Art History

Dr. Elizabeth Bolman, Chairperson of Art History
Tyler School of Art Building 
Administrative Suite Room 210M
215-777-9165
elizabeth.bolman@temple.edu

Dr. Jonathan Kline, Undergraduate Advisor
Tyler School of Art Building
Art History Suite Room 211
215-777-9742
jdkline@temple.edu

The Department of Art History offers broad-ranging introductory surveys of art, from prehistoric times to the present, and more closely focused courses, treating limited segments of the vast historic panorama in both western and non-western art. Approximately sixty courses are offered over the span of a four-year period.

The Department of Art History is strongest in the Western tradition, with relatively equal distribution of focus on Ancient/Medieval, Renaissance/Baroque, and Modern/Contemporary. There are particular strengths in the study of art from the Mediterranean region, with specialists in Bronze Age Aegean, Ancient Roman, Medieval Byzantine and Coptic, Italian and Spanish Renaissance and Baroque, and Modern Italy and France, and in the study of modern and contemporary American art.

The Graduate Student Art History Association sponsors lectures and exhibition visits open to all students throughout the year.

Courses

ARTH 0803. The Art of Sacred Space. 3 Credit Hours.

Where do people go to communicate with the divine? Explore with us where and how people of the many different cultures of the Greco-Roman world communicated with their gods. Why are graves and groves considered sacred space? When is a painting or sculpture considered sacred? Whom do the gods allow to enter a sacred building? Can a song be a prayer or a curse? How can dance sway the gods? Why do gods love processions and the smell of burning animals? The journey through sacred space in Greco-Roman antiquity will engage your senses and your intellect, and will reveal a mindset both ancient and new. NOTE: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed REL 0803 or GRC 0803/0903.

Course Attributes: GA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 0808. Arts of the Western World: The Visual Experience. 4 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the visual arts of the Western Tradition, from their origins in the prehistoric period to the present day. Students in this course study the great monuments and major movements that place the visual arts of the Western Tradition in a broad cultural framework. Attention will be given to the concepts that connect the progression of ideas in artistic communication and expression from the ancient world to modern times. The course may also make use of local resources in the visual arts through museum, theater, and/or gallery visits. NOTE: (1) Field trips are mandatory for this class. (2) This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. (3) Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed ARTH 1001 or C051.

Course Attributes: GA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 0813. The History of Art in Rome. 4 Credit Hours.

Weekly class lectures and on-site visits provide a survey of Roman art from the Etruscan through the Baroque periods, and therefore, from the founding of the ancient city in the 8th century B.C. to circa 1700. Students study each period's art and architecture and define its place within the general context of Roman civilization. Rome's position as both capital of the ancient empire and of the Western Latin Church has earned her the well-recognized sobriquet, Eternal City. Consequently, students confront how the idea of Rome had bearing upon the formation of its art and architecture within the chronological context. The course as a whole can be considered an introduction to art history in the field, as each week the class visits a historical site or museum in order to reconstruct through living examples the artistic fabric of the city. NOTE: (1) This course is taught in Rome. (2) This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core.

Course Attributes: GA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1001. The Visual Experience. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to art from the position of the observer, the artist, the scholar, and the critic. Covers techniques of architecture, painting, drawing and sculpture with a short survey of art from its beginnings to present day; museum trips. Emphasis on an analysis of individual works. NOTE: (1) Field trips are mandatory for this class. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1003. History of Art in Rome. 4 Credit Hours.

Weekly class lectures and on-site visits provide a survey of Roman art from the Etruscan through the Baroque periods, and therefore, from the founding of the ancient city in the 8th century B.C. to circa 1700. Students study each period's art and architecture and define its place within the general context of Roman civilization. Rome's position as both capital of the ancient empire and of the Western Latin Church has earned her the well-recognized sobriquet, Eternal City. Consequently, students confront how the idea of Rome had bearing upon the formation of its art and architecture within the chronological context. The course as a whole can be considered an introduction to art history in the field, as each week the class visits a historical site or museum in order to reconstruct through living examples the artistic fabric of the city. NOTE: This course is taught in Rome. This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1101. Art Heritage Western World I. 4 Credit Hours.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1102. Art Heritage Western World II. 4 Credit Hours.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1148. International Cinema. 3 Credit Hours.

