainly something on which we should try to achieve clarity. A recent anthology entitled Contemporary Debates in Epistemology, edited by Matthias Steup & Ernest Sosa contains essays, pro and con, on various aspects of this issue, written by a number of leading epistemologists, and with both defenses and critiques of each of the positions involved. The topics in the anthology cover, among other things, the nature of justification, a priori knowledge, perception, skepticism, the ethics of belief, truth, and context. The hope is that we can work through the 11 sections of this text to achieve a better grasp of the issues and their broader implications for our understanding.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8746. Seminar in Metaphysics. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8755. Seminar in the Philosophy of Language. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to topics in the philosophy of language such as meaning, reference, metaphor, speech-act theory, and vagueness.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 9682. Tutorial. 6 Credit Hours.

Independent study for graduates with a professor within the department, usually their advisor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 9782. Tutorial. 9 Credit Hours.

Independent study for graduates with a professor within the department, usually their advisor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 9882. Tutorial. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Independent study for graduates with a professor within the department, usually their advisor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 9982. Tutorial. 3 Credit Hours.

Independent study for graduates with a professor within the department, usually their advisor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 9994. Preliminary Examination Preparation. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 9996. Master's Thesis Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 9998. Pre-Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Registration required each semester after Preliminary Examinations while researching the dissertation proposal.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

PHIL 9999. Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.
Student Attribute Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: Dissertation Writing Student.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Contacts

Program Web Address:

http://www.cla.temple.edu/philosophy/graduate-program/

Department Information:

Dept. of Philosophy

728 Anderson Hall

1114 Polett Walk

Philadelphia, PA 19122-6090

slawson@temple.edu

215-204-1742

Mailing Address for Application Materials:

Dept. of Philosophy

724 Anderson Hall (022-32)

1114 Polett Walk

Philadelphia, PA 19122-6090

Department Contacts:

Graduate Coordinator:

Sonia Lawson

slawson@temple.edu

215-204-1742

Director of Graduate Studies:

Dr. Kristin Gjesdal

kgjesdal@temple.edu

215-204-1742

Chairperson:

Dr. Miriam Solomon

msolomon@temple.edu

215-204-9629