Conflict and Communication, M.S.

LEW KLEIN COLLEGE OF MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION

About the Program

The Master of Science in Conflict and Communication program enables emerging scholars to understand processes of conflict and reconciliation from a communication theory and research perspective; to conduct research on conflict and communication processes; and to support practitioners in the development of optimal processes and systems in community, workplace, and international environments. As students work toward completion of the degree, they:

  • learn a strong social science theory-driven approach to studying and researching the influence of communication on conflict development, escalation, and resolution;
  • examine how communication processes create, reflect, and address conflict across cultural and situational contexts;
  • gain the competency to analyze and apply conflict solutions to various social settings, including interpersonal, organizational, community, and media-based interactions;
  • learn how to analyze the interplay between social identity construction and conflict;
  • develop theory-based approaches to help practitioners work in conflict spaces effectively; and
  • work with professors who are renowned scholars and practitioners in the conflict field.

In short, our students and faculty do not simply observe change, but create it.

Time Limit for Degree Completion: 5 years

Campus Location: Main

Full-Time/Part-Time Status: The degree program can be completed on a full- or part-time basis.

Job Prospects: Graduates of the M.S. in Conflict and Communication program stand out in their ability to research and analyze the role communication plays in managing conflict throughout the system. Graduates are prepared to serve in academic, international policy, and think tank organizations; non-profit research institutions; and non-profit organizations focused on social advocacy and social cohesion. This program is also uniquely suited to prepare students for doctoral studies in the social sciences.

Non-Matriculated Student Policy: Non-matriculated students are encouraged to begin with introductory and required courses. If accepted to the program, those courses may be applied toward the degree program, provided grade requirements have been met. Consistent with Graduate School policy, students are permitted to take up to 9 credits before deciding whether to apply formally to the program.

Financing Opportunities: Scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis by the admissions committee.

Admission Requirements and Deadlines

Application Deadline:

Fall: February 15

Applications are accepted on a rolling admission basis.

APPLY ONLINE to this graduate program.

Letters of Reference:
Number Required: 2

From Whom: Letters of recommendation should be obtained from college/university faculty members, professional supervisors, or others familiar with the applicant’s academic or professional competence. Those who graduated within the past five years should provide at least one letter from an academic reference. Non-academic recommendations are also accepted.

Bachelor's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A baccalaureate degree is required, but it need not have been earned in the field of communication and conflict.

Statement of Goals: In approximately 1,000 words, explain:

  • Your interest in the study of conflict and your view of its place in society;
  • Your career goals in conflict research and analysis; and
  • Your interests, experiences, and the academic or professional achievements you bring to the program.

This statement is used to assess your institutional fit, i.e., how you will benefit from our program and what you will contribute to our learning community. Toward this end, please review the descriptions of our program, curriculum, and faculty, and incorporate this content into your statement. The strongest statement integrates your answers to the above prompts into a coherent essay.

Standardized Test Scores:
Applicants who earned their baccalaureate degree from an institution where the language of instruction was other than English, with the exception of those who subsequently earned a master’s degree at a U.S. institution, must report scores for a standardized test of English that meet these minimums:

  • TOEFL iBT: 105
  • IELTS Academic: 7.0
  • PTE Academic: 72

Resume: Current professional resume or curriculum vitae is required.

Writing Sample: Applicants are required to submit a writing sample that best demonstrates their writing ability, although a writing sample that is based on or reflects social science research is preferred. You may submit academic work published in a professional outlet or college publication or a formal academic paper from your undergraduate studies that includes a cover sheet identifying the course and term for which the academic paper was written and at which institution the paper was produced.

Program Requirements

General Program Requirements:
Number of Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 32 or 35 if CNCM 52011 is not waived

Required Courses:

Year 1
Second Summer SessionCredit Hours
CNCM 520113
 Term Credit Hours3
Fall
CNCM 5000Conflict and Communication Colloquium1
CNCM 5101Conflict and Communication Theory3
CNCM 5102Media and Social Conflict3
CNCM 5202Methods for Conflict and Communication Research3
 Term Credit Hours10
Spring
CNCM 5000Conflict and Communication Colloquium1
CNCM 5203Data Analysis for Conflict and Communication Research3
Electives6
 Term Credit Hours10
Year 2
Fall
CNCM 5204Advanced Data Analysis for Conflict and Communication Research3
Electives6
 Term Credit Hours9
Spring
CNCM 9996Conflict and Communication Thesis Research3
 Term Credit Hours3
 Total Credit Hours: 35

Culminating Event:
Master's Thesis:
Students complete a thesis related to conflict and communication.

Courses

CNCM 5000. Conflict and Communication Colloquium. 1 Credit Hour.

