History

www.cla.temple.edu/history

Dr. Jay Lockenour
Chairperson
jay.lockenour@temple.edu

Dr. Rita Krueger
Director of Undergraduate Studies
919 Gladfelter Hall
rita.krueger@temple.edu

Dr. Travis Glasson
Honors Advisor
842 Gladfelter Hall
travis.glasson@temple.edu

Anne K. Eckert, Administrator
1008A Gladfelter Hall
215-204–9209
ake@temple.edu

Vangeline Campbell
911 Gladfelter Hall
215-204–7839
vcampbel@temple.edu

The faster our lives change, the more we need to understand our past, reflect on our present, and make decisions for our future. History helps us to understand who we are and where we came from. It provides unique insights and perspectives for our personal and professional pursuits.

The History Department divides its courses between American History, European History, and non-Western History. Within each division, one can choose history courses in political, diplomatic, social, cultural, economic, gender, and ethnic history.  Students should concentrate in one field of history and also be well-versed in the three main divisions.

Temple History graduates have gone into a wide range of careers; business, law, politics, education, historical preservation, and information resources are just a few of the many areas. History arms the student for a maximum amount of flexibility for career choices.

Temple students regularly participate in the intellectual life of the region through their connections to such organizations and institutions as the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies, the Pennsylvania Historical Society, the Atwater Kent Museum, and the American Philosophical Society.

The Department of History offers an Honors Program for majors with outstanding academic records. Qualified majors are invited to join Phi Alpha Theta, the History honor society. Both minors and majors participate in the Undergraduate History Association. Special Programs allow undergraduates to major in History and earn teaching certification, or to major in History and earn a Master's in Education in five years (program administered through the School of Education).

Courses

HIST 0824. Gender and World Societies. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about the history of feminine and masculine gender roles from comparative and international perspectives. Using case studies from Ancient Greece, Medieval Europe, West Africa, Victorian Britain, Modern Europe, the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, and/or Latin America, we will explore certain themes - The State, The Sacred, Work, The Family, The Body and Sexuality, Modern Revolutionary Movements - to investigate how gender and gender roles have changed over time, and their significance today. Readings include primary sources written both by men and by women, secondary sources, novels, and films. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies 0824; History 0824, 1708, C065; Women's Studies 0824, 1708, or C065.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0829. The History & Significance of Race in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Why were relations between Native Americans and whites violent almost from the beginning of European settlement? How could slavery thrive in a society founded on the principle that "all men are created equal"? How comparable were the experiences of Irish, Jewish, and Italian immigrants, and why did people in the early 20th century think of them as separate "races"? What were the causes and consequences of Japanese Americans' internment in military camps during World War II? Are today's Mexican immigrants unique, or do they have something in common with earlier immigrants? Using a variety of written sources and outstanding documentaries, this course examines the racial diversity of America and its enduring consequences. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: African American Studies 0829, Africology and African American Studies 0829, Anthropology 0829, Geography and Urban Studies 0829, History 0829, Political Science 0829, Sociology 0829, 0929, 1376, 1396, R059, or X059.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0831. Immigration and the American Dream. 3 Credit Hours.

As a Temple student, you go to school and live in a city full of immigrants. Perhaps your own relatives were immigrants to the United States. But have you ever listened to their stories? With an historical and sociological framework as a basis, we will take an in-depth and more personal look at the immigrant experience as expressed through the immigrants' own voices in literature and film. Topics explored include: assimilation, cultural identity and Americanization, exploitation and the American Dream, ethnic communities, gender, discrimination and stereotyping. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ANTH 0831, CRIT 0831, Italian 0831/0931, Russian 0831, SOC 0831, or SPAN 0831/0931.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0832. Politics of Identity in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Gay or straight. Black or white. Male or female. What do these different group identities mean to Americans? How do they influence our politics? Should we celebrate or downplay our diversity? This course explores how we think about others and ourselves as members of different groups and what consequences it has for how we treat one another. Our fundamental social identities can be a source of power or of powerlessness, a justification for inequality or for bold social reform. Students learn about the importance of race, class, gender and sexual orientation across a variety of important contexts, such as the family, workplace, schools, and popular culture and the implications these identities have on our daily lives. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies 0832/0932, Political Science 0832, Sociology 0832 or Women's Studies 0832/0932.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0834. Representing Race. 3 Credit Hours.

From classical Greeks and Romans, who saw themselves under siege by the "barbarian hordes," to contemporary America and its war on "Islamic extremism," from "The Birth of a Nation" to "Alien Nation," Western societies have repeatedly represented some group of people as threats to civilization. This course will examine a wide range of representations of non-Western people and cultures in film, literature, scientific and legal writings, popular culture and artistic expression. What is behind this impulse to divide the world into "us" and "them"? How is it bound up with our understanding of race and racial difference? And what happens when the "barbarian hordes" talk back? NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed African American Studies 0834, Africology & African American Studies 0834, Anthropology 0834/0934, Asian Studies 0834, or English 0834/0934.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0847. American Military Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

You live in a country that possesses the world's strongest military forces. Up through the Vietnam War, Americans viewed military service in wartime as a basic obligation for all adult male citizens - the ultimate test of their patriotism and manhood - but a temporary sacrifice that ceased for most on the return of peace. Today, the American people have outsourced their awesome war-making power to a restricted number of men and women - many of whom consider military service their career. We will explore the distinctive culture that shapes the composition and behavior of America's armed forces and probe how it reflects the strengths and weaknesses of American society. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed AMST 0847.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0848. American Revolutions. 3 Credit Hours.

From the first encounters with Native Americans to the present, a series of pivotal moments have had an enduring influence on American society, culture, and politics. In each class, three modules will focus on three pivotal moments, such as King Philip's War, Nat Turner's Rebellion, the Scopes trial, the Civil Rights movement, the women's movement, the emergence of Elvis Presley, the sexual revolution, the rise of environmentalism, the Reagan Revolution, and 9-11. In each module, students will first place the main subject of the module in context, and then seek to understand how it changed American society. The last week of each module will be devoted to a consideration of how the subject of that module has become part of American collective memory. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: AMST 0848, ANTH 0848, GUS 0848, or SOC 0848.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0849. Dissent in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Throughout American history individuals and groups of people have marched to the beat of a different drummer, and raised their voices in strident protest. Study the story and development of dissent in America. How has dissent shaped American society? In addition to studying the historical antecedents of dissent, students will have first-hand experience visiting and studying a present-day dissent organization in the Philadelphia area to investigate connections between the history of dissent and the process of making dissenting opinion heard today. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0849/0949, History 0949 or SOC 0849/0949.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0859. The Making of American Society: Melting Pot or Culture Wars?. 3 Credit Hours.

Terrorism, illegal immigration, gay marriage, religious conflict, political in-fighting, corporate corruption, racial animosities, civil liberties assaults, media conglomeration, Wal-Mart goes to China and the rich get richer. America in the 21st century is a contentious society. How did we get to this place in time? Examine what makes American society distinctive from other advanced industrial democracies as we study the philosophical origins of America, the development of social and economic relationships over time, and the political disputes dominating contemporary American life. The course relies heavily on perspectives from History, Sociology and Political Science to explain the challenges facing contemporary American society. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: AMST 0859, PHIL 0859, POLS 0859, or SOC 0859.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0861. Global Slavery. 3 Credit Hours.

Investigate global slavery as an historic phenomenon and a current reality. How is it that after the great emancipation movements of the 19th century and the International Geneva Convention (1926) outlawing slavery there are still 27 million slaves and counting? This course argues that any critique of globalization requires an understanding of why it has taken several millennia for anti-slavery law to emerge and why such legislation continues to have limited reach and effectiveness. It argues that there is no modernity and no globalization without slavery. Explore this problem by asking a basic question: By what techniques, abstract and concrete, do masters make themselves as visible by constructing slaves as invisible? With film viewings, carefully selected readings, debates and group projects, you will be led to make your own connections to these themes, and to consider global slavery as part of the past and the present. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0862. Development & Globalization. 3 Credit Hours.

Use historical and case study methods to study the differences between rich and poor nations and the varied strategies available for development in a globalizing world. Examine the challenges facing developing countries in historical and contemporary context and analyze the main social, cultural, and political factors that interact with the dynamic forces of the world economy. These include imperialism/colonialism, state formation, labor migration, demographic trends, gender issues in development, religious movements and nationalism, the challenges to national sovereignty, waves of democratization, culture and mass media, struggles for human rights, environmental sustainability, the advantages and disadvantages of globalization, and movements of resistance. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: GUS 0862, POLS 0862/0962, or SOC 0862/0962.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0864. War and Peace. 3 Credit Hours.

Total war, weapons of mass destruction, genocide. These were not solely inventions of the 20th century nor are they the natural consequences of a violent human nature. Leaders, armies, and the strategies they pursue are rooted in their social and political context. Weapons are the products of not merely technological but also historical and cultural development. Battles occur on a political and historical terrain. Learn how ancient ideology, medieval technology, modern propaganda, and more have changed how humans wage war and make peace. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for History 0864 if they have successfully completed History 0964 or POLS 0864.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0865. The Global Crisis: Power, Politics and the Making of Our Times. 3 Credit Hours.

Are we living in a time of global crisis? This course will provide you with the tools you need to find out. The course focuses on world politics over the past century, up to today. We will examine a number of key global problems as they have changed over time. We will adopt an historical approach, which means we will read texts and documents about the past as a way to understand the present. Together we will explore debates like: Is America an empire? What is ideology and is it a factor in world politics today? What role do diplomacy, strategy, and military power play in world affairs? How have non-western peoples and states challenged the power of the West, and with what results? What are the roots of ethnic and religious conflict? And what can we as citizens do to address truly global problems? Drawing on examples from 20th century world history, this course introduces you to world politics and the great debates of our time. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0866. World Affairs. 3 Credit Hours.

