Latin American Studies

www.cla.temple.edu/spanpor/las

Hiram Aldarondo, Chair, Spanish & Portuguese
427 Anderson Hall
215-204-1706
haldaron@temple.edu 

Ronald Webb, Faculty Advisor
817 Anderson Hall
215-204–7527
rwebb@temple.edu

Michelle Pugliese, Administrator
429 Anderson Hall
215-204-5628
pugliese@temple.edu

Annette Vega, Coordinator
428 Anderson Hall
215-204-2877
avega1@temple.edu

Latin American Studies is a diverse, interdisciplinary curriculum that includes a major, a minor and an opportunity for students to participate in the Latin American Studies Semester.

Latin American Studies Semester Certificate and Program (LASS)

Each spring semester, the Spanish and Portuguese Department offers a 17-credit immersion program in Latin American Studies and Spanish. The program (LASS) combines 9 hours of intensive Spanish with 6 hours of study focusing on geography, history, and culture in Latin America, 2 hours of the LASS Seminar, and a three-week trip to Costa Rica.  Successful completion of the program is awarded with a certificate of participation. Applications for LASS are received between April and November for the following spring. For information, please visit the program’s website or contact Dr. Hiram Aldarondo, Program Director (215-204-1706) or Dr. Patricia Moore-Martinez (215-204-1707).

Latin American Studies Courses

LAS 0825. Jewish Diaspora in Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

The coupling of the terms "Jew" and "Latino" or "Jewish" and "Latin American" still elicits surprise and disbelief, especially among those who grew accustomed to identifying "Jewish" with "Eastern European." In this course we will study the presence of Jews in Latin America, and the relationships between Jews and non-Jews in different Latin American countries. Using a variety of written sources, mainly literary and historical narratives, as well as music and cinema, we will discuss issues of identity, immigration, assimilation, Diaspora and nationalism. Class materials and discussions will be in English translation.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 0833. Race & Poverty in the Americas. 3 Credit Hours.

The transatlantic slave trade was one of the most brutal and momentous experiences in human history. Attitudes toward Latino, Caribbean, African, and Asian immigrants in the United States today can only be fully understood in the contexts of slavery and the "structural racism," "symbolic violence" (not to mention outright physical violence), and social inequalities that slavery has spawned throughout the region. Although focusing primarily on the United States, we will also study the present entanglements of poverty and race in Brazil, Haiti, and other selected nations of "The New World," placing the U.S. (and Philadelphia in particular) experience in this historical context. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ANTH 0833, LAS 0933, REL 0833/0933, or SOC 0833.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 0854. Latino Immigration. 3 Credit Hours.

Every year between 200,000 and 400,000 immigrants attempt to cross the US-Mexican border illegally. An estimated 11 million undocumented migrants live in the United States already. Does this influx of Mexicans, Central Americans and South Americans amount to a serious threat? Through close examination of how diverse towns, cities, and states throughout the United States have dealt with this influx of people we will explore global immigration issues. Case studies include Hazelton, PA; Kennett Square, PA; and the state of Arizona.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 0868. World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under the Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0968, Political Science 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 0968. Honors World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868, Political Science 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 1001. Perspectives on Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

Interdisciplinary examination of social change in Latin American societies. Provides historical context and includes changing approaches to economic development, class and ethnic issues, religious traditions, art, music, and literature. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 1022. Latin American Social Struggles. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of Latin America's contemporary history from the Cuban Revolution in 1959 through the end of the Cold War to the present. The course explores such matters as revolution and counter-revolution; human rights and institutional accountability; city life and social change; the movement of people, narcotics, goods; and new forms of political and cultural conflict. Methods of instruction include paperback readings, the internet, and video clips.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 1051. Che Guevara and the Question of Revolution. 3 Credit Hours.

Between the coming to power of the Cuban Revolution in 1959 and the early 1990s, Latin America found itself convulsed by revolution and counter-revolution. For many around the world, Che Guevara symbolized heroic revolutionary struggle. Through the prism of Che's life and image, this course will examine Latin America's conflicts during this era and discuss the urgent issues that still remain from the question of revolution.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2010. Topics in Latin American Studies I. 3 Credit Hours.

Course topics vary each semester and may include the media in Latin America, Latin American music, race and ethnicity, and social movements. NOTE: Students can obtain a description of the current version at the Latin American Studies Center.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 2020. Topics in Latino Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Course topics vary and may include the study of Latino migration to the United States, Latino communities in the United States, and Latino political and cultural movements. NOTE: Students can obtain a description of the current version at the Latin American Studies Center.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 2030. Topics in Caribbean Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Course topics vary each semester and may include the history of Puerto Rico, the history of the Hispanic Caribbean, culture and music of the Caribbean. NOTE: Students can obtain a description of the current version at the Latin American Studies Center.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 2040. Special Topics. 4 Credit Hours.

Topics vary each semester. Please consult with the instructor and/or check the course schedule for specific topic.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 2072. Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at the migration of Puerto Ricans to the United States in the 20th century, a group that is the second largest Hispanic group in the country. It examines the specific community of Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia and its relationship with other racial and ethnic groups and the social, political, and economic situation of Puerto Ricans in the city.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2097. Writing Seminar I. 3 Credit Hours.

Course topics vary each semester and may include the media in Latin America, Latin American music, race and ethnicity, and social movements. NOTE: Students can obtain a description of the current version at the Latin American Studies Center.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 2098. The Legacy of Mesoamerica. 3 Credit Hours.

The course briefly reviews the nature of Prehispanic Mexico and Central America by examining its earliest manifestations in the Pre-Classic Period through the Late Post-Classic Period, right before European contact. Cultures examined will include the Maya, Nahua, Tarascan, and Mixtec among others. We will then study the Spanish Conquest of the region and how the indigenous peoples adapted to Spanish rule during the Colonial period. Following independence from Spain, indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica dealt with a new sort of adaptation. Specifically, that of integration into the new nation-states of Mexico and Guatemala will be examined. Modern Mesoamerica will also be discussed, particularly in terms of how the indigenous peoples have adapted to a new "globalized" world.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2101. Latin America through Film and Fiction. 3 Credit Hours.