A selection of films from modern Europe and Third World cultures which demonstrate both their interaction with postmodern politics, theory and culture, and the development of an international alternative discourse to Hollywood commercial film-making. Films will be selected according to a theme each semester. Past courses: Italian Neo-Realism, Independent Film Makers, and Women in Film. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 1155. Art Heritage of the Western World I. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course examine and analyze the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the Western tradition from the era of Prehistory through the Early Renaissance in Europe. Students analyze the forms, techniques, styles, subjects, and symbolism represented in architecture, sculpture, and painting both historically and in relation to the impact of societal beliefs and values. Students employ contemporary methods in the interpretation of forms, subjects, and artistic differences and parallels. NOTE: (1) Field trips are mandatory for this class. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1156. Art Heritage of the Western World II. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course examine and analyze the art of the Western tradition, including architecture, sculpture, painting, and modern media, from the Early Renaissance in Europe to global art of the present day. Students analyze the forms, techniques, styles, subjects, and symbolism represented in art and architecture both historically and in relation to the impact of societal beliefs and values. Students employ contemporary methods in the interpretation of forms, subjects, and artistic differences and parallels. NOTE: (1) Field trips are mandatory for this class. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1801. Arts of Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

Architecture, sculpture, painting and the functional arts of Asia (India, China, Japan and Southeast Asia). A historical examination of the art as a religious expression and as a product of changing social and economic conditions. The material culture of Asia will be examined with an emphasis on differing world views and perspectives with which to "see" art. NOTE: (1) Field trips are mandatory for this class. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1955. Honors Art Heritage of the Western World I. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course examine and analyze the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the Western tradition from the era of Prehistory through the Early Renaissance in Europe. Students analyze the forms, techniques, styles, subjects, and symbolism represented in architecture, sculpture, and painting both historically and in relation to the impact of societal beliefs and values. Students employ contemporary methods in the interpretation of forms, subjects, and artistic differences and parallels. NOTE: This course is for Honors students. (1) Field trips are mandatory for this class. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: AR, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 1956. Honors Art Heritage of the Western World II. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course examine and analyze the art of the Western tradition, including architecture, sculpture, painting, and modern media, from the Early Renaissance in Europe to global art of the present day. Students analyze the forms, techniques, styles, subjects, and symbolism represented in art and architecture both historically and in relation to the impact of societal beliefs and values. Students employ contemporary methods in the interpretation of forms, subjects, and artistic differences and parallels. NOTE: This course is for Honors students. (1) Field trips are mandatory for this class. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: AR, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2000. Topics in Art History. 1 to 4 Credit Hour.

A selected topic from a specific period in the history of art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this course.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2001. European Crafts and Decorative Arts. 4 Credit Hours.

Traces the development of crafts from the beginning to the Industrial Revolution, focusing on the role of the craft-worker in society, the role of the patron, and the styles of different eras. Includes European, Mediterranean, and Islamic crafts. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2002. History of Modern Crafts. 4 Credit Hours.

Traces the ideas, personnel, workshops, objects & styles of the Arts & Crafts Movement from William Morris to Henry Mercer (1850s-ca. 1915), in Europe and the United States. Charles & Margaret Mackintosh in Scotland, Eliel Saarinen in Finland, Charles Ashbee and the Guild of Handicraft in England will be studied, among others; Stickley, Roycroft, Frank Lloyd Wright, Tiffany, etc., in the U.S., and other key designers/crafters of clay, metal, fiber, wood, glass. The influence of Japanese art & craft is a key issue for this course; also the development of the various forms of Art Nouveau. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2003. History of Modern Crafts & Design, Part 2. 4 Credit Hours.

This class will explore the decorative arts, crafts and design styles and movements that developed from the post WWI period to the present day. The first half of class will focus on the Bauhaus, Wiener Werkstatte, Art Deco and Streamlined Design. The second half of the semester will feature the Contemporary Craft Movement from its birth after WWII to the changing state of Craft today. The goal of the class is to learn about and become well versed in the craft and design style periods of the 20th century, the major changes going on in Europe and America that affected these artistic styles, as well as the designers and artists working in the craft and design worlds. Special attention will be given to how these topics are related to the Philadelphia area. Museum visits, critical reading and critical writing are integral to the class. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2004. History of Printmaking. 4 Credit Hours.