We live in a global age when events beyond our borders significantly affect our lives. Sharpen your understanding of international developments, including wars, economic globalization, wealth and poverty, the spread of democracy, environmental degradation, and global pandemics. This course offers an introduction to the study of world affairs that gives you the conceptual tools to deepen your understanding of how major historical and current trends in the world affect your life and that of others around the globe. Readings include historical documents, classic texts in the study of international relations, and current perspectives on the state of the world from multiple disciplinary perspectives. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: GUS 0866 or POLS 0866/0966.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0867. Founding Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the important role of Philadelphia in the founding of the United States. It will not be, however, a mostly nostalgic visit to patriotic historical sites that glorify the founding fathers, but an in-depth examination into the actual social, cultural, and political events that shaped a city and a nation, as well as an evaluation of how we view these historical events and figures today. Is there a great discrepancy between myth and reality? What does our view of the past say about the present? In what ways can Philadelphia be viewed as a microcosm of the United States and in what ways does the development of Philadelphia, through political turmoil, industrial growth, and the creation of ethnic neighborhoods by a constant flood of immigrants tie in with global developments?

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0871. Turning Points in Human History: The Ancient World. 3 Credit Hours.

Turning Points in Ancient History explores five of the most significant transformations in human life from 1) our evolution into Homo sapiens sapiens, to 2) the agricultural revolution, 3) the establishment of the first human settlements, from villages to early cities, 4) the formation of the first empires, and concluding with 5) the establishment of the first religions with representation throughout Afro-Eurasia. (A second course will continue with five turning points in modern history.) The course looks at world history whole, asking how we have become who we are through our global history. It compares societies to foster analysis. It also examines interactions among societies to foster synthesis. The analysis of primary and secondary documents will be central to this course, along with study of secondary sources commenting on them. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0872. Turning Points in Human History: The Modern World. 3 Credit Hours.

Turning Points in Modern History explores five of the most significant transformations in human life from 1) the establishment of world trade networks following Columbus' voyages, to 2) the democratic revolutions of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, 3) the industrial revolution in global perspective, 4) the growing significance of ecological balance, and 5) the search for identity in contemporary history. (Another course, which is not a requirement for this one, will cover five turning points in ancient history.) The course looks at world history whole, asking how we have become who we are through our global history. It compares societies to foster analysis. It also examines interactions among societies to foster synthesis. The analysis of primary and secondary documents will be central to the course, along with study of secondary sources commenting on them. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0874. Confronting Empire: Voices of Resistance. 3 Credit Hours.

What is "empire"? For millions of people throughout history, this is not just an academic question but a lived reality. In this class, you will confront the realities of empire, and you will observe ways that many others have confronted empire in the past. To find out what empire means, this class will introduce students to Asian, African and Latin American people whose lives have been shaped by Western colonial rule from the 18th to the 20th centuries. What was it like to live as a colonized person in the age of empire? What kind of power did one have to lead a free life? What sorts of opposition and resistance was available to colonized peoples? How has the struggle between colonized peoples and the powerful imperial states shaped the world we live in today? And do we still live in a world that has colonial dimensions to it? In this class, we will listen to the voices of those who experienced Western imperialism and follow them as they confronted and challenged that process. We bring together a variety of sources including speeches, newspapers, novels, films, and government documents to reconstruct specific moments of collective action on the part of the colonized. We will explore how this struggle carries on today. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0876. Religion in Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

The argument is sometimes made that religion in dense urban spaces is characteristically very different from religion as it appears elsewhere. A study of religion in Philadelphia provides numerous ways to explore that idea, especially since the city encompasses a variety of ethnic and immigrant groups, encouraging the generation of new and hybrid forms of religious life that are less possible in smaller populations. Learn how ideas of toleration and freedom, the urban environment, and immigration helped to define the role of religion in the life of this city. Study various religious traditions as they are manifested in the greater Philadelphia area and look at the influences religion has had on the fabric of Philadelphia's history and cultural life including politics, art, education, journalism and popular culture. You will visit and write about various religious sites and institutions. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed REL 0876, 0976, 1003, 1903, C052, H092 or History 0976.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0929. Honors: The History & Significance of Race in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Why were relations between Native Americans and whites violent almost from the beginning of European settlement? How could slavery thrive in a society founded on the principle that "all men are created equal"? How comparable were the experiences of Irish, Jewish, and Italian immigrants, and why did people in the early 20th century think of them as separate "races"? What were the causes and consequences of Japanese Americans' internment in military camps during World War II? Are today's Mexican immigrants unique, or do they have something in common with earlier immigrants? Using a variety of written sources and outstanding documentaries, this course examines the racial diversity of America and its enduring consequences. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: African American Studies 0829, Africology and African American Studies 0829, Anthropology 0829, Geography and Urban Studies 0829, History 0829, Political Science 0829, Sociology 0829, 0929, 1376, 1396, R059, or X059.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GD, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0949. Honors Dissent in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Throughout American history individuals and groups of people have marched to the beat of a different drummer, and raised their voices in strident protest. Study the story and development of dissent in America. How has dissent shaped American society? In addition to studying the historical antecedents of dissent, students will have first-hand experience visiting and studying a present-day dissent organization in the Philadelphia area to investigate connections between the history of dissent and the process of making dissenting opinion heard today. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0849/0949, History 0849 or SOC 0849/0949.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GU, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0964. Honors War and Peace. 3 Credit Hours.

Total war, weapons of mass destruction, genocide. These were not solely inventions of the 20th century nor are they the natural consequences of a violent human nature. Leaders, armies, and the strategies they pursue are rooted in their social and political context. Weapons are the products of not merely technological but also historical and cultural development. Battles occur on a political and historical terrain. Learn how ancient ideology, medieval technology, modern propaganda, and more have changed how humans wage war and make peace. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for History 0964 if they have successfully completed History 0864 or POLS 0864.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0976. Honors Religion in Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

The argument is sometimes made that religion in dense urban spaces is characteristically very different from religion as it appears elsewhere. A study of religion in Philadelphia provides numerous ways to explore that idea, especially since the city encompasses a variety of ethnic and immigrant groups, encouraging the generation of new and hybrid forms of religious life that are less possible in smaller populations. Learn how ideas of toleration and freedom, the urban environment, and immigration helped to define the role of religion in the life of this city. Study various religious traditions as they are manifested in the greater Philadelphia area and look at the influences religion has had on the fabric of Philadelphia's history and cultural life including politics, art, education, journalism and popular culture. You will visit and write about various religious sites and institutions. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed REL 0876, 0976, 1003, 1903, C052, H092 or History 0876.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GU, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1001. History of Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended as an introduction to the history of Philadelphia, broadly defined as the region as well as the city, and assumes no background or deeply developed interest in American history. It presents a general survey that can pique the curiosity of anyone who wants to explore one of the nation's most exciting cities, but it is also meant to be especially useful to students imagining careers in such diverse fields as hospitality and tourism, journalism and education, environmental studies and law. The course will examine both how national and international events (say, the Revolution or the rise of the modern global economy) impacted the city, and also how the city experienced forces (like the adoption of the automobile) that transformed it.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1002. America in the Age of Lincoln. 3 Credit Hours.

This course uses Abraham Lincoln's extraordinary life as a prism through which to view the Civil War era. We will read and analyze Lincoln's legendary speeches and other primary sources, and sample the vast scholarship on his political career and personal life. We will debate his views on slavery, emancipation, civil liberties, and military strategy, and evaluate his record and his legacy as a leader.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1003. History of the American West. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the American West as a place of conquest, as a largely desert environment quite unlike the East, and as an icon of American culture. Through lecture, reading, and discussion, we will explore these three overlapping themes: 1) cultural encounters in the West, among Euroamericans, Indians, Mexican-Americans of the Southwestern borderlands, and Asian immigrants to the Pacific Coast; 2) the reciprocal relationship between people and the environment; and 3) the cultural symbolism of the American West, both as an enduring national icon and as an ideology that has shaped settlement.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1004. United States at War. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a survey of the rise of the American military establishment from its origins as a small, neglected cadre of coastal and frontier guardians to a mighty world police force and the most expensive concern of the federal government. Emphasis will be placed on the development of military policy, the principles of war, and the inter-relationship between military affairs, technology, politics, and social change.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1005. Youth, Romance, and Sex in post-WWII America. 3 Credit Hours.