Economic and political change; role of institutional forces including the military and church. Cultural and intellectual traditions and trends, past and present. Multi-media approach. NOTE: Given in Spanish as part of the LASS program.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2169. Archaeology of South America. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of prehistoric cultures of South America. Concentrates on (1) the initial entry and spread of human populations into South America and the West Indies, (2) origins of tropical and highland agriculture, (3) the rise of urbanism, civilization, and the state in the Andes, and (4) the impact of prehistoric cultures on the environment.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2173. Ancient Mesoamerica. 3 Credit Hours.

Ancient Mesoamerica is a general survey of the pre-Columbian cultures of Mexico and Middle America before the Spanish Conquest of the Aztec Empire in A.D. 1521. In this course we will examine the long history of Mesoamerica beginning with the first peopling of the Americas at least 15,000 years ago and ending with the Spanish Conquest and the creation of "Latin America."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2220. Special Topics - LASS Seminar. 2 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor and/or check the course schedule for specific topic. NOTE: Given in Spanish as part of the LASS program.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 2231. Democracy in Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the structure and culture of Latin American democracies organized around three major themes: (1) a discussion of theories of democracy; (2) the formation and development of democratic institutions in Latin America; and (3) the political culture of Latin American democracy. Uses a social problems approach to look at two controversial Latin American issues since the late 1960's: the tension between adopting a procedural vs. a substantive definition of democracy, and the emphasis on political vs. socioeconomic factors in explaining democratization.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2232. Politics of Development in Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of Latin America's struggle for economic development. Emphasis on the relationships that have prevailed over the last few decades between developmental theories and the everyday lives of Latin American peoples. Discussion of the political and ideological questions involved in Latin American development. Exploration of how Latin American developmental issues affect the United States through matters such as job relocations and trade pacts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2361. Peoples of Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

Starting in 1492, Native American isolation from Europe and Africa ended in the region of the Americas that became Latin America. Despite five hundred years of colonial and nation-state domination, indigenous peoples in Latin America continue to assert their basic human right to resist cultural hegemony. Not only have indigenous populations survived, they are also growing. Today they constitute a majority in Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Peru and a substantial plurality in Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia. The focus here is on this remarkable struggle for physical and cultural survival. Attention will be given to the lived experiences of people struggling for human dignity on the lowest strata of regional class structures. Issues of land rights, environmental, health, political, and economic self-determination will be examined.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2362. Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean. 3 Credit Hours.

Shaped by conquest and colonial transnational desires, first of sugar and then of tourism, the Caribbean has been wrought since its very inception by the displacement of people, goods and ideas from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America, presenting a challenge for the anthropological study of socio-cultural change through time and space. In this introductory course on the Caribbean we will critically examine "creolization" processes at social, religious, political, economic, and artistic levels as they were driven by various groups, from pirates, privateers, maroons, exiles, to tourists, in the context of colonialism, nation building, and globalization. Examining specific sites such as music, display events, folklore, and religion we will ponder about, for instance, the effects of European revolutions on the creation of elites in the Caribbean, and the impact of slave cultures and peasantries on the formation of creole religions. How has the image of the sensuous/threatening mulatta evolved since the plantation? On what kind of histories and emotions do "zombies" feed upon? Why did Reggae and Merenge succeed on the global stage? How does the display of national icons in Trinidadian carnival reflect on their socio-political conflicts? How is the colonial past re-packaged for global consumption? Format: Seminar with short lectures, class presentations, video screenings and class discussions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2502. Fundamentals of Latin American Business. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to give students a solid basis to face a job assignment related to business in a Latin American country and to develop your ability to perceive the importance of cultural diversity and how it influences business activities across Latin American countries. Specifically, this course will help you understand the specific challenges of doing business in Latin America and enable you to perceive and understand the differences in the business environment, business customs, and business practices between countries of Latin America and of the rest of the world.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2512. Mexican Migration to the United States. 3 Credit Hours.

Illegal immigration remains a volatile and divisive question for the United States. Most discussions in the political system and in the mass media ignore the extensive history of Mexican migration to the United States. We will examine the pervasive influence of that history upon the present as well as the tight connections that exist between Mexican labor migration and phenomena that most US citizens prize-- the spread of American culture and influence abroad, international political stability, reliable domestic economic growth, and the availability of inexpensive goods and services. Instruction takes place through discussion, lecture, film, and computer projection. Readings include both primary documents stemming from historical events themselves as well as secondary academic studies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2514. Historical Continuity and Social Change in Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

Overview of Latin American history from a social change/social problems perspective. Some of the historical themes addressed include: social inequality and unequal exchange, cultural domination and resistance, racial minorities and indigenism, the role of women in Latin American societies, political imposition and democracy, and national independence.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2515. Civilization and Modernity in the Caribbean. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys post-Emancipation Caribbean history, regarding it as a complex process dominated by notions of "civilizing" and "modernizing." We will address the significance of both terms, exploring what they have meant for the diverse peoples inhabiting the region. What did civilizing mean for the labor practices and religious expressions of free blacks and indentured Indians in the late 19th century? What did modernizing mean for concepts of peoplehood, cultural production and representation in the 20th century? Who have been the primary agents of "civility" and "modernity"? And how have others responded to - resisted, embraced, negotiated - their efforts and ambitions? In answering these questions, we will turn to a range of disciplines including history, anthropology, literature and political science.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 2525. Maya Language and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to the language and cultures of the Maya area of Mesoamerica. Students will acquire basic conversational elements of one of the Maya languages, study Maya culture, including the indigenous literature of the area where applicable, and generally gain a deeper understanding of this diverse part of Latin America.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3010. Topics in Latin American Studies II. 3 Credit Hours.

Course topics vary each semester and may include the media in Latin America, Latin American music, race and ethnicity, and social movements. NOTE: Students can obtain a description of the current version at the Latin American Studies Center.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 3020. Topics in Latino Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Course topics vary and may include the study of Latino migration to the United States, Latino communities in the United States, and Latino political and cultural movements. NOTE: (1) Students can obtain a description of the current version at the Latin American Studies Center. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 3101. Latino Identity in the U.S.. 3 Credit Hours.