This course explores how various printmaking media, such as woodcut, etching, lithography, and silkscreen have changed the way artists put their ideas to paper from the Renaissance to contemporary times. Beginning with European woodcut and engraving in the early 15th century and Japanese woodblock printing dating from the 17th century, students examine how print technologies related to the older methods they replaced. Emphasis will be placed on major printmakers including Dürer, Rembrandt, Piranesi, Goya, Utamaro, Hokusai, Hiroshige, Degas, Toulouse-Lautrec, Kollwitz, Munch, and contemporary artists such as Lorna Simpson, Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, and others. Uses of prints in popular and propagandistic communication will also be explored.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2007. World Photography Since 1839. 4 Credit Hours.

A history of photography from 1839 to the present and its relation to cultural contexts as well as to various theories of the functions of images. Topics discussed in considering the nineteenth century will be the relationship between photography and painting, the effect of photography on portraiture, photography in the service of exploration, and photography as practiced by anthropologists; and in considering the twentieth century, photography and abstraction, photography as fine art, photography and the critique of art history, and photography and censorship. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2008. History of Photography. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course examine and analyze the history of the photographic process and its product from its inception to contemporary innovations. Critical approaches to the evaluation and interpretation of photography are also explored.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2010. Topics in Art History. 1 to 4 Credit Hour.

A selected topic from a specific period in the history of art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2011. Philadelphia Architecture. 4 Credit Hours.

This course traces the development of Philadelphia architecture from the 17th to the 20th centuries, with special attention given to the major architects who contributed to that development.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2013. Art of the Film. 4 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the study of film as a work of art, an analysis of the ways filmic style and structure express meaning on several levels. Specific directors or auteurs, actors, movements, styles and technical or message-laden filmic challenges are treated, as are the relationship of film to the novel, the drama, and to the larger context of modernist and post-modern art credos and movements. Various genres of feature film, such as anti-war, feminist, noir, comedy, action, etc., are considered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2039. Myth and Allegory in European Art, 14c - 18c. 4 Credit Hours.

Students in this course examine and analyze the representation of myth and allegory in visual art across several periods - the Gothic era, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Romantic eras - with particular attention to the significance of form and meaning in relation to textual sources, visual models, and the larger cultural context. Students may consider such topics as: personification and moralizing allegories in the Gothic era; poetic, dynastic, and religious allegories in Renaissance and Baroque art; and Romantic nature-allegories and social criticism. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2041. Architectural History: Ancient to Renaissance. 3 Credit Hours.

Traces the history of western architecture from the ancient world to the High Renaissance and Mannerism of the late 16th century.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2042. Architectural History: Renaissance to the 20th Century. 3 Credit Hours.

Traces the history of western architecture from the 17th century through the 20th century. The evolution of architectural thought, various formal languages (style) and theoretical concepts studied through the examination of selected buildings within their specific political, social, economic, and cultural milieu.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2061. Art of Landscape Painting. 4 Credit Hours.

An examination of landscape painting from the ancient world to the present. Its origins as a more specific genre in the 17th century is explored and particular attention is paid to its efflorescence in French and American 19th century art. How landscape painting develops in the art of the twentieth century is also analyzed, especially in relation to concepts of expressionism, abstraction, the sublime, conceptualism, land art, and more contemporary forms of realism, as well as to ideas about regionalism, nationalism and globalism. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2096. Art History Writing Intensive. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic from a specific period in the history of art will be examined. NOTE: This is a Writing Intensive Course. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2097. Art History Writing Intensive. 3 Credit Hours.

A selected topic from a specific period in the history of art will be examined. NOTE: This is a Writing Intensive Course. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2098. Art History Writing Intensive. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic from a specific period in the history of art will be examined. NOTE: This is a Writing Intensive Course. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2101. Art of Ancient Egypt and the Aegean. 4 Credit Hours.

The Bronze Age art of the Eastern Mediterranean was the predecessor for the Classical world of ancient Greece and Rome. Ancient Egypt, Minoan Crete, and Mycenaean Greece developed rich artistic styles during the early centuries of civilized life. Their art included some very rich and highly expressive forms of visual communication. Bronze Age society supported splendid palaces and large cities as well as small and humble settlements. The art of this period has some very interesting ways of expressing ideas, and its colorful and often symbolic iconography was very different from much of the art of later times. The course will cover the painting, sculpture, architecture, and crafts of these societies that flourished from about 3000 to 1000 BC. The course will include written papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2102. Greek Mythology and Art. 4 Credit Hours.