American understandings of what is appropriate sexual and romantic behavior for youth changed dramatically over the second half of the 20th century - as did the actual behavior of young people. In this course we will try to understand why those changes took place and how the meanings of 'romance' and 'sex' have been struggled with in our recent past. This course is also an introduction to the study of history: students will work extensively with primary documents, do oral histories, and analyze different scholarly interpretations of the same set of events.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1006. History of Sex and Gender in Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will analyze mainstream, popular films produced in the post-WWII 20th century U.S., treating them as cultural texts that shed light on the ongoing historical struggles over gender identity and appropriate sexual behaviors. The course focuses on a volatile and complicated period in America's history: the years from World War II through the present. In those years, America's social-sexual mores and our ideas of masculinity and femininity (as well as our definitions of appropriate gender roles) have changed dramatically, but not without controversy. In watching and analyzing films that millions of Americans saw when they were first released, we will try to understand how these films fit into ongoing conversations about sex and gender in specific historical eras.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1007. Popular Culture in 20th Century America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the roles that stereotypes, fashions, sports, the automobile, movies, radio, television, and leisure activities, have played in 20th century American culture, and the manifestations of political and cultural life that the artifacts and leisure activities of the average American exemplified. A knowledge of the history and development of popular culture reveals the roots of modern American society and culture, and explains why Americans have not only developed in a unique way, but why their cultural influence has been so great on a global scale. As such, the course allows students to gain a broader view of American society while providing depth and clarity of understanding of it through areas not usually addressed by more traditional avenues of learning. Toward this end, students will write a research paper on a topic in popular culture using written, oral, and visual materials. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the student's topic through an analysis of historical context, asking a proper historical question, analyzing multiple historical factors, and formulating historical arguments.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1008. The Sixties: The American Experience. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the history of the United States in the Sixties era with a major focus on struggles for social justice, the Vietnam War, and the counterculture. Through readings, films, guest speakers, lectures, and discussion, we will tackle the great controversies and debates of the era.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1011. Modern U.S. History Through Film. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine aspects of U.S. history in the 20th century through the use of public released feature motion pictures. In this visually oriented society, every student encounters images of history and culture on an almost daily basis. Critical thinking about the visual media must be learned. Every motion picture is a primary document that can be read, interpreted, and studied with as much depth as a written document. Because of their complexity, however, motion pictures reveal a vast array of contemporary attitudes specific to their period. A series of motion pictures will be shown illustrating different aspects of American history, and students will learn to critically examine these historical documents for different levels of meaning. They will analyze not only the surface plots of the films, but the underlying historical assumptions that provided the intellectual underpinning of the movies. They will write papers based on their abilities to analyze the visual documents and fashion an historical argument.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1022. Latin American Social Struggles. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of Latin America's contemporary history from the Cuban Revolution in 1959 through the end of the Cold War to the present. The course explores such matters as revolution and counter-revolution; human rights and institutional accountability; city life and social change; the movement of people, narcotics, goods; and new forms of political and cultural conflict. Methods of instruction include paperback readings, the internet, and video clips.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1041. Before the Da Vinci Code: The Holy Grail. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to acquaint students with the interlinked problems of cultural violence, history writing, and the invention and popularity of Grail romances in 12th century Europe. The Grail romance cycle emerged in the wake of violence perpetrated by Christian Crusaders who traveled to the Eastern Mediterranean to capture Jerusalem and other pilgrimage sites from their Muslim rulers. We will study how the Grail story stages a crisis in chivalric masculinity and enacts fierce contests over knowledge, power, capital, and religious difference endemic in 12th and 13th century Europe. We will also explore why the Grail never lets go in the Western imaginary. We will study how bits and pieces of the Grail story recycled themselves in imperial fantasies of the 19th century, in Nazi Germany, as well as post-War new-Nazi fantasies, up to the Da Vinci Code.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1043. Living Royally: The World of Europe's Kings and Queens. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed as an introduction to the history, culture, and politics of the European royal court in the pre-1800 period. We will be examining the court as a social institution and a network of privilege and patronage; the court as a physical space that determined access to power, as well as the court as a practical challenge that included the staffing, provisioning, and organization of a household of this size and importance; and the court as the household of the royal family and court nobility. This will include investigation of the sexual, cultural, and social world of the royal family, as well as the rituals and ceremonies associated with noble power and royal kingship.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1045. Sex in 20th Century Europe: Panic and Liberation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the 20th century history of sexual attitudes, desires, behaviors, identities, communities, and movements in western Europe (most notably Germany, France and the United Kingdom). We will focus on the period from the 1920s until today, years when celebrations and concerns about sexual liberation, hedonism, the 'decline of virtue', the end of repression, etc., have been constantly at the center of political, social, religious and scientific debates. Among the topics covered are reproduction, fertility, birth control, and abortion; prostitution and commercialized sex; sexually-transmitted diseases; interracial and interethnic sexualities; and same-sex (homo-) and cross-sex (hetero-) sexualities. We explore the importance of sexuality in history and the ways in which the study of sexuality offers opportunities to re-think major themes in the social, cultural, and political histories of the West.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1051. Che Guevara and the Question of Revolution. 3 Credit Hours.

Between the coming to power of the Cuban Revolution in 1959 and the early 1990s, Latin America found itself convulsed by revolution and counter-revolution. For many around the world, Che Guevara symbolized heroic revolutionary struggle. Through the prism of Che's life and image, this course will examine Latin America's conflicts during this era and discuss the urgent issues that still remain from the question of revolution.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1061. The United States and the Middle East, 1990-Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to one of the most important global problems facing the United States, namely, its relations with Middle Eastern peoples and states. It begins with the U.S. involvement in the defeat of the Soviet Union in Afghanistan and moves on to look historically at American conflict with Iraq in the 1990s, the Arab-Israeli problem, and the challenge presented by the geopolitical contest over oil supplies. The U.S. involvement in the region has had huge consequences for the Middle East and South Asia as well as for the American people. The course will use a variety of sources to introduce students to the background of these contemporary conflicts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1062. Power and Resistance in the Age of Imperialism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces key themes and issues in the study of both modern imperialism and the opposition and challenges to it emanating from the third world/global South, past and present. Bringing together a variety of primary and secondary source materials, the course examines case studies and specific moments of collective struggle drawn from the disarticulated sites labeled the "third world." It spotlights anti-imperialism as a unifying axis of multidimensional opposition, but also reveals the radically democratic aspirations and efforts to achieve participatory social justice that have formed points of commonality among third world people. As such, it develops the tools for comprehending third world peoples as historic agents in the shaping of alternative modernities and imaginings about the end of empire, and through their confrontations as key actors thwarting and destabilizing the imperialist project in the modern world. NOTE: Prior to fall 2011, the course title was "Confronting Empire: Imperialism, Resistance, and the Third World."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1101. U.S. History to 1877. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, United States History to 1877, traces the historical roots of what is now the United States of America: the Mississippian development of agriculture and urban life, the competition of various empires over land and peoples, the successes and failures of European settlements, the forced migration of West Africans and the invention of enslavement and race. By 1776, the United States of America was formed under promises of liberty, equality, property rights, and tolerance. But who would benefit? Who should rule? Partial industrialization, the consolidation of slavery, agricultural specialization, and expansion to the west, along with demands for reform and democracy, made these questions ever more vexed and led to a Civil War and a flawed attempt to reconstitute the Union by 1877. There are no prerequisites. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1102. U.S. History since 1877. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a general survey of the main currents in American history since 1877. Since the 1870s, the people of the United States have struggled over the meaning of equality, the practice of democracy, the politics of economic development, and the role of the United States in the world. This course will explore these themes and others in order to analyze the history of the modern United States. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1103. Race and Ethnicity in American History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course deals centrally with the social process by which societies create racial and ethnic groups and define their place in relation to other racial or ethnic groups. Because the emergence of racial and ethnic groups is a historical process, the course will examine American history from the colonial period to the present in order to understand the changing ways that Americans have viewed each other and divided into groups. In short, the course will be rooted in specific processes in American history, but will examine how America formed groups that are given power and prestige, recognized as real Americans, discriminated against, marginalized, enslaved or killed. The groups to be examined include, but are not limited to, Blacks, Native Americans, Irish-Americans, Italian-Americans, Chinese-Americans, Jews, and Chicanos. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1104. American Empire. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys and interprets the creation and growth of the American empire from the colonial era to contemporary times. In doing so, it addresses the fundamental questions of how and why a republic, founded on the lofty principles concerning liberty and equality eloquently expressed in the Declaration of Independence, behaved so aggressively in pursuing territorial and commercial aggrandizement, including the subjugation and in some cases extermination of peoples and nations. The course will also examine the instruments the United States employed to expand its influence and dominion. These include traditional means like force, diplomacy, and economics, and less orthodox methods and agents, ranging from missionaries to movie moguls to the Marlboro Man. Consequently, a major challenge of this course will be both to arrive at an appropriate definition of empire, and further, to identify the constituencies from within the private as well as public sectors, and to a degree from the international community, that contributed to the realization of George Washington's vision of the United States as a rising empire.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1171. U.S. History to 1877. 1 Credit Hour.

A companion course to History 1101 (C067) for first-term freshmen. This course provides guidance with the assignments of the core course. Emphasis is on reading, listening, speaking, and writing within the context of the core course. Assistance is also given in the continued development of English-language skills, especially academic reading and the acquisition of a general academic vocabulary. NOTE: Offered at Temple University Japan only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1202. U.S. History Since 1877. 1 Credit Hour.

A companion course to History 1102 (C068) for first-term freshmen. This course provides guidance with the assignments of the core course. Emphasis is on reading, listening, speaking, and writing within the context of the core course. Assistance is also given in the continued development of English-language skills, especially academic reading and the acquisition of a general academic vocabulary. NOTE: Offered at Temple University Japan only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1301. Modern Europe. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on major developments in Europe from the 18th through the 20th centuries. Europeans in this period gave shape to the modern state system, spurred the industrial revolution, and founded global empires. They also triggered revolutions, engaged in constant warfare with each other and many non-European peoples, and gave birth to new ideologies such as Communism, Fascism, and Nazism. During this period, Europe also made important advances in science, technology, the humanities and the arts that gave shape to the modern world. This course surveys these developments by drawing on the work of contemporary historians as well as a wide array of primary sources, including novels, memoirs, musical and visual materials. The course provides a basic foundation for further course work in any field of modern history. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1501. Third World History. 3 Credit Hours.

Third World History offers a form of global history since 1500 that focuses upon the Third World, approximately three-quarters of the world's population whose experience has been powerfully shaped by colonialism and imperialism as well as by resistance to these forces. The historical issues raised in the course constitute some of the most fundamental elements shaping the present-day world as well as the immediate future. Particular attention is given to the 20th century. Assignments in the course are concerned with both historical issues and with the development of student analytical and writing skills. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1652. Modern Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the incursions of Western imperialism, nationalism and independence movements, and postcolonial developments in South, Southeast, and East Asia. It will explore continuity and change in state, society, and culture in the major countries and regions. As in Asian Studies 1051 "Premodern Asia," comparisons will shed light on similarities and differences in patterns of cultural adaptation and the diversity of Asian cultures and institutions. This course is cross-listed with Asian Studies 1052.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1701. World History Ancient. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to world history from earliest times until the 15th century. The course surveys the birth of agriculture, early human settlements, the establishment of cities and "civilizations," the organization of global cultural and religious systems, the power and authority of massive empires, the influence of business interests, and "border peoples" on the fringes of the great systems. The scope is global, and we always ask "How do we know?" and "What is its significance?" NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1702. World History Modern. 3 Credit Hours.