Latino Identity in the U.S. is a general survey of the cultural-historical experiences of Latinos in the United States from pre-colonization to the present with concentration on the time period of the civil rights movement to the present. The course will explore the impact of Latinos in U.S. cultural-history and artistic expressions, across all disciplines; specifically on how this impact has reflected itself in the development of Latino identity formation and how Latinos fit within race/ethnic/gender cultural politics in the United States.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3201. California Dreams, California Nightmares. 3 Credit Hours.

Over the century and a half since California was forcibly incorporated into the United States, it has exercised a powerful role upon the imagination and reality of every generation. California has been, at once, the golden gate of opportunity and the grapes of wrath of the downtrodden; social mobility and the policy of incarceration, the glamour of Hollywood and monotony of tract housing, the high-tech of Silicon Valley and the high-sweat of agricultural labor, the Eden of natural bounty and the ecological disaster of sprawl and smog. This course concentrates on the historical role that categories of race have played in defining by whose means, to whose benefit, and in whose image California's wealth would be produced and consumed. As an intermediate-level history course, this course offers a mix of primary and secondary sources, emphasizes the interaction of multiple causal factors, and encourages students to interpret and to write analytical historical arguments. In addition to discussion, lecture, and common readings, methods of instruction in the course include use of a computer-assisted classroom to provide image and text projections, video clips, and internet linkages. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3267. Sociology of Music: Nation, Race, Class and Gender in Argentina and Brazil. 3 Credit Hours.

The initial developments of the sociology of music were linked to the work of scholars who played pivotal roles in the history of sociology, such as Max Weber and Theodor Adorno. The sociology of Latin American music usually followed the theoretical developments occurring in the industrialized countries of the West, but, at the same time, it was characterized by a peculiar twist in the way it understood the complex relationship between music and society. In this course we delve into this important literature and grapple with the social and cultural foundations of music, with particular emphasis on the relationship between music and society in Brazil and Argentina. Due to the complex social organization of these two countries in terms of race, ethnicity, regionalisms, class, gender and religion, the course will explore the articulation of that complexity in the way people use music in their everyday life to understand who they are and what to do in the context of an ever changing social reality.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3561. History of Brazil. 3 Credit Hours.

Modern and contemporary Brazilian themes including democracy, globalization, and nationalism, cultural and ideological dissent, and popular social movements. Course materials include Brazilian writings, documents, and films. NOTE: Course title prior to fall 2009: "Contemporary Brazilian Scene."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3562. Contemporary Mexico. 3 Credit Hours.

Over the past several years, Mexico has become increasingly integrated with the United States economically, socially, and culturally; a phenomenon that has presented new challenges to both countries to organize this irreversible process constructively. We will look at the present-day questions between the United States and Mexico through the experience of Mexico's history since 1940. This period includes decades of industrialization, city growth, labor migration to the United States, cultural flourishing, political restlessness, the emergence of narcotics trafficking, and incorporation into the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This course concludes with some speculative considerations about the future. Instruction takes place through discussion, lecture, film, computer projection, and readings from the new historical scholarship that has emerged on post-1940 Mexico.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3563. Puerto Rican History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores particular issues related to the political, economic, and social development of Puerto Rico with special emphasis given to the 19th and 20th centuries. The course will not only address historical paragons but also questions of interpretations. In each class a combination of readings, discussion, lectures, and videos will be used to view the various issues in a comprehensive manner.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3566. Race, Gender, and Empire in the Iberian World. 3 Credit Hours.

Latin America is a culturally rich and diverse region. Its complex and fascinating history is the product of different worlds and cultures coming together in the 16th century. In this course we will analyze this encounter and its consequences by looking at two main topics: race and gender. Following a chronological order that starts with the conquest of the Americas by Spaniards and Portuguese in the 16th century and ends with the breakdown of the Spanish empire in the early 19th century, the course will explore the ways in which different peoples have interacted. We will discuss the various roles men and women assumed in these societies and the significance of race. In so doing, we will attempt a deeper analysis of the social dynamics of Latin America in the past that will give us a better understanding of its present and future. Note: For history majors, this course is in the "Global/Comparative" category.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3601. "Other Voices" in Latin American Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at race, color, and gender in Latin American creative literature. The literature explores key cultural dimensions of the Latin American society and psyche. Focus is on the presence of Afro-Latinos, the role of Indigenous peoples, and feminist perspectives in the different Latin American societies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3602. Caribbean Literature and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

The Caribbean is an immensely rich, virtually untapped cultural matrix for most North American students. This confluence of many old world cultures really is the brave new world, home of four Nobel laureates and a vast multi-lingual literature that runs in deep currents through our own national psyche. This course will focus on Caribbean artists and social movements that have had a major impact on modern culture, especially in the United States.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3702. African Religions and New World Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

African religion and culture continues to exist in the religious and cultural life of African Americans. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will examine African American religion, folklore, literature, music, and communication in order to assess the continuation and transformation of African culture in the world-view of African Americans.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3801. African Culture in Brazil. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the cultural history of Africans and their descendents in Brazil. Particular attention will be paid to the northeastern state of Bahia - the earliest and most important point of entry for Africans transported to Brazil during the Atlantic slave trade. Special focus will be paid to Bantu-Kongo culture of West Central Africa and to the Yoruba and Fon cultures of Western Africa transferred to Brazil from the late 16th through the 19th centuries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 4082. Independent Study. 1 to 9 Credit Hour.

Independent research on a specific topic related to Latin America. This course will enable undergraduate students the option of taking an independent study through the Latin American Studies Center.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

LAS 4097. Latin American Studies Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This course serves as the capstone for the Latin American Studies major. Students write a substantial research paper (20-25 pages) dealing with the general theme selected for the semester. This course is open to non-LAS majors with permission of the Director of Latin American Studies. Should be taken in the fall of the senior year. NOTE: Fulfills the Capstone writing course requirement for the Latin American Studies major. Special Authorization required for all students.