Mythology played a major role in the subject matter of ancient Greek art. The stories recorded in myths and legends were illustrated both as interesting tales and as symbols for different aspects of human life and culture. The Greeks had many gods, goddesses, deified heroes, demons, and other supernatural beings whose activities and adventures ranged from the comical to the heroic. Their fascinating world made interesting art. This course explores the world of the ancient Greek myths and how they were used in ancient vase paintings, sculpture, wall paintings, and other media. The course will include written papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2105. Roman Art and Archaeology. 4 Credit Hours.

From a group of thatched huts on the banks of the Tiber River, to a wall built to keep the Picts out of England; from the marble temples to the emperors in modern Turkey to the houses of North Africa; from the theaters in Roman Gaul to the destroyed town of Pompeii, the Romans inhabited the entire Mediterranean basin and formed a diverse urban society. We will explore how the Romans built and decorated their houses, how they buried their dead, how they interacted in public spaces, and how they used art in the service of the sacred. We will begin with the formation of Rome in the 8th century BCE, and finish when Constantine moves the capital of the Empire to the east. In this chronological unfolding of the Roman world, we will explore how the Romans developed different building types for their new urban needs; developed the art of interior painting and mosaic; used sculpture to glorify the individual and explain what it means to be a "Roman." We will pay particular attention to the interplay between the city of Rome and its monuments and the larger cultural world the Romans inhabited, especially where they met other art styles that influenced the development of their own - in Greece, France, Asia Minor, the Middle East and Africa. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2110. Topics in Ancient Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic from the Ancient period in the history of art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2111. Minoan Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in the art and archaeology of the Bronze Age Aegean will be studied in detail through student presentations, discussions, readings, and lectures by the instructor. Topics will be broad enough to include both information that is already part of the general conclusions for the field as well as subjects that are still hotly debated. A research paper is required. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2117. Archaeological Excavation. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Requires permission of the instructor. Credit given for participating in an archaeological excavation.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2129. Greek and Roman Sculpture. 4 Credit Hours.

When is a naked male a god? Are females a sum of their hairstyles and clothes? We begin our exploration of the sculptor's view of the human body in the 7th century BCE and finish as the rise of a newly legal religion changes the form of sculpture in the early 4th century CE. Along the way we will investigate the portrayal of the body in space, the use of emotion, the changing role of nudity as costume, and the depiction of different ethnic groups and ages, the beginning of portraiture, and the representation of non-humans, as the Greek and Roman sculptors portray the Other, the emperor, the god, and more. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2135. Art and Archeology of Ancient Rome and the Mediterranean. 4 Credit Hours.

Weekly class lectures and on-site visits provide an outline of the origins and development of Italian and Roman art between the 8th century B.C. and the 4th century A.D. Special attention is paid to the cultures that influenced the formation of Roman art: the Greeks in southern Italy and the Etruscans in Tuscany and Latium. The course deals with architecture (and urban design), sculpture, painting, and mosaics. To complete the picture of Roman art, a survey is also given of Roman art in the provinces of the Empire. The course includes a weekend excursion outside of Rome. NOTE: This course is taught in Rome.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2196. Greek and Roman Sculpture. 4 Credit Hours.

When is a naked male a god? Are females a sum of their hairstyles and clothes? We begin our exploration of the sculptor's view of the human body in the 7th century BCE and finish as the rise of a newly legal religion changes the form of sculpture in the early 4th century CE. Along the way we will investigate the portrayal of the body in space, the use of emotion, the changing role of nudity as costume, and the depiction of different ethnic groups and ages, the beginning of portraiture, and the representation of non-humans, as the Greek and Roman sculptors portray the Other, the emperor, the god, and more. NOTE: This is a Writing Intensive Course. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2200. Topics in Medieval Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic from the Medieval period in the history of art will be examined.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2215. Late Antique/Byzantine Art. 4 Credit Hours.

The visual culture of the Mediterranean region in Late Antiquity (ca. 200 - 400) is explored, charting the transformation of the Roman world into an eastern Mediterranean empire which we call Byzantium, and continuing up to the conquest of Constantinople (Istanbul) in 1453. Special attention is given to the social and religious functions of images and architecture, and to typical settings in which these visual tools were deployed, for example the imperial state, monasticism, and the church. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2216. Early Medieval Visual Culture. 4 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the visual culture of Western Europe and the Western Mediterranean from about 400 through the year 1000. Intensive areas of focus are the Anglo-Saxon, Carolingian and Ottonian periods, as well as early Medieval Spain, and the use of art and architecture to shape ideas about institutions such as kingship and monasticism. Manuscript illuminations receive special attention. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class. (Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "The Dark Ages.")