This course begins with Columbus' voyages, which linked the major trading regions of the world together, and continues through the expansion of imperialism, the revolts against excessive government power and authority, and the invention of astonishing new technologies of creativity and destruction. The course concludes with the formation of new international, national, religious, and gender identities in the last few decades. We analyze economics, politics, technology, culture, religion, and innovative ideas as formative influences. We always ask "How do we know?" and "What is its significance?" as well as "What do we know?" The course serves as an introduction to modern world history that students can build upon in subsequent course work. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1705. War and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores history through the prism of wars, their origins and consequences--with a focus on social, economic, technological, and cultural changes and their correlations with the nature of warfare. Various incarnations of the course examine virtually all regions of the globe, over time periods ranging from the prehistoric to the contemporary. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1708. Gender and History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce you to the history of feminine and masculine roles from a comparative international perspective. It will cover basic facts, concepts, and themes relating to six topics: The state, the sacred, work, the family, the body, and modern social movements (feminism, women's suffrage, pacifism, and socialism), using as case studies Ancient Greece, Medieval Europe, West Africa, Modern Europe, and the United States. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1900. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 1901. Honors U.S. History to 1877. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines major themes in American history from the early 17th century to the last quarter of the nineteenth century. The period includes some of the most important developments and events in American history: encounters between Native Americans and European colonists, the formation of colonial societies, the American Revolution, the making of the new republic, the beginning of industrialization, the settlement of the West, and the Civil War. One of the themes that unite this long period is the formation of the American political philosophy within a pluralistic society, and Americans' struggles to fulfill the promises inherent in its revolutionary political philosophy. There are no prerequisites. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: AC, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1902. Honors U.S. History since 1877. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a general survey course of the main currents in American history since 1877. Since the 1870s, the people of the United States have struggled over the meaning of equality, the practice of democracy, the politics of economic development, and the role of the United States in the world. This course will explore these themes and others in order to analyze the history of the modern United States. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: AC, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1903. Honors Race and Ethnicity in American History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course deals centrally with the social process by which societies create racial and ethnic groups and define their place in relation to other racial or ethnic groups. Because the emergence of racial and ethnic groups is a historical process, the course will examine American history from the colonial period to the present in order to understand the changing ways that Americans have viewed each other and divided into groups. In short, the course will be rooted in specific processes in American history, but will examine how America formed groups that are given power and prestige, recognized as real Americans, discriminated against, marginalized, enslaved or killed. The groups to be examined include, but are not limited to, Blacks, Native Americans, Irish-Americans, Italian-Americans, Chinese-Americans, Jews, and Chicanos. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1904. Honors War and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores history through the prism of wars, their origins and consequences--with a focus on social, economic, technological, and cultural changes and their correlations with the nature of warfare. Various incarnations of the course examine virtually all regions of the globe, over time periods ranging from the prehistoric to the contemporary. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1908. Honors Gender and History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce you to the history of feminine and masculine roles from a comparative international perspective. It will cover basic facts, concepts, and themes relating to six topics: The state, the sacred, work, the family, the body, and modern social movements (feminism, women's suffrage, pacifism, and socialism), using as case studies Ancient Greece, Medieval Europe, West Africa, Modern Europe, and the United States. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 1980. Honors: Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 1997. Honors World History Ancient. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of History 1701 (C061). History 1997 is a writing-intensive course. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a university Core International Studies (IS) and Writing Intensive (WI) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2102. History of Nazi Germany. 3 Credit Hours.

This course studies the rise and decline of Hitler's Third Reich, from its intellectual origins in the 19th century and World War I, through the meteoric rise of the National Socialist movement during the early 1930's, to its demise in the ruins of Berlin in 1945. Special attention is given to the sources of support for Nazism among German voters, the structure of the National Socialist state, the role of Adolf Hitler, the Holocaust, and the causes and consequences of the Second World War. Duplicate credit warning: Students who have taken HIST 1046 will not receive credit for taking HIST 2102.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2103. African American History to 1865. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the activities of African Americans in America from slavery to 1865. Among the topics to be studied are: Slavery, The American Revolution, and the Civil War. In addition, much attention will be devoted toward emphasizing the multi-dimensional aspect of the African American Community, and the crucial role which African American women have played in America will be stressed. The course will focus on themes and questions which are essential to an understanding of the past and to an understanding of the present struggles for full citizenship on the part of African Americans. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2104. African American History 1865-Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the activities of African Americans in America from Reconstruction to the present. Among the topics to be studied are: Reconstruction, the evolution of African American leadership, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black Power. In addition, much attention will be devoted toward emphasizing the multi-dimensional aspect of the African American Community, and the crucial role that African American women have played in America will also be stressed. The course will focus on themes and questions, which are essential to an understanding of the past and to an understanding of the present struggles for full citizenship on the part of African Americans. This course meets the university Studies in Race requirement. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2105. Race and the U.S. Constitution. 3 Credit Hours.

The central focus of the course is how the issue of race has shaped the history of the United States Constitution and how constitutional law contributed to the history of ideas about race in the United States. We study the origins of the law of race and slavery in the pre-revolutionary period and end with understanding the origins of affirmative action in the post-World War II period. Students will read various books about U.S. Constitutional history in order to understand various interpretations of historical events and ideas about race. Student will also read original court cases about racial minorities in order to develop an understanding of original historical texts. Many of the skills emphasized in the class prepare students for law school, public service, and analyzing the historical roots of contemporary issues. Class discussion about constitutional issues is designed to give students confidence and precision in public speaking. Students will also write book reviews in order to develop an understanding of how historians collect evidence in order to construct historical interpretations and to develop their own interpretations of historical events and their personal writing skills. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2106. Trials in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine American history through the lens of significant trials. Most trials are legal actions that settle quarrels or determine the guilt or innocence of an individual or group accused of a crime. But during the course of American history there have been numerous trials that reflect cultural/social/political issues much more than the ostensible guilt or innocence of the defendant. The Salem Witchcraft trials, for example, tell us much more about the cultural and social milieu of colonial Massachusetts than they do about the practice of witchcraft. The Dred Scott case was not about the status of one man, but about the legitimacy of slavery. The Scopes trial was a battle between forces of modernism versus forces of traditionalism, not about John Scopes. The O.J. Simpson trial was more about race and the legacy of racism than about murder. These are a few of the trials we shall examine. How important are such trials as a force in history? Do trials resolve conflict or do they fuel conflict? When do trials reflect state, or federal, coercion? When does public opinion determine the outcome of a trial?

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2107. Asian American History. 3 Credit Hours.

An introductory survey of the historical experiences of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, South, and Southeast Asian immigrants in the United States. Considers economic, social, political, and cultural trends, beginning with the arrival of the Chinese in the 1830s and ending with issues facing Asian-Americans today. Includes the development and significance of Asian-American communities and culture as well as approaches to the study of Asian-Americans in racial hierarchies. The aims of the course are to analyze commonalities and differences in the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian ethnic groups and to explore perspectives on the position of Asians in U.S. society - assimilation, model minority, institutional racism, and internal colonialism. Instructional methods include lectures and audio-visual materials, but they also emphasize active student participation in learning through discussion, oral reports, and written assignments. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2108. Growing Up in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the changing perception and experience of growing up in the United States from colonial times to the present. It will argue that childhood and adolescence are social constructions that change over time. The course will explore the emergence of childhood and adolescence as distinct stages in the life cycle, the evolving role of the family in the process of growing up, and the increasing importance of social institutions other than the family in the lives of the young. Particular attention will be paid to the difference between growing up rich or poor, black or white, male or female, and rural or urban. Finally, it will consider the reciprocal relationship between popular culture and the lives of young Americans.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2109. Sexuality and Gender in American History. 3 Credit Hours.

How do sexuality and gender shape the way a society views the behavior of men and women? How do they create images and stereotypes of ideal or "typical" female and male behavior? And how do the ways in which people actually act compare to the society's conventional ideas about how they ought to act? This course takes us from the beginning of the 19th century to the present, exploring the social, cultural, and political dimensions of the public and private roles of women and men in the United States. It examines changing cultural values and social norms of masculinity and femininity and considers the actual behavior of women and men in the family, at work and at play, in love, and in the life of the nation. It also probes the ways in which race, social class, and sexual orientation have affected the experience of gender.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2111. Recent American History. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to describe the political, social, and economic changes that the United States has experienced in making the transition from the Cold War era to the post-Cold War (and post-industrial) society of the late 20th century. The subject matter should be of interest to students in Education, Journalism, Urban Studies, and Psychology, as well as History majors. The course covers the entire period since World War II, but there is more emphasis on social change since 1970. Topics covered include: the origins of the Cold War; anti-Communism in American society and politics; the Civil Rights movement; the Vietnam War and anti-war movement; conservative backlash; Nixon and Watergate; the rise of a post-industrial economy; post-industrial social trends (gender, race, and the new immigration); and the growing impact of media on society and politics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2117. History of Global Soccer. 3 Credit Hours.

In 2010, Franklin Foer published a book with the audacious title: "How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization." In it, Foer explained how certain features of our "globalized" world can be better understood by better understanding soccer. This course will examine how soccer's past and present connect to forces and trends that have shaped history since the modern game's "invention" in England in 1863. Soccer tells us about race, economics, empire, gender, and of course sports in the modern world. It is connected to nation and tradition, to international business, to organized crime, to hooligan violence. Readings and assignments drawn from Europe, South America, Africa, and the United States will inform expert and novice students alike about "the beautiful game" (as it is known in Portuguese) and at the same time the world around them.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2118. Dissent in America. 3 Credit Hours.