Field of Study Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of study: Latin American Studies
Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 4698. Revolutionary Mexico. 3 Credit Hours.

Early in the twentieth century, Mexico experienced a powerful upheaval that left its imprint upon the country for generations, bringing to the fore questions of constitutionalism, land tenure, worker rights, indigenous culture, and national sovereignty. The Mexican Revolution restructured society, the state, and the country's relationship with the United States and the world. Revolutionary Mexico examines the classic years of the Revolution, 1910-1940, engaging students in primary document research and in examination of the historical controversies that the Revolution has engendered. Instruction takes place through discussion, lecture, film, reading, and computer projection.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Portuguese Courses

PORT 1001. Basic I. 4 Credit Hours.

Basic Portuguese I is an introductory Portuguese course for students with little or no previous Portuguese experience. The course will develop basic skills for speaking, listening, reading, and writing as well as introduce students to the richness and diversity of Luso-Brazilian cultures. It combines regular classroom instruction and practice with Language Lab sessions dedicated to the use of instructional technology. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, course title was "Elements I."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PORT 1002. Basic II. 4 Credit Hours.

Basic Portuguese II is a continuation of the work begun in Basic I. The course further develops basic skills for speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and it continues the introduction to the richness and diversity of Luso-Brazilian cultures. It combines regular classroom instruction and practice with Language Lab sessions dedicated to the use of instructional technology. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, course title was "Elements II."

Course Attributes: LA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PORT 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PORT 1003. Intermediate. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a communicative intermediate Portuguese course. More sophisticated grammar will be introduced and students will continue to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing competencies. Class work will include discussions, videos, and writing. Students will take a more active role in their own learning process by using computer technology out of class to hone grammar skills and explore the multi-faceted world of Luso-Brazilian culture.

Course Attributes: LB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PORT 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PORT 1021. Portuguese for Spanish Speakers. 3 Credit Hours.

An intensive Portuguese course intended for students who have completed four semesters of instructional Spanish or have a native or native-like command of the language. There is emphasis on all basic skills for speaking, listening, reading, and writing, in addition to introducing the richness and diversity of Luso-Brazilian cultures. It combines regular classroom instruction and practice with Language Lab sessions dedicated to the use of instructional technology. This course meets the instructional objectives equivalent to Portuguese 1003. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, course title was "Concentrated Elements."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PORT 2001. Composition and Conversation. 3 Credit Hours.

The course devotes time to reading comprehension and oral expression, but the main thrust of the course is written expression using appropriate Portuguese grammar.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PORT 2002. Readings in Portuguese. 3 Credit Hours.

This course devotes time to speaking and writing skills, but the main emphasis is reading comprehension and interpretation of texts in Portuguese.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PORT 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PORT 2101. Conversational Review. 3 Credit Hours.

Portuguese 2101 is an intermediate conversation and grammar course that strengthens listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and reviews important grammar points. The main objective is to enhance proficiency in Portuguese in the four basic language skills, and to foster cultural literacy of the Portuguese speaking world. To achieve these ends, there will be grammar review, assigned homework, readings, and daily oral participation, as well as interactive presentations, videos and dialogues. The majority of class time will be dedicated to conversation in Portuguese through pair work, individual and group presentations, and classroom discussion. Students will also read short chronicles, stories, newspaper articles and poems written in Portuguese.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PORT 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PORT 1021|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PORT 2104. Portuguese for Business Professions. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will acquire the foundational knowledge of the language used in Portuguese-language business interactions, as well as business practices in the Portuguese-speaking world. Students will write business letters, participate in role-plays, and explore the nuances of doing business in Portuguese-speaking countries, in particular in Brazil.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PORT 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PORT 1021|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PORT 3101. Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Themes in Luso-Brazilian culture in the context of short prose readings, including the short story and the short novel. Emphasis on tools for advanced reading: vocabulary recognition, comprehension of idiomatic expressions, and knowledge of advanced grammar. Includes writing and oral discussion.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PORT 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PORT 3201. Portuguese-Speaking Cultures. 3 Credit Hours.

Diverse subjects in Brazilian and Portuguese studies fall under this rubric. In addition to readings of original texts, this course incorporates discussions on the central history, politics, society, and cultural aspects related to the foundation and development of both Portugal and Brazil. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Portuguese and Brazilian Culture and Civilization."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PORT 4000. Special Topics in Portuguese. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines specific topics in contemporary Brazilian and/or Portuguese culture, literature, or linguistics. Course content varies each semester to offer optimum exposure to new areas of study.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PORT 4083. Directed Reading. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Special readings of Portuguese by arrangement with a Portuguese faculty member.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
PORT 3000 to 3999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PORT 4101. Brazilian Short Story. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of Brazilian short stories from 1900 to the present. Selected texts introduce students to the work of major Brazilian writers of the genre. While focusing primarily on literary texts, the course will also draw attention to literary movements and major themes.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PORT 3000 to 3999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PORT 4102. Contemporary Portuguese and/or Brazilian Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of twentieth-century literary movements in Portuguese and/or Brazilian prose and poetry, such as pre-modernism, modernism, and regionalism with an emphasis on contemporary writers.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Spanish Courses

SPAN 0815. Language in Society. 3 Credit Hours.

How did language come about? How many languages are there in the world? How do people co-exist in countries where there are two or more languages? How do babies develop language? Should all immigrants take a language test when applying for citizenship? Should English become an official language of the United States? In this course we will address these and many other questions, taking linguistic facts as a point of departure and considering their implications for our society. Through discussions and hands-on projects, students will learn how to collect, analyze, and interpret language data and how to make informed decisions about language and education policies as voters and community members. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ANTH 0815/0915, Asian Studies 0815, Chinese 0815, CSCD 0815, EDUC 0815/0915, English 0815, Italian 0815, PSY 0815, or Russian 0815.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0825. Jewish Diaspora in Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

The coupling of the terms "Jew" and "Latino" or "Jewish" and "Latin American" still elicits surprise and disbelief, especially among those who grew accustomed to identifying "Jewish" with "Eastern European." In this course we will study the presence of Jews in Latin America, and the relationships between Jews and non-Jews in different Latin American countries. Using a variety of written sources, mainly literary and historical narratives, as well as music and cinema, we will discuss issues of identity, immigration, assimilation, Diaspora and nationalism. Class materials and discussions will be in English translation.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0826. Bilingual Communities. 3 Credit Hours.