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2217. Gothic Art. 4 Credit Hours.

This course presents the transformative phenomenon of the Gothic, with its emblematic creation, the Gothic cathedral: a fusion of architecture, stained glass, and sculpture. Romanesque precursors are studied, as well as certain themes, such as the art of the Western Crusaders in the Eastern Mediterranean, and the rise of secular art and architecture. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2300. Special Topics. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

A selected topic in the history of art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2310. Topics in Renaissance Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in Renaissance art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2321. Masters of Renaissance Art. 4 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the construction of artistic identity and style from the mid-fifteenth century to the early-seventeenth century through visual analyses, readings of contemporary sources (biographies/autobiographies, art treatises, and correspondences), and modern scholarship in an attempt to demystify the "Masters" of the Italian Renaissance. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2323. Early Renaissance: Italy. 4 Credit Hours.

Central Italian art from Giotto to Leonardo da Vinci; and the Venetian school from Bellini through Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2325. Northern Renaissance Art 1350-1550. 4 Credit Hours.

Late Gothic and Renaissance traditions in France, Germany, and the Low Countries, with emphasis on 15th century Netherlandish art and 16th century German painting, sculpture, and graphic arts. Featured artists include Jan Van Eyck, Albrecht Dürer, Matthias Grünewald, Hieronymus Bosch, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, with an emphasis on new developments relating to Netherlandish "realism," print technology, the Reformation, and an emerging market for art works. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2329. Renaissance and Baroque Architecture in Italy. 4 Credit Hours.

Humanism and the revival of antiquity in Florence and Rome form the background for a study of the theory and practice of Alberti, Michelangelo and Palladio. The subsequent evolution of Mannerist and Baroque style in Italy leads to an examination of 17th century architecture and its influence in Europe. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2350. Topics in Early Modern Art, 1400-1750. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in Early Modern Art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2400. Topics in Baroque Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic from the Baroque period in the history of art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2428. High and Late Baroque Art in Rome. 4 Credit Hours.

Weekly class lectures and on-site visits examine 17th century Rome, the center of baroque art and culture in Italy and Europe. Many of the most significant works of painting, sculpture, and architecture from c. 1580-c. 1750 are viewed first hand during weekly on-site visits in Rome. Special attention is given to works by Italian artists such as Annibale Carracci, Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentileschi, Pietro da Cortona, Bernini, and Borromini (among others). The cultural context of Rome and papal patronage are investigated. A two-day field trip to Naples provides students with the opportunity to visit the Capodimonte Museum and to explore baroque churches in the historic center, "Spaccanapoli." NOTE: This course is taught in Rome.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2431. Southern Baroque Art: Italy and Spain. 4 Credit Hours.

Art in Italy and Spain in the age of Caravaggio; the Carracci invention of the Academy; the High Baroque of Cortona, Bernini, and Velasquez; the artistic centers of Rome, Naples, Madrid. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2432. Northern Baroque Art. 4 Credit Hours.

Art in Holland in the age of Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer, the High Baroque as an international style with Rubens and Van Dyck, with artistic relations between Italy, Flanders, France, England and Spain. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2450. Topics in Eighteenth Century Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in eighteenth-century art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2496. Southern Baroque Art: Italy and Spain. 4 Credit Hours.

Art in Italy and Spain in the age of Caravaggio; the Carracci invention of the Academy; the High Baroque of Cortona, Bernini, and Velasquez; the artistic centers of Rome, Naples, Madrid. NOTE: This is a Writing Intensive Course. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2497. Northern Baroque Art. 4 Credit Hours.

Art in Holland in the age of Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer, the High Baroque as an international style with Rubens and Van Dyck, with artistic relations between Italy, Flanders, France, England and Spain. NOTE: This is a Writing Intensive Course. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2500. Topics in 19th Century Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in the history of art from the 19th century will be examined.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2535. Romanticism. 4 Credit Hours.

European art of the romantic era, 1750 to 1850. Painting, sculpture, and selected works of architecture in England, France, and Germany, with attention to such giants as Piranesi, Canova, David, Goya, Friedrich, Runge, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Constable and Turner. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2543. Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. 4 Credit Hours.

This course will study the art of France, in the second half of the 19th century as the origin of modernism. Methodologies such as feminism, social art history, and psychoanalytic perspectives will be engaged to analyze the artists and their pictorial work in a variety of media. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2563. Painting: Late 19th Century. 4 Credit Hours.