A central aspect of a democratic society is the constitutional guarantee that all citizens possess freedom of speech, thought and conscience. Throughout American history individuals and groups of people, often times vociferously, marched to the beat of a different drummer, and raised their voices in strident protest. This course focuses on the story and development of dissent in America. How has dissent shaped American society? Why is it that some people never buy into the American Dream? How has dissent molded groups of people within American society and, indeed, even transformed individuals? This course will look at such historical figures as Anne Hutchinson, Roger Williams, Mary Dyer, Henry David Thoreau, David Walker, Susan B. Anthony, Randolph Bourne, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Allen Ginsberg, Abbie Hoffman, Timothy Leary, George Lincoln Rockwell, Timothy McVeigh, Ani DiFranco, Cindy Sheehan and others who have dissented from mainstream America.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2151. Introduction to Public History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the field of public history. It begins by surveying the history of the field and its various realms of professional practice. Subsequent units concern the challenges of doing history with diverse audiences, the value of historical interpretation in public contexts, and best practices for public historians. Throughout, special emphasis is placed on issues such as historical resource management, museum practice, digital history, and other facets of the dissemination of public memory. Students discover who manages our shared heritage while learning to think critically about its place in society. And because Philadelphia has figured so prominently in the history and practice of public history, the city will play a central role in readings and assignments.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2152. Museum History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the history of museums, from their origins in the memory theaters and curiosity cabinets of Renaissance Europe to their recent place in conversations about nation, power, and the future of public funding for arts and culture. Although our focus will sometimes be theoretical--especially with regard to the philosophy of collecting, the construction of memory, and competing concepts of the "public"--we will also consider the practicalities of museum management with an eye toward exploring career paths for students. Philadelphia is itself a museum of museums and will therefore provide the backdrop for our investigation. As a result, we will pay particular attention to the history of the museum in America and especially the place of history museums in shaping our ideas about the nation's past and its future.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2153. Memory and Commemoration. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the history of memory and remembering, particularly in the United States from the American Revolution to the present. We will undertake a broad survey of the various ways that Americans have gone about remembering their past(s) while exploring why and how those memories are made real by monuments, museums, and other commemorative architecture. A central concern of this course is to understand how memory functions in the construction of American nationalism. Special attention will also be given to contests of memory wherein competing ways of remembering collide along lines of gender, race, class, and ethnicity.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2207. Religion in the Modern United States. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the ways in which religious beliefs and practices have influenced the history of the United States in the years between 1898 and the present. Special attention is paid to lived religion, church-state relations, the relationships between religion and social power, the invention of the Judeo-Christian tradition, and the rise of new religious movements (such as Pentecostalism, the Nation of Islam, and Wicca).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2212. History of the American Presidency. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines historical developments in the office of the U.S. president from its establishment to contemporary times. Through lectures, discussions, class projects, and outside assignments, we will explore the historical literature dealing with the creation and evolution of the office; the presidents who have shaped the office; the powers and limitations of the office in both foreign and domestic affairs; the president's relationship to the courts, the Congress, the people, and the press; and the broad political developments essential to our understanding of the place of the presidency within our changing political culture. This course asks: How has our most important national political institution come to be what it is? Two themes permeate the course: (1) What is the source and nature of presidential power? (2) Who are the men who have held the office and why have they failed or succeeded? This course prepares students for further historical or other academic studies and for related professional careers in law, journalism, or executive management. More importantly, the course engages students' concerns as life-long participants in American democracy. Duplicate credit warning: Students who have taken HIST 1013 will not receive credit for taking HIST 2212.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2213. History of the American Economy and American Business. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to provide the student with a history of the development of the American economy with an emphasis on the part which business played in its development. Topics covered include the agricultural economy; the rise of manufacturing; the development of the corporation, the stock exchanges, finance capitalism, and the rise of banking; 19th century business cycles; the expansion of the American corporation in the years between the Civil War and the Great Depression; the overseas expansion of business and the development worker's capitalism in the 1920s; the changes produced by the Great Depression and the Second World War; and the rise of the modern economy with its trans-national connections, the movement towards deregulation, and the move from manufacturing to a service economy. Students will be introduced to a number of skills aimed at making them better able to understand the current American economy, to the use of historical data as a means of judging current trends in finance and business, and to some of the major web sites and journal literature on the subject. They will make written and oral presentations in which they defend their ideas, take a mid-term and a final exam, both of which will require students to answer essay questions, and write a short paper (10-15 pages) on a historical topic dealing with business or economic issues.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2214. History of the National Park Service. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine ideas that have shaped the National Park Service and its mission. It will introduce students to key events and figures responsible for creating the National Park Service that played critical roles in its development. Particular focus will be placed on significant legislation bearing on the agency's function, turning points in its institutional evolution, genesis of bureaucratic hierarchies and process, origins and evolution of its interpretive strategies and the relationship over time between the agency and broad currents in American history. Note: For history majors, this course is in the American history category.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2215. Imperiled Promise: An Introduction to Heritage Interpretation in the National Park Service. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys theory and method in heritage interpretation, which refers broadly to the various techniques used by the National Park Service to communicate the significance of its historical resources. Students will study the history of heritage interpretation, examine the challenges that confront it today, and consider new paths forward. Although this course serves Temple's ProRanger program, it will also appeal to students interested in public history, museum studies, communication studies, and education.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2216. U.S. Civil War. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will present a detailed survey of the causes, conduct, and immediate consequences of the American Civil War, the bloodiest conflict in United States history. Special emphasis will be placed on the sectional, racial, political, and economic differences that culminated in the dissolution of the Union, the formation of the Confederate nation, strategy and tactics, the personalities of major Union and Confederate commanders and statesmen, the role of Abraham Lincoln in preserving the Union, and the federal government's conflicting and ultimately unsuccessful efforts to reconstruct Southern politics and society.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2217. Vietnam War. 3 Credit Hours.

The Vietnam War is a microcosm of the forces that have shaped the 20th century world: colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, revolution, modernization, nation building, Third World development, capitalism, communism, the cold war, and more. It was a defining moment for both Americans and Vietnamese, although the peoples of neither nation can agree on what precisely it defined. For the United States, the loss of the war produced a crisis of national identity. For Vietnam, the victory meant the culmination of thirty years of revolutionary struggle. To the present day both suffer from the failure to resolve problems inherent in these outcomes. This course is designed to emphasize the war as a problem for both Americans and Vietnamese. The question will be why almost complete strangers prior to World War II became such bitter enemies so soon thereafter, and as a consequence engaged in mortal combat for more than a decade. The strategy will be to explore the social, political, economic, military, and diplomatic dimensions and ramifications from the perspective of each.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2219. Cold War Culture in America. 3 Credit Hours.

In the years following World War II, the United States held a position of unprecedented global power. Yet many Americans experienced a sense of insecurity about the world as never before. Anxieties about communism at home and abroad as well as the constant fear of a nuclear Armageddon shaped American daily life in the early postwar period. This seminar traces the correlation between America's foreign relations and its culture and society between 1945 and 1960. Participants will discuss the influence of the atomic bomb on American culture, the emergence of the national security state, the effect of anticommunism on individual liberties at home as well as containment policies abroad, cold war gender relations, and the international dimensions of the civil rights movement.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2280. Topics in American History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2301. Pre-Modern Europe. 3 Credit Hours.

The evolution of Europe from Roman times until 1750. The different cultures that went to make up Europe-Roman, Christian, "Barbarian," Muslim; formation of proto-states; technological and economic change; contact with non-Europeans; social and cultural movements over the medieval and early modern periods. Europe before the modern era was not a static, fossilized culture but rather a dynamic one marked by important discontinuities as well as continuities.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2303. History of Central Europe, 1618-1871. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the political, social, and cultural history of Central Europe from the Thirty Years War until the unification of Germany in 1871. Although Central European history is dominated by German history, this course will cover Central Europe broadly defined. In addition to German and Habsburg history, we will be looking at the important historical changes taking place in Poland, Hungary, and the other non-German regions of the Habsburg lands. In the course of the term we will concentrate on a number of overarching questions: the structure and political traditions of the early modern state (absolutism, rise of bureaucracies and modern state structures, development of political parties); the questions of backwardness, modernization, and relative economic and social development; the rise of nationalism and the emergence of unification politics; and the broad implications of profound changes in the way people in Central Europe thought about and lived their lives.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2304. 20th Century Europe: A Continent in Crisis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores Europe's tumultuous history during the past century. Over the course of the semester, we will study important moments, stories, groups and individuals from this period, and try to understand why Europeans fought two devastating wars within thirty years, wars that reshaped modern world history. We will explore Europe's gradual recovery from war and the paths it has taken toward unification and democratization. We will pay significant attention to the histories of Germany, France, and the United Kingdom and some attention to Eastern Europe and Russia/the Soviet Union. We will also look at Europe's global role, especially its imperial and colonial legacies, as well as the construction of the European Union.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2306. Rise of the European Dictators. 3 Credit Hours.

The rise to power of Hitler, Stalin, and Mussolini was conditioned by a prolonged crisis in Europe that began with the First World War and passed through economic depression, cultural upheaval, and the collapse of liberal democracy. This course examines this era of crisis (1918-1945) and explores the ways that these dictators harnessed Europe's troubles to create powerful mass movements. It examines their use of propaganda, nationalism, racism, and ideology. It also looks at the response of democratic nations to the challenges of Fascism, Nazism, and Communism. The course follows these dictators through to the catastrophe of World War II.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2307. Europe Divided and United, 1939-1995. 3 Credit Hours.

The creation of today's united, democratic and peaceful Europe has not been easy. It was achieved only after a half century of war, division, and ideological conflict. This course will treat the impact of the Second World War on Europe and its peoples, and then chart the division and occupation of the continent during the cold war. The course covers the major social, political, and economic trends in Europe since 1945, including the rise of the European Union, and shows how, in 1989, the continent was able to shake off the cold war and bring about peaceful revolution. The course also provides a survey of the major issues facing contemporary Europe, such as unemployment, racism, immigration, and the debate over Europe's role in world affairs.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2317. Central Europe Through Wars and Revolution, 1848-1989. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to new narratives of European nationalism and identity. The traditional courses on European history have relied on an understanding of European politics that divides the continent between east and west, and relies on Great Power perspectives. Using the concept of Central Europe, and the ways that it has been interpreted, this course encourages students to restore Central and Eastern Europe to the broader histories of the continent. Narratives of Eastern European peoples, Germans, Slavs, Hungarians, and others, were defined by the struggle between forces of nationalism and geopolitical realities, conflicting desires of sovereignty and security, freedom and social justice. This region, now part of the European Union, is rich in history and culture, as well as cultural and religious diversity. This course will highlight how East Europeans went from objects of high politics to subjects of European and world history.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2319. The Mafia in Modern Italy. 3 Credit Hours.

Organized crime emerged in modern Italy at the same time as the 19th century process of unification, and it remains a topic of heated debate and controversy in Italy today. In this course, we will trace the history of organized crime as a portal to underlying issues at the heart of the modern Italian nation: the relationship between state and society; tensions between national and regional identities; gender, work, and the family; party politics and the rise of fascism. Our study of the history of the mafia also necessitates a study of the history of anti-mafia movements in Italy. Who claims to represent the interests of the Italian nation and why? What is the image of organized crime in Italy today?