In a one-hour colloquium, on a weekly basis throughout the first year of the masters program, this course introduces students to the academic field of conflict and communication by exploring current problems and opportunities in this field of study through discussions and presentations of current research and through presentations by scholars and practitioners of conflict and communication research and practice.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

CNCM 5101. Conflict and Communication Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines the role of communication theories in settings where there is an attempt to manage conflict among individuals or groups. The course is organized around the major theoretical perspectives that have been used to study conflict. These perspectives describe, explain and sometimes predict the route that conflict often takes. These perspectives are drawn from diverse academic disciplines, but each contributes in unique ways to our understanding of conflict processes and each sheds light on the way communication unfolds in difficult conflict situations. Students will enhance their understanding of the nature of theoretical perspectives in general, as well as study specific conflict theories that have been created with each perspective. This focus enables students to understand and draw from current and future theory and research on conflict. The goal is to develop astute practitioners who know the research and theory on conflict and can use it and apply it in professional and personal settings. A significant emphasis is placed in the course on communication processes in conflict. This emphasis on conflict interaction allows for many practical insights about how to understand and change conflict dynamics. Although this course is not a training course, it provides a foundation for those who want to teach conflict skills and conflict intervention methods to people in workplace, community and family settings. Knowledge of communication processes provides a solid foundation for such work.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CNCM 5102. Media and Social Conflict. 3 Credit Hours.

In today's media environment, social, political, and cultural conflicts play out in news, social media, and interpersonal media (i.e. text). This class explores the role media play in creating conflict, as well as facilitating inter- and intra-personal discussions regarding such conflicts. This will be explored at the family, group, community, and mass social levels. The positive and negative influences of media in creating, negotiating, and resolving conflict will be explored.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CNCM 5202. Methods for Conflict and Communication Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to engage in social science research in conflict and communication. Students will learn to design their own research studies as well as critique existing research based on credibility, validity, and reliability of design and methods. By the end of this course students will have designed and be prepared to execute an individual theory-driven research project, be able to evaluate conflict research, and be able to present a conference quality research paper. This course is designed to challenge students to not only be able to read and critique research but prepare them to conduct their own research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CNCM 5203. Data Analysis for Conflict and Communication Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to engage in social science research in conflict and communication. Students will learn to apply basic quantitative analysis skills to their own research studies as well as critique existing research based on credibility, validity, and reliability of analytic methods. By the end of this course students will be prepared to conduct basic statistical analysis of original and secondary data, use data tools such as Qualtrics and SPSS, and understand which statistical test is appropriate for different types of research questions. This course is designed not only to challenge students to be able to read and critique data analysis, but also to prepare them to conduct their own research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CNCM 5204. Advanced Data Analysis for Conflict and Communication Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to engage in social science research in conflict and communication. This course builds on the basic data analysis course (CNCM 5203) and helps develop advanced analytical techniques. Students will learn to apply advanced quantitative analysis skills to their own research studies as well as critique existing research based on credibility, validity, and reliability of analytic methods. By the end of this course students will be prepared to conduct advanced statistical analysis of original and secondary data, use data tools such as PROCESS, R, and SPSS, and understand which statistical test is appropriate for different types of research questions and hypotheses. This course is designed not only to challenge students to be able to read and critique data analysis, but also to prepare them to conduct their own research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CNCM 5203|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently.

CNCM 5301. Cross-Cultural Negotiation. 3 Credit Hours.

Research on the influence of culture on negotiation processes has grown extensively over the past twenty years across disciplines that include communication, management, political science, and psychology. Studies focus on negotiation in a wide variety of cross-cultural and intercultural contexts such as international diplomacy and multinational corporations. This course examines current theoretical issues related to the study of negotiation in intercultural contexts and explores insights gained from studying both culture and negotiation within these contexts.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CNCM 9996. Conflict and Communication Thesis Research. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to aid students in their final thesis project. The course will provide a writers' workshop environment, including active peer and faculty feedback. Students will have opportunities to develop theoretical and written perspectives in a supportive group environment. Students will also have the opportunity to receive ample feedback and guidance on their final required thesis for the CNCM program.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Contacts

Program Web Address:

https://klein.temple.edu/academics/graduate-programs/master-science-conflict-and-communication

Department Information:

Lew Klein College of Media and Communication

Office of Research and Graduate Studies

2020 N. 13th Street, 344 Annenberg Hall

Philadelphia, PA 19122-6015

kaitlin.pierce@temple.edu

215-204-8560

Submission Address for Application Materials:

https://apply.temple.edu/Klein/

Department Contacts:

Admissions:

Kaitlin Pierce

kaitlin.pierce@temple.edu

215-204-8560

Program Director:

Quaiser Abdullah, Ph.D.

quaiser@temple.edu

215-204-6808