Survey of European painting between 1870 and 1900, concentrating on Realism and Symbolism in France, Belgium, England, Germany, Austria and Scandinavia. Artists to be considered in detail are Monet, Cezanne, Batien-Lepage, Gauguin, Rossetti, Burne-Jones, Whistler, Leighton, Knopff, Menzel, Hodler, Munch and Zorn.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2600. Topics in 20th Century Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in the history of art from the 20th century will be examined.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2601. History of Modern Graphic Design. 4 Credit Hours.

The mixture of image and type we view today as graphic design has a history rooted in the earliest pictographs on pre-historic cave walls, evolving through such experiences as Roman political campaigns, medieval illuminated manuscripts, Renaissance book design, and the Industrial Revolution before arriving in the twentieth century. Keeping this rich heritage in mind, this course will investigate the development of graphic design from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, as a result of technological advances, political upheaval, commerce, and cultural and artistic exchange. We will discuss issues and works that are relevant to the field of graphic design in order to enrich your practice and develop critical thinking skills that will be useful to you throughout your academic and professional careers in other environments as well.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2610. Topics in Modern and Contemporary Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in Modern and Contemporary Art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2622. Galleries and Studios of Rome. 4 Credit Hours.

A course designed to give an overview of the artistic developments in Rome during the past 25 years and to offer insight into the diverse trends of contemporary art in the city. Visits are made to galleries, specific exhibitions, and artists' studios. NOTE: This course is taught in Rome.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2642. Modern Painting and Sculpture 1900-45. 4 Credit Hours.

This course examines the major artists and movements in art from 1900 to 1945, placing them within a larger social and political context. Movements to be considered include: Fauvism; Cubism; Futurism; German Expressionism; the Russian Avant-Garde; De Stijl; Purism; the Bauhaus; Dada; Surrealism; and American Early Modernism. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2644. Modern Art: 1945 to the Present. 4 Credit Hours.

This course examines the major artists and movements in art from 1945 to the present, placing them within a larger social and political context. Developments to be considered include: Abstract Expressionism; Neo-Dada; Nouveaux Realism; Assemblage; Environments; Happenings; Pop; Op; Minimal; Post-Minimal; Performance; Earthworks; Conceptual; Installation; New Image; Neo-Expressionism; Post/Neo-Conceptual; and others. Issues of feminism, multiculturalism, and critical theory are also considered. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2651. Symbolism, Dada, and Surrealism. 4 Credit Hours.

This course investigates certain movements within Modernism that explore fantasy, psychology, imagination, humor, irrationality, violence, the grotesque, the unconscious, the abject, and the absurd. Symbolism and some aspects of Expressionism are approached in relation to the key twentieth-century international developments of Metaphysical Art, Dada and Surrealism. Works in various media are considered, including those outside the visual arts (such as poetry and music), paying particular attention to challenges to the definition of art and the social and political implications of these challenges. Artists considered include: Moreau, Redon, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Munch, Rousseau, de Chirico, Duchamp, Picabia, Tzara, Arp, Man Ray, Bréton, Schwitters, Höch, Grosz, Ernst, Masson, Miro, Magritte, Matta, Kahlo, Tanguy, Dali, Gorky and others. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2658. Picasso and Modern Masters. 4 Credit Hours.

This course investigates the work of four major modern artists - Picasso, Matisse, Duchamp, and Brancusi- and places them in a variety of cultural, social, esthetic, and historical contexts. Because the works of these artists are strongly represented in the Philadelphia Museum and in other local collections, several trips to examine work first-hand are planned.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2660. Topics in International Cinema. 4 Credit Hours.

Students in this course study a selection of films from modern Europe and Third World cultures which demonstrate both their interaction with postmodern politics, theory and culture, and the development of an international alternative discourse to Hollywood commercial film-making. Films will be selected according to a theme each semester. Past themes have included Italian Neo-Realism, Independent Film Makers, and Women in Film.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2700. Topics in American Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in American Art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2701. Main Trends in American 20th Century Painting. 4 Credit Hours.

Ashcan School, Early American Modernism, Regionalism, Abstract Expressionism, Assemblage, Pop-Optical Art, Minimal Art, Photo-Realism, and Neo-Expressionism will be discussed. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2704. 19th Century American Art. 4 Credit Hours.