What is the relationship between language and identity? How do bilinguals sort between their two languages and cultures to form their identity? In bilingual cultures, is one language always dominant? What happens when a language or dialect is distinct from the dominant language or dialect of the greater society? Why did language resurgence efforts fail in Ireland but succeed in Catalonia, Spain? Why does Guarani enjoy greater protection in Paraguay than Mayan dialects in Guatemala? Is it possible to legislate language behavior? The course explores issues of power and solidarity where two languages or dialects are in contact: How are these cultural identities expressed through choice of language? The geographical areas studied include the US, Canada, Latin America, Europe, and Africa. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Spanish 0926.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0831. Immigration and the American Dream. 3 Credit Hours.

As a Temple student, you go to school and live in a city full of immigrants. Perhaps your own relatives were immigrants to the United States. But have you ever listened to their stories? With an historical and sociological framework as a basis, we will take an in-depth and more personal look at the immigrant experience as expressed through the immigrants' own voices in literature and film. Topics explored include: assimilation, cultural identity and Americanization, exploitation and the American Dream, ethnic communities, gender, discrimination and stereotyping. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ANTH 0831, CRIT 0831, History 0831, Italian 0831/0931, Russian 0831, SOC 0831, or SPAN 0931.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0837. Eating Cultures. 3 Credit Hours.

You are what you eat, they say, but what, precisely, determines our eating habits and what, exactly, do they say about us? How do these habits influence our relations with others in our communities and beyond? Eating is an activity common to all human beings, but how do the particularities and meanings attributed to this activity vary across different times and places? Using literature, visual media, cookbooks, food-based art, and advertisements as our starting point, we will examine how food perception, production, preparation, consumption, exchange, and representation structure individual and communal identities, as well as relations among individuals and communities around the globe. Our focus on this most basic of needs will allow us to analyze how food conveys and limits self-expression and creates relationships as well as delimits boundaries between individuals and groups. Materials will be drawn from a wide range of disciplines including, but not limited to, literary and gender studies, psychology, anthropology, history, sociology, and economics. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0837 or Spanish 0937.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0868. World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, Spanish, Latin American, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Spanish, Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Political Science 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0968.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0926. Honors Bilingual Communities. 3 Credit Hours.

What is the relationship between language and identity? How do bilinguals sort between their two languages and cultures to form their identity? In bilingual cultures, is one language always dominant? What happens when a language or dialect is distinct from the dominant language or dialect of the greater society? Why did language resurgence efforts fail in Ireland but succeed in Catalonia, Spain? Why does Guarani enjoy greater protection in Paraguay than Mayan dialects in Guatemala? Is it possible to legislate language behavior? The course explores issues of power and solidarity where two languages or dialects are in contact: How are these cultural identities expressed through choice of language? The geographical areas studied include the US, Canada, Latin America, Europe, and Africa. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Spanish 0826.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GB, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0931. Honors Immigration and the American Dream. 3 Credit Hours.

As a Temple student, you go to school and live in a city full of immigrants. Perhaps your own relatives were immigrants to the United States. But have you ever listened to their stories? With an historical and sociological framework as a basis, we will take an in-depth and more personal look at the immigrant experience as expressed through the immigrants' own voices in literature and film. Topics explored include: assimilation, cultural identity and Americanization, exploitation and the American Dream, ethnic communities, gender, discrimination and stereotyping. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ANTH 0831, CRIT 0831, History 0831, Italian 0831/0931, Russian 0831, SOC 0831, or SPAN 0831.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GD, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0937. Honors Eating Cultures. 3 Credit Hours.

You are what you eat, they say, but what, precisely, determines our eating habits and what, exactly, do they say about us? How do these habits influence our relations with others in our communities and beyond? Eating is an activity common to all human beings, but how do the particularities and meanings attributed to this activity vary across different times and places? Using literature, visual media, cookbooks, food-based art, and advertisements as our starting point, we will examine how food perception, production, preparation, consumption, exchange, and representation structure individual and communal identities, as well as relations among individuals and communities around the globe. Our focus on this most basic of needs will allow us to analyze how food conveys and limits self-expression and creates relationships as well as delimits boundaries between individuals and groups. Materials will be drawn from a wide range of disciplines including, but not limited to, literary and gender studies, psychology, anthropology, history, sociology, and economics. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0837 or Spanish 0837.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GB, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 0968. Honors World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, Spanish, Latin American, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Spanish, Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Political Science 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 1001. Basic I. 4 Credit Hours.

Basic Spanish I is an introductory Spanish course for students with little or no previous Spanish experience. The course will develop basic skills for speaking, listening, reading, and writing as well as introduce students to the richness and diversity of Spanish-speaking cultures. Daytime sections on Main Campus combine regular classroom instruction and practice with Language Lab sessions dedicated to the use of instructional technology. Other sections provide all instruction in the regular classroom.

Course Attributes: LA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 1002. Basic II. 4 Credit Hours.

Basic Spanish II is a continuation of the work begun in Basic I. The course further develops basic skills for speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and it continues the introduction to the richness and diversity of Spanish-speaking cultures. Daytime sections on Main Campus combine regular classroom instruction and practice with Language Lab sessions dedicated to the use of instructional technology. Other sections provide all instruction in the regular classroom.

Course Attributes: LA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP C1002|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP B1002|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP C1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP B1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 1003. Intermediate. 3 Credit Hours.

Intermediate Spanish is a communicative course. More sophisticated grammatical concepts will be introduced and students will continue to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing competencies. Class work will include discussions, videos, and writing. Students will take a more active role in their own learning process by using computer technology out of class to hone grammar skills and explore the multi-faceted world of Hispanic culture.