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2400. Special Topics. 4 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2411. Film in European History. 3 Credit Hours.

The renowned film historian Anton Kaes once wrote: "Historical films interpret national history for the broad public and thus produce, organize, and, to a large degree, homogenize public memory. Surpassing schools and universities, film, and television have become the most effective (and paradoxically least acknowledged) institutional vehicles for shaping historical consciousness." This course seeks to right that imbalance by acknowledging and studying the way that films (and other visual media) teach us about history. Using prominent American and European films (primarily), students will learn to critically analyze visual media, examining them for content, bias, and interpretation. The course will cover key episodes in modern European history and will provide historical background/context for the period necessary to evaluate and study films as historical documents.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2415. Russian History in Literature and Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will read and study a short history of Russia and then read literary works and watch films depicting various periods, topics, events, figures, and issues in Russian history.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2480. Topics in European History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2501. Introduction to East Asia: China. 3 Credit Hours.

Overview from ancient times to the present. Designed to provide students with a basic understanding of major themes and broad processes of social change in Chinese history. Emphasizes those aspects of continuity and change that are particularly relevant to contemporary China. Topics include: state formation; the development of characteristic institutions, thought, and cultural practices; long term trends in social dynamics and the economy; imperialism and semi colonialism; revolutionary transformation in the early 20th century; the Maoist road to socialism after 1949; and the post-socialist trajectory of the past two decades and its critique. Course materials include films, primary documents, and literature.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2502. Introduction to East Asia: Japan. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of Japanese history from early times to the 20th century. Major themes include religious, political, and social change. Major topics are: early state and religion; classical government, culture and society; emergence of the warrior class in medieval Japan; and the modern transformation into an urban, industrial empire. Course emphasizes broad historical themes of continuity and change and analysis of short primary documents in translation. Generally offered in alternate spring semesters.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2503. Introduction to Southeast Asia: Insular. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the histories of the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore from the 16th century until modern times. It will introduce students to the island worlds of Southeast Asia, its peoples, their histories, societies, and economies. To familiarize students with non-Western worlds, lectures will be illustrated with videotapes, slides, and transparencies. Excerpts of articles and indigenous documents will also be used for discussion. Course work will include readings, discussions, examinations, and book reviews.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2504. Introduction to Southeast Asia: Mainland. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the histories of Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, from the 16th century until modern times. It is a course designed to introduce students to the analysis of such forces as religion, statecraft, ideology, and trade, and the manner in which they have shaped the mainland countries of Southeast Asia. Mainland Southeast Asia's role in world politics and economy will also be analyzed. Reference will be made to contemporary events taking place in the region, and students will be encouraged to follow these developments through the media and integrate their knowledge in class discussions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2511. Introduction to African History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the study of African history. History is the record of human activities transmitted to posterity either in written or oral form. Africa has the longest record of human habitation, making African history the oldest in the family of human history. Given the immense complexity and richness of African history, we could only scan through the major themes of African history by studying the intertwining of African culture with African history proper. There are six books assigned for this course. They cover interdisciplinary issues pertaining to cultural studies, anthropological explorations, gender relations, and historical studies proper.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2512. Mexican Migration to the United States. 3 Credit Hours.

Illegal immigration remains a volatile and divisive question for the United States. Most discussions in the political system and in the mass media ignore the extensive history of Mexican migration to the United States. We will examine the pervasive influence of that history upon the present as well as the tight connections that exist between Mexican labor migration and phenomena that most US citizens prize-- the spread of American culture and influence abroad, international political stability, reliable domestic economic growth, and the availability of inexpensive goods and services. Instruction takes place through discussion, lecture, film, and computer projection. Readings include both primary documents stemming from historical events themselves as well as secondary academic studies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2513. Cold War Africa. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores African societies and politics during the Cold War. We pay close attention to the ways in which the politics of the Cold War were played out through proxy wars, interventionist policies, and the exploitation of natural resources in newly independent and emergent African nations. At the same time, we examine the ways in which African leaders and nations used the Cold War to define their own post-colonial experiences and identities. In addition, we investigate the significance of African nationalism and independence for redefining race and race relations in South Africa and the United States. Although we use examples from throughout the continent to explore issues of nationalism, sovereignty, race, socialism, and development within the Cold War context, we pay particular attention to Guinea-Bissau, Angola, Congo, South Africa, Ghana, and Ethiopia. Note: For history majors, this course is in the "Global/Comparative" category.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2514. Introduction to Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of Latin American history from pre-Hispanic civilizations through the Spanish and Portuguese colonial periods and nationhood to the present. Organized both chronologically and thematically, the course probes such issues as the rise and fall of political systems; matters of race, gender, and class; the economic conditions of work and survival; and patterns of social and cultural change. Methods of instruction include paperback readings, the Internet, and video clips.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2515. Civilization and Modernity in the Caribbean. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys post-Emancipation Caribbean history, regarding it as a complex process dominated by notions of "civilizing" and "modernizing." We will address the significance of both terms, exploring what they have meant for the diverse peoples inhabiting the region. What did civilizing mean for the labor practices and religious expressions of free blacks and indentured Indians in the late 19th century? What did modernizing mean for concepts of peoplehood, cultural production and representation in the 20th century? Who have been the primary agents of "civility" and "modernity"? And how have others responded to - resisted, embraced, negotiated - their efforts and ambitions? In answering these questions, we will turn to a range of disciplines including history, anthropology, literature and political science.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2516. Modern Islamic History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course studies Sunni Islam in terms of its modernist tendencies and its more traditional ones, comparing it to other major trends in the religion, Shi'ism and Sufism. Some emphasis is placed on Egyptian cultural history. The course encourages analytic skills through class participation and written work.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2517. Cuba: War, Hope, and Revolution. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines Cuba's history, culture and politics, from its remote past of the Taino people, to its major economic and political changes of the 20th century, to the end of the Cold War and renewed relations with the United States. Students explore Cuba's rich multicultural and multiethnic society and its leading artists, writers, and musicians, from writer and revolutionary Jose Marti, to visionary songstress Celia Cruz to Fidel Castro.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2518. The Ancient Near East. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of ancient Mesopotamian culture starting with the end of the neolithic period and covering Sumerian, Akkadian, Babylonian, Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian and Persian civilizations. Students will be introduced to the literature and the archaeology of these cultures and their influence on the Bible and later civilizations.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2519. Pre-Colonial Africa. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the events and processes that shaped African history prior to European colonial rule. Specifically, we explore the changing nature of African cultures; Islam as a political force; the relationship between Christianity, culture, and politics; slavery and the slave trades; and migration and the transformation of the African cultural landscape. Our goal is to understand the forces that shaped African material and political culture prior to European political domination and the relationship between African societies and the wider world to 1900. Note: For history majors, this course is in the "Global/Comparative" category.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2611. Third World Issues through Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Films bring alive the texture of society and the context of ideas, events, lives, and conflicts in a way that standard textbooks and readings cannot. This survey course introduces repeating, powerful, and important themes in modem history through the study of issues raised in Asian, African, and Latin American cinema. Unit I presents issues of Colonialism, Nationalism, and Independence Movements. Unit II, Post-Colonial Themes, includes nation building, neocolonialism, and responses to neocolonialism as well as issues of cultural reconstruction, political leadership, class, gender, race, and ethnicity in post-independence eras. Written texts complement the films; class discussion and assignments focus on analysis of the characters, events, institutions, and ideas represented in the films and readings.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2670. Topics in African History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2680. Topics in Asian History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2702. Imperialism, Race, and Empire. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces key themes and issues central to an understanding of race in modern history. Examining the intersection of race and imperialism-empire over the last two centuries, it places special importance on: how ideas about race were profoundly affected by the colonial encounter; how rationalizations for imperialism have often depended on race; and the resistance of subordinated people to racialist discourses and forms of rule. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2703. African Diaspora. 3 Credit Hours.

This course deals with the history of the African Diaspora in the Americas for the last five hundred years. How this African presence impacted upon the social, economic, cultural, religious, and demographic set-up of the Americas will be addressed. Themes like pan-African nationalism and racial discourse will also be discussed. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2705. Anti-Semitism/Holocaust/Racism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the history of antisemitism with a focus on the Holocaust and racism. It investigates the development and implementation of racial antisemitism in Germany and compares Nazi antisemitism with other forms of racism and antisemitism in Europe and America. The course also explores the social construction of race, the connection between antisemitism and anti-Zionism, the growth of neo-Nazism, the complex relationship between American Jews and African Americans, and racism in the world today. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2706. Jewish Diaspora. 3 Credit Hours.

Jewish history from the destruction of the Second Jewish Commonwealth to the creation of the State of Israel. Focus on minority status, migration, persecution, economic adaptation, gender roles in different environments, acculturation and identity. Will include the medieval Jewish experience under both Christian and Islamic rule; the development of Jewish communities in Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and the United States; the changing role of Jewish women; the rise of Zionism; and the Holocaust.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2803. Soldiers, Wars, and Societies: The British Army. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will trace the history of the British Royal Army from its founding in 1660-61 to the present. Emphasis will be placed on organization, recruitment, wars, battles, campaigns, prominent commanders, and how changes in the British Army mirrored changes in British society. Other important themes will be the army's role in conquering and defending the British Empire and major developments in British military policy and strategy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2804. Peace, Conflict, and Social Change. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the question of conflict/violence in terms of local, domestic, national, and international issues. Course material will consider conflict/violence using the following subtopics: weapons proliferation and peacekeeping; racism, the global economy; women, children, and the family; conflict and cooperation over the environment. Guest lecturers will offer their expertise on particular case studies related to the topic. In the final weeks of the semester, students will be asked to submit a paper and give presentations that address conflict and options for conflict resolution using selected case studies from one of the above topics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2805. Nationalism and Revolution. 3 Credit Hours.

Beginning with the establishment of civil and political rights during the French Revolution, the course will address the relationship of the individual to the nation-state in Western Europe from the French Revolution to World War I. The course will include problematical issues that emerged during this period such as: the Napoleonic wars and the emergence of the modern nation-state; the development of the industrial revolution and its socio-economic impact on members of the working and middle classes; the consolidation of the nation-state and its impact on personal and political freedom. But in addition to considering the expansion of liberal political developments in the West, the course will consider the effects of imperialism on Asian and African countries during the final decades of the century. The final unit will consider how nationalism and imperialism contributed to the outbreak of the First World War and to the breakdown of old political states and traditional values in the Western societies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2806. Colonial North Africa in European History. 3 Credit Hours.