An examination of the painting, sculpture, photography and popular illustration of the 19th century in the United States and its cultural context. Visual material is considered as it corresponds to a series of historical moments, including the establishment of the academy, the era of Jacksonian Democracy, the rise of tourism, the birth of photography, the opening of the American West, the Civil War, the rise of Industrial Capitalism, and the emergence of the New Woman. Readings will incorporate a range of methodological approaches as well as a selection of primary source material. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2751. American Art. 4 Credit Hours.

This course explores visual art produced in North America since the arrival of Columbus in 1492. Some pre-contact, pre-Columbian art will be included, but the course is designed to concentrate on works produced since the beginning of European colonialism and the ensuing encounter of diverse cultures, which have contributed to the rich diversity of North American art for the past five hundred years. Although course content focuses on art of the United States, works by some Mexican, Canadian, and Native American artists will be considered as well. A broad purpose of the course is to investigate the role of visual art in creating and negotiating various meanings of "America." Major trends in American art - colonial portraiture, Hudson River landscape painting, Realism, Aestheticism, the Harlem Renaissance, Abstract Expressionism, and Postmodernism, among others - will be examined in the context of American cultural history. The course will introduce students to a multitude of artists and works in a wide variety of media, using an exploratory approach designed to foster visual literacy and historical understanding, not just memorization of minor facts or established stylistic categories. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, readings, exams, and a fieldtrip, the course provides an introductory survey of the arts in North America while encouraging students to look, think, speak, and write critically about what they see. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2752. American Architecture. 4 Credit Hours.

An examination of the major movements and architects in the history of American architecture. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2753. Art and Environment in American Culture. 4 Credit Hours.

Does our present global environmental crisis demand a new way of thinking about art and its history? What role has art played in constructing an image of our environment as natural resource, scientific specimen, mythic Eden, arena of struggle, and/or fragile ecosystem? Can art and art history help envision a more sustainable world or are they part of the problem? As a way of addressing such questions, this course takes an "ecocritical" perspective on American art from the late 19th century (when the word "ecology" first appeared) to the present. More than any other single nation, the United States bears responsibility for the ecological challenges facing our planet, even as its citizens arguably enjoy unparalleled opportunities for creative freedom. By highlighting the interconnectedness of human beings with their environment in America, as well as the power of art to re-imagine that relationship, the course provokes students to re-think accepted canons and practices in light of other criteria having to do with sustainability, environmental justice, and our ethical responsibility to non-human life. Covering a wide range of artists and media - from the Romantic paintings and writings of Thomas Cole and John James Audubon to more recent work by Edward Burtynsky, Subhankar Banerjee, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Robert Smithson, Helen and Newton Harrison, Eduardo Kac, Alexis Rockman, Mark Dion and other contemporary artists active in this country - the course gives students a new and richly diverse opportunity to think about American art. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2800. Topics in Non-Western Art. 4 Credit Hours.

A selected topic in the Non-Western history of art will be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 2807. East Meets West. 4 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on topics related to the correspondence between the arts of Eastern and Western cultures. Past and future topics include: American chromolithography and Japanese woodblock prints; religious iconography in the East and West; art and technology in modern Eastern and Western art and culture; trade and commerce and the interchange of artistic motifs, philosophies and techniques. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2815. Japanese Art. 4 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the history and aesthetics of visual arts in Japan from ancient times to the present through close visual analysis of objects and critical readings. Students study the development of major forms of Japanese visual culture including painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, and ceramics. Special attention will be paid to the cultural, social, and religious context in which works were produced and functioned. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2818. Art of India. 4 Credit Hours.

The art and architecture of the Indian sub-continent from 2500 BC to the present. The Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic religions have been crucially important for the formation of south Asian culture and art. This class will emphasize how religious ideas have been made visually manifest in the arts. Art's role in the formation of modern India will also be examined. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2819. Southeast Asian Art. 4 Credit Hours.

The art and civilization of Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Indonesia, focusing on the key aspects that have shaped cultures from the 5th century AD to modern times. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2868. Arts of Asia. 4 Credit Hours.