Course Attributes: LB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP C1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP B1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 1011. Heritage Spanish I. 3 Credit Hours.

Designed for the needs of heritage speakers of Spanish with little or no formal training in Spanish. Spelling, accentuation, and standard sentence-level grammar plus opportunities for Spanish conversation. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Language Skills for Spanish Speakers."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 1076. Intensive Practice in the Four Skills. 9 Credit Hours.

Intensive practice in Spanish. Methods, materials, and small class sections are tailored to the varied linguistic needs of the students. Given in conjunction with Latin American Studies 2101 (0100), Latin America through Film and Fiction; and Sociology 2163 (0163), Area Studies. This combination of language study, area study (taught in Spanish), and a field trip opportunity to use Spanish in a total-immersion atmosphere affords a unique opportunity for personal enrichment and language acquisition.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 1901. Honors Basic I. 4 Credit Hours.

Basic Spanish I is an introductory Spanish course for students with little or no previous Spanish experience. The course will develop basic skills for speaking, listening, reading, and writing as well as introduce students to the richness and diversity of Spanish-speaking cultures. Daytime sections on Main Campus combine regular classroom instruction and practice with Language Lab sessions dedicated to the use of instructional technology. Other sections provide all instruction in the regular classroom.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, LA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 1902. Honors Basic II. 4 Credit Hours.

Basic Spanish II is a continuation of the work begun in Basic I. The course further develops basic skills for speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and it continues the introduction to the richness and diversity of Spanish-speaking cultures. Daytime sections on Main Campus combine regular classroom instruction and practice with Language Lab sessions dedicated to the use of instructional technology. Other sections provide all instruction in the regular classroom.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, LA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP C1002|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP B1002|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP C1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP B1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 1903. Honors Intermediate. 3 Credit Hours.

Intermediate Spanish is a communicative course. More sophisticated grammatical concepts will be introduced and students will continue to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing competencies. Class work will include discussions, videos, and writing. Students will take a more active role in their own learning process by using computer technology out of class to hone grammar skills and explore the multi-faceted world of Hispanic culture.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, LB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP C1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP B1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 2001. Conversational Review. 3 Credit Hours.

The main thrust of this course is oral practice with grammar review for the purpose of improving the non-native student's oral communication skills.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 1903|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 2002. Hispanic Readings. 3 Credit Hours.

This course devotes time to speaking and writing skills, but the main emphasis is reading comprehension and interpretation of texts in Spanish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 2011. Heritage Spanish II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course enhances and strengthens control of standard Spanish grammar and orthography through the study of representative samples of essays, prose, poetry, business letters, formal written communiqués, etc., in Spanish. Develops vocabulary recognition and writing skills focusing on the paragraph and the short essay. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Advanced Skills for Spanish Speakers."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1011|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 2096. Composition. 3 Credit Hours.

This course devotes time to reading comprehension and oral expression, but the main thrust of the course is written expression using appropriate Spanish grammar and orthography. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Composition and Conversation."

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 2098. Advanced Intensive Practice in the Four Skills. 9 Credit Hours.

The nine-credit Advanced Intensive Practice in the Four Skills course of the Latin American Studies Semester (LASS) is designed to help students develop writing skills through a variety of analytical and creative assignments. To accomplish this goal the course reviews grammatical structures previously studied and introduces other new structures. Students will work on strategies for correcting errors, and on improving the organization and clarity of their own writing. Oral participation in this class is very important: we will discuss the texts we read in order to analyze their content, structure, and aesthetics. These texts will also help students to expand their vocabulary and improve their spelling. Only Spanish will be spoken in class. Duplicate Credit warning—previously known as Spanish 2076.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 2201. Catalan Language for Spanish Speakers. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to the study of Catalan language. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the vocabulary, grammar and language usage of Catalan. It is a comprehensive overview of Catalan grammar, in combination with the development of listening, reading, writing and oral communication skills. Moreover, it introduces students to the richness and diversity of Catalan culture. It is intended for students with a background in Spanish (i.e., they have completed four semesters of instructional Spanish or have native or native-like command of the language). Thus, it is a transition course between the two languages.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 2901. Honors Conversational Review. 3 Credit Hours.

The main thrust of this course is oral practice with grammar review for the purpose of improving the non-native student's oral communication skills.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 1903|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 2902. Honors Hispanic Readings. 3 Credit Hours.

This course devotes time to speaking and writing skills, but the main emphasis is reading comprehension and interpretation of texts in Spanish.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3001. Advanced Composition & Conversation. 3 Credit Hours.

Continued development of conversation and writing skills. Special attention is given to advanced areas of Spanish grammar appropriate for oral argumentation and expository writing and also to distinctions between formal and informal usage.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3002. Hispanic Readings II. 3 Credit Hours.

Themes in Hispanic culture in the context of short prose readings, including the short story and the short novel. Emphasis on tools for advanced reading: vocabulary recognition, comprehension of idiomatic expressions, and knowledge of advanced grammar. Includes writing and oral discussion.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3003. Advanced Grammar for Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

Emphasizes advanced grammar (including distinctions of tense, aspect and mood; reflexive and passive usage; and pronoun selection). Attention is paid to Spanish/English contrasts. Grammar skills are developed in conversation and in reading and writing. Students are also introduced to linguistic concepts that will help them make their own judgments about grammar and pronunciation. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Advanced Grammar and Linguistic Concepts."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3096. Advanced Analysis and Writing Skills. 3 Credit Hours.

Students read short stories and other brief narrative texts, plays, poems and essays in order to facilitate their acquisition of critical skills and to identify basic ideological and formalistic issues within the texts being studied. This course teaches how to become a careful reader and writer. Reading comprehension and writing are its essential aspects. Compositions are written and revised. The course is a prerequisite for most advanced Spanish offerings. This is a critical thinking course and a capstone writing course. NOTE: Cornerstone to the Spanish major and capstone writing course.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3000 to 4999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 3121. Introduction to the Literature of Spain. 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of major works of Spanish literature. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Introduction to Spanish Literature." Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Masterpieces of Spanish Literature."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3141. Introduction to the Literature of Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of major works of Spanish American literature. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Introduction to Spanish American Literature." Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Masterpieces of Spanish American Literature."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3142. Puerto Rican Readings. 3 Credit Hours.