The Mediterranean has always been a crossroads between peoples and religions, traversed by commodities, ideas, and conquerors, and it remains so today. Yet at the beginning of the 19th century, Europeans increasingly described North Africa - and its people - as starkly foreign, wholly 'other'. This course will examine European and North African interactions over the period of 1798 to the present, with a particular focus on European invasions and colonizations - including Napoleon in Egypt, Lyautey in Morocco, and Mussolini in Libya. How did Europeans shape North African history and how did colonizing North Africa form modern European institutions and ideas? The class will examine these questions by focusing on both sides of the Mediterranean 'divide', including recent debates in Europe on North African immigrants, political invocations of Islam, and Islamophobia.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2811. World War I. 3 Credit Hours.

The First World War (1914-1918) did more to shape the history of the 20th century than any other military conflict. It led to the destruction of empires, the outbreak of revolutions, and gave rise to Communism, Fascism and Nazism. The war catapulted the United States into a position of global dominance that it still maintains today. The war also transformed modern arts and culture. This course surveys not just the military history of the conflict, but its political, social, and cultural impact on Europe, the Middle East, the United States, Africa, and Asia. Extensive use is made in this course of primary sources, including soldiers' diaries, memoirs, poetry, novels, propaganda, and photographs. Research projects will draw upon extensive online collections.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2812. World War II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a survey of World War II, the largest and most destructive armed conflict in human history, with coverage of its causes and consequences. It utilizes the prism of grand strategy to analyze national policy and military strategy. In addition to detailed descriptions of major military operations, the course will assess the impact that Adolph Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Winston S. Churchill, Joseph Stalin, and Franklin D. Roosevelt had on the war. While this course emphasizes military events and wartime diplomacy, some attention will be paid to the internal politics of the major belligerents and economic factors. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2815. Love, Marriage, and Family. 3 Credit Hours.

It is easy to assume that love, marriage, and family go together; but this has not always been the case. These concepts have a history. This course is a comparative examination of love, marriage, and family and the related themes of gender and sexuality in different historical periods and geographical areas. It includes ancient, medieval, and modern texts and materials and covers both western (European and American) and non-western (Asia, Africa, and perhaps Middle Eastern and Latin American) case studies. NOTE: Each instructor may place a different emphasis among those topics and regions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2816. Gender, Class, Nation. 3 Credit Hours.

An exploration of social and economic roles of women and men in modern Europe. Comparison of the impact of gender, class, and nationality on middle-class, working-class and peasant women and men in England, France, Germany, Italy, and Russia. The effects of industrialization, nationalism, war, fascism, communism, and the welfare state on women's and men's lives. The evolution of the role of girls and women in the family and the changing status of single and married women in the home and the workplace.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2817. Gender, War, and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

In wartime, the traditional organization of society is often radically altered to meet the pragmatic and ideological needs of triumphing in the ongoing conflict. Ideas about gender - i.e., how masculinity and femininity are defined - are frequently subject to radical revision in the context of a society at war. This course examines the European and, to a lesser extent, the American experiences of war during the two World Wars and the intervening 20 year period, to understand how war and ideas of gender are related. Using both primary and secondary source materials, as well as films about World Wars I and II, the course looks at the experiences of men and women on the front lines and on the home front, those who participated in the wars and those who resisted them, those who benefited from war and those who were its victims. The course examines not only how wartime experiences construct and revise ideas about gender, but also how the rhetoric of gender is often used to further wartime aims.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2818. American Icons. 3 Credit Hours.

The Statue of Liberty. Lincoln. Barbie. Route 66. Disneyland. Elvis. Ali. These are all American Icons. This course will explore iconic images of America as a way to understand the central myths, promises, and ideas behind the nation – ideas about freedom, individuality, democracy, mobility, second chances, masculinity and femininity, race and class. Each unit will focus on an individual icon, its origins, what it represented, and how this representation has changed over time and place. The course will invite a critical analysis of these icons and their economic and cultural impact in a global context.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2819. Global Connections. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to major themes in global history over the past two centuries. It will chart the trajectory of transnational human relations from the overlapping cosmopolitan webs of the early nineteenth century to the global webs of the early twenty-first century. The course will place equal weight on economic, political, and cultural transformations. Students will explore the economic, political, social, and cultural changes that attended the growth and increasing integration of these webs. They will study the constant tension between conflict and cooperation that simultaneously brought them closer together and pulled them farther apart. The course will help students understand the origins of the current world system by exploring global transformations since the American and French revolutions. Themes include the rise of nationalism; the revolutions of 1848; American expansion; industrialization; the opening of Japan; colonialism; imperialism; world migrations; the decline of the British and the rise of the American empire in the first half of the 20th century; the two World Wars; the cold war; decolonization movements in the 1950s; cultural and economic globalization; and the transportation and communication revolutions of the last third of the 20th century.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2870. Topics in Women's History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2882. Independent Study. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2900. Honors Special Topics I. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2910. Honors Special Topics II. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2915. Honors Russian History in Literature and Film. 3 Credit Hours.

In this honors course, students read and study a short history of Russia and then read literary works and watch films depicting various periods, topics, events, figures, and issues in Russian history. Students in the course develop an understanding of the depiction of history in literature and film as contingent on the ideological perspective of the storyteller; students also learn to identify ideological perspective through attention to symbol, metaphor, and theme in both literature and film and, in addition, in film, through attention to lighting, sound and other filmic devices.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2918. Honors American Icons. 3 Credit Hours.

The Statue of Liberty. Lincoln. Barbie. Route 66. Disneyland. Elvis. Ali. These are all American Icons. This course will explore iconic images of America as a way to understand the central myths, promises, and ideas behind the nation – ideas about freedom, individuality, democracy, mobility, second chances, masculinity and femininity, race and class. Each unit will focus on an individual icon, its origins, what it represented, and how this representation has changed over time and place. The course will invite a critical analysis of these icons and their economic and cultural impact in a global context.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2920. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2930. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2940. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 2970. Honors Topics in Latin American History. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an upper division honors course. It focuses on a special topic that changes each term. For more information, please see the history department web site at www.temple.edu/history.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3101. Colonial America. 3 Credit Hours.

Many important aspects of U.S. society developed significantly before the Revolution. The purpose of this course is to understand better how this society took shape in that formative early era. The first classes deal with some general issues that colonizers faced as they tried to form and develop settlements in North America, and the way the English entered into this process. Then characteristics of how three regions of the colonies evolved are examined: the South, New England, and the Middle Atlantic. The final few weeks of the course take up changes in political life, economics, and culture that all parts of the colonies experienced in the 1700s and which tended to bring them together towards becoming one new nation, though not a nation without differences and conflicts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3102. American Revolution and Republic, 1754-1789. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the transformations in politics, culture and society that we call the American Revolution. What was revolutionary and not revolutionary about the period? What did the Revolution mean to the people who lived through it, and how might the answer be different for different groups of people? What was the relationship between the famous, enduring ideals of the Revolution and the realities of life in late 18th century America? And what kind of republic came out of the process? We will also consider the revolution as, among other things, a crisis in the first British empire, the creation of independent states and a nation, a civil war, and a massive slave rebellion, the aftershocks of which reverberated in the 19th century.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3103. The Early United States, 1787-1846. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the political, social, and cultural history of the U.S. from ratification of the Constitution to the beginnings of the crisis over expansion and slavery. It examines the democratization of politics and the problems of national independence; territorial expansion; economic change; the development of regional, class, religious, racial, ethnic and gendered subcultures; slavery and resistance to slavery; and the new political and reform movements that responded to the era's deep and lasting changes.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3104. 19th Century America. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an advanced level history course aimed at giving history majors and students in other disciplines such as English and Political Science an understanding of the changes in American life during the 19th century. This is truly a "World We Have Lost," a society dominated by agriculture, but becoming increasingly industrial and urbanized. But even though a visit to the world of 100 years ago is as foreign to contemporary students as the visit by the anthropologist to a non-western culture, the consequence for modern American life is immense. The topics discussed in this course are related to the changes in the United States that promoted its development as a multicultural democracy and an economic superpower.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3105. 20th Century America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course analyzes American politics, society and culture in the 20th century. Among the topics to be analyzed are the changing role of the presidency from McKinley to Clinton, progressivism, World War I, the conflictive 1920s, the depression and the New Deal, World War II, affluence in the 1950s, the Cold War, antiCommunism, racism, the civil rights movement, the rebellious 1960s, the war in Vietnam, Nixon, the Great Society, the women's movement and gender issues, the conservative backlash, and the new diversity.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3107. American Cultural History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will not attempt to cover all aspects of American cultural history in one semester. Instead, it will examine some important themes from the 19th and 20th centuries. It will use material drawn from elite and popular sources to explore the meaning of "culture" in a diverse, democratic society. It will ask when and why Americans began to think that there was such a thing as American culture. It will interrogate this culture for some basic elements, taking into account the role of such important features of American life as liberalism, pragmatism, patriotism, consumerism, and modernism as well as the impact of science, technology, the arts, and religion. It will distinguish between public culture, intended for the edification of all, and the private cultures of different subgroups.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3108. Modern American Social History. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the main elements of American social/economic development during the industrial period, approximately 1870-1945, with some attention to the transition to the post-industrial era after World War II. Topics covered include the growth of new industries and changing work conditions, urbanization, class divisions, immigration and black migration, the changing status of women and the family, and the impact of the Great Depression and the New Deal on American life. Both secondary and primary sources, including two important novels with social history themes, are used in the course, and students are required to write an essay (and give an in-class report) that analyzes a specific primary source dealing with one of the aspects of social history covered in the lectures and required readings. The take-home final exam essay also requires that students evaluate sources. Class participation in discussing the readings is also an important part of the course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3151. Local History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to doing local and regional historical research, especially in collaborative partnership with community organizations such as museums and historical societies. We will learn how to design community research projects and how to harness resources that are particularly relevant to them, such as: census records, fire insurance maps, municipal archives, online databases, public records, images, artifacts, and recorded interviews. Along the way, we will consider the perils and possibilities of doing local history and the extent to which successful collaboration can pivot on competing notions of the past. This course is organized around an actual collaborative partnership with a Philadelphia-area cultural organization wherein you will provide the historical expertise.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3152. Material Culture for Historians. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the major themes, issues, and methods relevant to the study of material culture and the past. Although archaeologists have long concerned themselves with the study of prehistoric objects, only within recent decades have scholars focused their attention on the evidentiary value of historic objects. We will consider the variety of ways in which scholars from diverse fields have sought to infer historical meaning from things and then seek specifically to understand how historians have applied those ideas to their own work. Because this course is also concerned with the role objects play in exhibits and collections, it is particularly well suited to students considering careers in public history.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3201. California Dreams, California Nightmares. 3 Credit Hours.