Architecture, sculpture, painting and the functional art of Asia (India, China, Japan and Southeast Asia). A historical examination of the art as a religious expression and as a product of changing social and economic conditions. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2871. Chinese Art. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is an introductory survey of the arts of China from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. Looking primarily at works in situ and in Asian collections, we will investigate how art objects and monuments reflect the religious beliefs, political agendas and aesthetic preferences of the artists and patrons who created them. We will also pay particular attention to the roles that media and technology play in the appearance of and status attached to the finished products. Another major theme will be the development of indigenous and imported religions, and their impact on iconography. Finally, time permitting, we will touch on related contemporary subjects, such as forgeries and the illegal trade in looted art. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2897. Writing for Art History: Art History Writing Intensive Seminar. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to become familiar with different kinds of art historical writing, with the ultimate aim of pulling together these skills for a final project of researching and writing a virtual exhibition catalog. Students will build on smaller assignments that involve formal description and analysis of visual images, research and contextual interpretation of images, critical reading of secondary sources, and the writing of extended catalog essays. The course will be thematically based according to the instructor's area of expertise and will include two mandatory group field trips to local and regional museums. Examples of possible topics offered in the future are: Renaissance Portraiture; The Development of Landscape in Western Art; Abstraction; Sacred Images from Antiquity to the Baroque Period.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2904. Honors Counterfeiting, Looting and the Ethics of Collecting Ancient Art. 3 Credit Hours.

Did you know that the Getty Museum paid over 9 million dollars for a statue that many now consider a fake? That some curators believe that 40% of the art on the market today is fake or so restored that we can consider the pieces fake? We will begin looking at some prominent fakes that took in scholars (the Metropolitan's "Etruscan" Warriors), talk about when something becomes a fake, and problematic pieces that are still on display. Fakes are made because there is so much money in the art market, and we will see how this market developed. In doing so we will see how Napoleon's policies ultimately lead to the looting on a massive scale in Nazi Germany; discuss the modern development of international law on looting and the protection of antiquities; and argue about what is the United States' responsibility in Iraq now. Finally, we will look at various means of how governments try to protect their antiquities (paying attention to the real-life soap operas like the Lydian Hoard); what is the role of museums in protecting antiquities (looking at the major news story on the indictment of the curator of the Getty, and the return of the stolen Euphronios vase by the Metropolitan Museum); what dealers do; and how an ethical collector can pursue his/her hobby responsibly. NOTE: This course is for Honors students. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 2990. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topic from a specific period. NOTE: This course is for Honors students. This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: AR, HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 3082. Independent Study. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Intensive study in a specific area under individual guidance. Students must get permission from their department before attempting independent study.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 3097. Art History Capstone. 4 Credit Hours.

Undergraduate Capstone seminar in methodology, historiography, and or criticism of art and art history. Specific topics will vary by semester. This course is required of all art history majors for graduation and should be taken in their junior or senior year. NOTE: This is a Writing Intensive Course. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for Tyler Art History majors who entered the university in fall 2008 or later. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 3182. Independent Study. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Intensive study in a specific area under individual guidance. Students must get permission from their department before attempting independent study.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 3301. Michelangelo. 4 Credit Hours.

Profoundly impressive both for his technique and expressive content - emotional, dramatic, heroic, but always human - Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) continues to be a vital element in the history of art, as he was during the Renaissance. Weekly class lectures and onsite visits examine his drawing, painting, sculpture and architecture in the context of the art and patronage of his own time, starting with a study of Classical Roman Antiquity. In depth, direct viewing of his works such as the Pietà, Sistine Chapel, and Moses are matched by lectures and readings in class, and a trip to Florence offers further access to his oeuvre. We seek to determine why, in the age of virtual reality, viewing him in the original is enduringly powerful and necessary for an understanding of the artist and his impact.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 3302. Women and Art. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of women as subjects of art, as patrons, as creators. The course is organized around the roles of women as represented over the course of western art. Note: Prior to spring 2017, the course title was "Images of Women."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 3324. High Renaissance Art in Italy. 4 Credit Hours.

Painting and sculpture in Italy from Leonardo da Vinci to 1600. The High Renaissance style of Raphael, the art of Michelangelo, Mannerism, and the Counter-Reformation, through Caravaggio. NOTE: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ARTH 4082. Independent Study. 1 to 4 Credit Hour.

Intensive study in a specific area under individual guidance. Students must get permission from their department before attempting independent study.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 4182. Independent Study. 4 Credit Hours.

Intensive study in a specific area under individual guidance. Students must get permission from their department before attempting independent study.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ARTH 4285. Internship. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Students working on relevant projects at area museums or galleries may receive Temple credit toward an art history major or minor. Variable credit depending on the number of hours worked per week, up to six credits maximum. Students will maintain a regular record of activities. Prior arrangements must be made with a host museum or gallery. Requires the permission of the Undergraduate Advisor of the Art History Department.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..