This course entails the study of selected works by major Puerto Rican writers.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3160. Special Topics I. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of language, literature, culture or other areas of special interest in the Hispanic world. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Special Topics in Spanish and/or Spanish American Literature."

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3201. Catalan Culture and Civilization. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to the study of Catalan culture. The term "Catalan culture" in the strictest sense refers to the various artistic, intellectual and popular manifestations of the social interactions encountered in those geographical lands populated by Catalan-speaking peoples (located on the eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula and parts of France and Italy). Through the analysis of original texts, films and visual artifacts, the course will incorporate discussions on the history, politics, society, cinema, anthropology and the arts of the Catalan-speaking regions. The course is intended to strengthen the students' reading skills, to broaden their vocabulary, and to increase cultural and literary awareness by reading, discussing and writing about the various cultural topics introduced in class. The course will be taught in Catalan.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

SPAN 3204. Latin America through Film. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to present a multicultural view of Latin American life through Latin American film. It includes the artistic appreciation and the critical analysis of the films viewed.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3221. The Cultures of Spain. 3 Credit Hours.

The Spanish character as revealed in its language, literature, architecture, history, art, music, and ethnic traditions. Geography and sociology of Spain. Lectures, readings, and discussions. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Spanish Culture and Civilization."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3222. Spain through Film. 3 Credit Hours.

This course develops Spanish-language skills in their application to the study of the culture of Spain through film. It includes the artistic appreciation and analysis of the films viewed. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Contemporary Spain through Film."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3241. The Cultures of Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the Spanish-American people through their literature, history, architecture, art, music, and European/indigenous traditions and institutions. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Spanish-American Culture and Civilization."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3243. The Culture of Puerto Rico. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of topics and themes of Puerto Rican culture and civilization in the context of literary and non-literary texts. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Puerto Rican Culture and Civilization."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3261. The Hispanic World. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines what is different about Hispanic society and its multifaceted mentality. To address these questions, it focuses on topics including ethnic struggle, linguistic diversity, and intellectual and artistic creativity, as well as on the relationship between Spain, Latin America, and Latino society in the U.S. Spanish language skills are developed through conversation and writing. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "The Hispanic Mind."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3401. Translation Skills. 3 Credit Hours.

Translation skills through familiarity with different types of language taken mainly from Spanish newspapers: reporting, sports, columns, advertisements, correspondence, etc. Models of each and their inherent problems in translation. Essays on translation to examine theories of translation.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3402. Interpretation Skills in Translation. 3 Credit Hours.

Style, techniques, and mechanics of translation focusing on texts relating to the subject areas of law, business, social issues, public health, and education. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Translation Skills II."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3501. Spanish for Business Professions. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to aspects of the Spanish language and Hispanic culture for business students and business professionals. Emphasis on the development of vocabulary and conversation skills.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 1903|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3502. Business Spanish I. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction in Spanish to basic business concepts (relating to company structure, accounting, banking, etc.) with a focus on Spanish vocabulary and writing skills for business. Attention to applications in Spanish-speaking countries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3503. Business Spanish II. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination in Spanish of business concepts focusing on finance, marketing, and international business, including import and export. Emphasis on vocabulary and writing skills for business. Attention to awareness of Hispanic culture and applications in Spanish-speaking countries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3504. Advanced Business Translation and Interpretation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will have two components: (1) emphasis on written translation (English-Spanish and Spanish-English), and (2) interpreting skills. Students will have an opportunity to translate a variety of texts including: business correspondence, banking and financial documents, as well as promotional and informational materials. Interpreting will involve various kinds of oral work. The course concentrates primarily on consecutive interpreting (English-Spanish and Spanish-English), but sight translation and oral summary of texts used in a typical business context will also be practiced (for example, renting a property, opening a bank account, or filling out a survey). It builds on the work done in Spanish 3401 and 3402.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3402|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3601. Spanish for Health Professions. 3 Credit Hours.

This course assists medical and related human-services personnel and students in interacting and communicating effectively with Spanish-speaking people. Conversation skills, cultural information, and medical and social-services terminology are integrated as they apply to real situations. Students practice verbal and non-verbal skills in simulated role-playing situations. Moreover, the course is designed to assist medical personnel in the acquisition of Spanish medical vocabulary. The delivery of services to the Hispanic community is of foremost importance. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Spanish for Health and Human Services."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCSP EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3602. Medical Spanish. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to assist medical personnel in the acquisition of Spanish medical vocabulary, strategies of communication and cultural knowledge to assist in the delivery of services to the Hispanic community.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3701. Spanish for the Legal Professions. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students and legal professionals with technical vocabulary and communicative skills in a legal context. Special emphasis is paid to oral and written communication, and aural comprehension in a variety of legal contexts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 3960. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of language, literature, culture or other areas of special interest in the Hispanic world. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Honors Special Topics in Spanish Literature."

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SPAN 3996. Honors Advanced Analysis and Writing Skills. 3 Credit Hours.

Students read short stories and other brief narrative texts, plays, poems and essays in order to facilitate their acquisition of critical skills and to identify basic ideological and formalistic issues within the texts being studied. This course teaches how to become a careful reader and writer. Reading comprehension and writing are its essential aspects. Compositions are written and revised. This is a critical thinking course and an honors writing course. (This course is the honors version of Spanish 3096.)

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3000 to 4999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 4020. Special Topics II. 2 Credit Hours.

A comprehensive study of language, literature, culture or other areas of special interest in the Hispanic world. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Topics in Spanish and/or Spanish American Literature."

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SPAN 4060. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

A comprehensive study of language, literature, culture or other areas of special interest in the Hispanic world.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

SPAN 4083. Directed Readings. 2 Credit Hours.

Guided readings at the 4000 level in Spanish, focusing on themes and topics in Hispanic culture, literature and/or linguistics. NOTE: By arrangement with appropriate professor and special permission of department chair.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4121. Survey of Spanish Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of selected periods and themes in Spanish literature.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4123. 16th & 17th Century Spanish Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to the study of the literature produced during what has been called the Golden Age of Spanish Literature. Although there is special emphasis on the genre of prose, emblematic texts from various genres will be included: chivalric and pastoral novels, Renaissance dialogues, picaresque treatises, and women's texts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4126. Cervantes. 3 Credit Hours.

An in-depth study of Miguel de Cervantes' life and selected works. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Cervantes' Don Quijote."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4127. 18th and/or 19th Century Spanish Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to the study of Spanish literature during the 18th and/or 19th century. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Poetry and Drama of the 19th Century."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4128. Hispanic Modernism. 3 Credit Hours.

Using significant works by leading authors (i.e., Martí, Unamuno, Valle-Inclán, Casal, Gutiérrez Nájera, Machado and/or Jiménez), this course explores aspects of Modernity in Spain and/or Spanish America. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Generation of 1898."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4132. 20th &/or 21st Century Spanish Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to the study of Spanish literature during the 20th and/or 21st century. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Contemporary Spanish Novel."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4133. Hispanic Women in Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of the presence of women as authors and/or characters in Spanish and/or Spanish American literature. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "The Female Presence in Peninsular Literature."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4141. Survey of Spanish American Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of selected periods and themes in Spanish American literature.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4142. Spanish American Short Story. 3 Credit Hours.

The evolution of the Spanish American short story.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4143. Spanish American Novel. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores aspects of the Spanish American novel across time, and highlights trends introduced and developed in different texts. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Latin American Novel."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4144. Spanish American Poetry. 3 Credit Hours.

Trends in Spanish American poetry through representative poems and poets. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Latin American Poetry."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4146. National Literatures of Spanish America. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of literature in its cultural context focusing on texts from a selected country or countries of Spanish America. NOTE: The country of choice will vary according to the instructor's preference.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4147. 20th and/or 21st Century Puerto Rican Authors. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of 20th and/or 21st century Puerto Rican authors. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "20th Century Puerto Rican Authors."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4148. Latin American Literature of Social Conflict. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of class, ethnic, gender, and other social conflicts in Latin American literature.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4149. Literature of Colonial Spanish America. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of the literature of Colonial Spanish America. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Literature of Colonial America."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4151. Literature of the Caribbean. 3 Credit Hours.

A comparative study of representative literary works from Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and non-Spanish-speaking nations of the Caribbean. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Comparative Caribbean Literature."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4152. U.S. Latino/a Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

An exploration of literature, history, race, ethnicity, gender and language among Latinos/as in the United States. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "U.S. Latino Literature."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4161. Hispanic Literature through Art. 3 Credit Hours.

Comparative study of Hispanic literature in the context of trends and styles in the history of Art.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4162. Hispanic Nobel Laureates. 3 Credit Hours.

Readings from selected writers from Spain and Latin America who have received the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4182. Independent Study. 1 to 4 Credit Hour.

An independent-study course arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4183. Directed Readings. 3 to 6 Credit Hours.

Guided readings in Spanish, at the 4000 level, focusing on themes and topics in Hispanic culture, literature and/or linguistics. NOTE: By arrangement with appropriate professor and special permission of department chair.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4221. The Art of Spain. 3 Credit Hours.

A panoramic view of the art of Spain from two perspectives: the chronological and the geographic. The chronological perspective includes artistic and architectural work from the paleolythic period (the Caves of Altamira) to the present time. The geographic perspective examines work from Asturias, in the north, to Sevilla and Granada in the south and Barcelona on the Mediterranean coast of Spain.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4240. Topics in Hispanic Popular Cultures. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of manifestations of Hispanic popular culture.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4242. Hispanic Influences in the U.S.. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines contemporary U.S. Latino literature and writers. Students will examine the evolution of Latino literature and its themes, and examine the experiences of Latino writers and their impact on U.S. culture. Coursework will include lectures, readings, films, papers and class discussions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4301. The Sounds of Spanish. 3 Credit Hours.

An articulatory study of the sounds of Spanish with attention to regional variation and comparisons with English. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Spanish Phonetics."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 3003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 4302. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics. 3 Credit Hours.

Concepts and procedures of linguistic description applied to sounds, words, and sentence patterns of the Spanish language.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 3003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 4303. Spanish/English Bilingualism. 3 Credit Hours.

A contrastive linguistic study of Spanish and English sound and grammatical systems. Appropriate for students and teachers of Spanish in the context of the U.S. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Spanish / English Contrasts."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 3003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 4304. Spanish Applied Linguistics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore a number of theories accounting for language learning from classical times to the present. Students will examine not only the teaching of Spanish in accordance with these theories, but also the acquisition of Spanish by the second language learner.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 3003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 4305. Evolution of the Spanish Language. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of chronological developments in the linguistic and social history of Spanish. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "History of the Spanish Language."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 3003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 4306. Spanish Sociolinguistics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the study of language in society as represented in sociolinguistic research from Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Emphasis is on linguistic variation.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 3003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 4307. Language and Gender. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the relationship between language use and social gender, i.e., of women's and men's speech. Language is examined from the perspectives of sounds, grammatical structures, semantic positioning, and conversational strategies with illustrations based on the use of Spanish and other languages.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(SPAN 3003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

SPAN 4401. Advanced Translation and Interpretation. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced specialized textual translation and interpretation. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "The Art of Translation."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4449. Medieval Spanish Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of Spanish texts written during the Middle Ages. NOTE: Prior to fall 2009, the course title was "Medieval Spanish Text."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 3996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

SPAN 4885. Service Learning. 3 Credit Hours.

Work on site in the Spanish-speaking community combined with in-class discussion of the work experience and of readings focusing on the Spanish language in the U.S. and Latino culture. NOTE: Prior to summer 2015, the course title was "Internship."

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
SPAN 2096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SPAN 2098|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.