Over the century and a half since California was forcibly incorporated into the United States, it has exercised a powerful role upon the imagination and reality of every generation. California has been, at once, the golden gate of opportunity and the grapes of wrath of the downtrodden; social mobility and the policy of incarceration, the glamour of Hollywood and monotony of tract housing, the high-tech of Silicon Valley and the high-sweat of agricultural labor, the Eden of natural bounty and the ecological disaster of sprawl and smog. This course concentrates on the historical role that categories of race have played in defining by whose means, to whose benefit, and in whose image California's wealth would be produced and consumed. As an intermediate-level history course, this course offers a mix of primary and secondary sources, emphasizes the interaction of multiple causal factors, and encourages students to interpret and to write analytical historical arguments. In addition to discussion, lecture, and common readings, methods of instruction in the course include use of a computer-assisted classroom to provide image and text projections, video clips, and internet linkages. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3211. Development of the Modern American City. 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines the way that the American city has undergone two revolutionary changes in the 135 years since the Civil War. In the mid- to late 19th century the city went from a walking city to a streetcar city, altering the basic social and economic geography. Then in the 20th century American cities were transformed from streetcar cities to automobile cities, again revolutionizing the cities' basic geography. The two transformations were rooted in technological innovation in such areas as transportation, power, and building construction. But the changes also depended upon what American urban dwellers chose to make of the technologies. History, by examining the way that American cities have changed in the past, can illuminate what the American city has become and thus can provide insight into the factors that should be taken into account in influencing the future of cities.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3214. North American Environmental History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the interactions between human societies and the natural world in North America. That relationship is complex: the environment both reflects people's influences and affects human history. Through lectures, reading, and discussion, participants in this course will examine this reciprocal relationship. Issues to be discussed in the course include Native American management of the environment; the effects of the European ecological invasion; resource exploitation in the industrial era; the foundations of the preservationist and conservationist movements at the beginning of the 20th century; the evolution of 20th century environmentalism; and the historical context of current environmental problems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3215. Historical Roots of Urban Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

The course focuses on two aspects of the history of the underworld of American cities: The first aspect might be called the life within the underworld, or what it means to live the life of a criminal. The course examines how bookmakers or madams run their businesses, how pickpocket gangs pick pockets, how loan sharks collect their money, and what kind of culture and social life characterizes those who are part of the underworld life. The second aspect is the way that underworld activities both reflect and influence the wider society. The course, then, examines the interrelationships of crime, on the one hand, and ethnic groups, neighborhood structure, urban politics, criminal justice institutions, the rise of professional sports, the changing sexual mores of the society, and even such aspects as the changing role of the family and the impact of technology. Crime becomes a prism through which students will learn about the history of American urban society.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3216. Media and American Culture, 1706-Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the role of media in the development of American popular culture, with particular emphasis on the cultural transformations brought about by mass media after 1880. Historical analysis will demonstrate the profound shift in media roles within the past century; from media expressions of popular culture before 1889, to media as generators of popular culture after that point. A by-product of this analysis will be the formulation of a critical definition of mass media in terms of a specific relationship between the media and the audience.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3217. African American Church and Black Liberation. 3 Credit Hours.

Race has been and is a central issue in America. Race has played a very important role in the lives of black people and in the history of African Americans. Historically the black church has been a central institution for addressing pressing societal issues that threaten the existence of black people. African Methodism, the first major black Christian organization came into existence as a liberation movement and a protest against racism and segregation in the Christian Church. Utilizing selected historic periods, i.e., ante-bellum, Civil War and Reconstruction, the 1920s and 1930s, and the 1960s, this course will explore the meaning of freedom and liberation as defined by the historic African American church and its leadership, and will examine the different ideologies and strategies employed by church leaders in addressing and resolving issues regarding the individual and collective freedom of black people. American and African American history will be used as the context, for examining issues, events, movements and personalities important to understanding the role and impact of the black church on the development of liberationist black thought and movements during different periods.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3221. Jewish Experience in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers the evolution of the Jewish community in the United States from its colonial beginnings to the present day. Topics include the immigrant experiences of various waves of migration, especially from Eastern Europe; the development of the major religious movements within Judaism; the role of Jews in American culture, economy, and politics; relationship between American Jews and Israel; assimilation and identity.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3225. Women in U.S. History. 3 Credit Hours.

The principal theme of this course in women's history can be summed up in this phrase: "Unity, Difference, and Diversity: The Search for Sisterhood and Beyond." Working with a textbook, a number of scholarly articles, and documents that come from throughout American history, we will explore the ways in which women have both been affected by, and helped to shape, this nation's history. Our emphasis will be on how women of different socioeconomic backgrounds, races, and ethnic groups have experienced colonization, American expansion, sectionalism, the industrial revolution, urbanization, immigration, war, economic depression, cultural transformations and political change. We will be looking not only at commonalities but also differences among women as well as the conflicts between women and a society based on male supremacy. We will be exploring how race, ethnicity, and class affect the experience of gender.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3228. America's Rise to Globalism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will trace the contours of U.S. foreign policy from its colonial origins through the destruction of the myth of isolationism produced by the attack on Pearl Harbor. Although the syllabus proceeds chronologically, the lectures and readings emphasize thematic continuities and discontinuities. These themes include the ideological, strategic, economic, cultural, and racial influences on America's foreign relations; mission, manifest destiny, and continental expansion; issues of war, peace, and security; crisis management and mismanagement; the closing frontier and imperialism; Wilsonianism and its critics; independent internationalism; and personal versus coalition diplomacy. Because the study of diplomatic history is highly interpretative, and the assigned studies reflect competing interpretations, all students will be expected to question, comment upon, and yes, even criticize the readings and lectures. In doing so, emphasis will be placed on recognizing and assessing the strategies historians employ to collect and use evidence in order to advance arguments. Students will be required to "volunteer" at the start of each session to summarize briefly and cogently the primary issues and arguments covered in the preceding one, and students should be prepared to respond to questions and references to the readings that will be incorporated into each session's lectures.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3229. Superpower America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys the history of U.S. foreign relations from World War II to the present. It focuses on the ways that political, economic and cultural forces, both at home and abroad, helped shape America's relationship with the wider world. The course deals with issues such as the American response to the challenge of war; the impact of anti-Communism on American society and foreign policy; the role of economic interests in shaping U.S. foreign policy; and the creation of the national security state during the Cold War. This course shows the many ways that the United States has deployed its power during what is often called the American Century.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3280. Topics in American History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3296. Intermediate Writing Seminar in American History. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics for this seminar will vary, and complete descriptions of current offerings can be found on the History Department web site (www.temple.edu/history). All seminars are writing-intensive; frequent writing assignments will help students develop or practice specific writing skills and the research skills that will be critical for success in the senior-level capstone seminar.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3311. Greek History. 3 Credit Hours.

The Greek History survey begins with the Bronze Age and ends shortly after the Peloponnesian Wars. Students will read a narrative history, a study of the art in historical context, and a selection of the ancient literary sources upon which our knowledge is based. Strong emphasis is placed on the archaeological material and how it is used to augment the literary sources. The philosophical and cultural achievements of ancient Greece will be put in historical context.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3312. Roman History. 3 Credit Hours.

This survey of Roman History begins with the foundation of Rome in the 8th century B.C. and ends with the founding of the Christian capital of the Empire at Constantinople. Students will read a narrative history, a study of various aspects of Roman society and culture, and a selection of the ancient sources upon which our knowledge is based. Archaeological material will be used to augment the literary sources. The influence of Rome on later Western Civilization in government and law will be studied as well as its role in determining the foundation of Christianity.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3315. Becoming England: Narrating the Medieval Nation. 3 Credit Hours.

How are nations invented and notions of national identity imagined? This course will explore the cultural, political and technological strategies whereby an identity called Englishness and a nation called England came to be forged on an island amidst a mosaic of ethnic communities speaking different languages and subject to waves of conquest. We will study how this notion of Englishness became a powerful force in attempts to colonize the British Isles (Ireland, Wales, Scotland) and beyond.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3321. Irish History. 3 Credit Hours.

Irish and Irish American culture, society, religion, and problems associated with minority status and oppression. Special questions relating to the changing structure of family ties and women and related issues; Irish American consciousness as exemplified by support over the recent troubles in Northern Ireland. The recent and dramatic improvements in the standard of living in the Republic and the growing disparity amongst the urban Irish will serve to complete this study.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3331. History of England. 3 Credit Hours.

How the kingdom of England was created and how its government evolved from a feudal monarchy to a constitutional democracy that has been a model for other countries, especially the United States. How England became the first industrial nation and how its society and culture responded to this change.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3332. Historic Britain, 1688-1815. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines British history from the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688 through the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815. Using a variety of primary and secondary sources, including novels, the course will examine the debates and arguments that contributed to the establishment of the modern industrialized nation-state in Britain. The course examines such important events as the industrial revolution and its implications for Britain and the world, the development of a constitutional parliamentary form of government which was important for the nascent United States, as well as for Britain, the development of mass politics and radical politics, and Britain's involvement in European and world affairs.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3333. Modern Britain: Empire, War, Rock and Roll. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the history of Britain from the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 until the present. Using a variety of historical sources, including primary and secondary historical sources, as well as novels and journalistic reportage, the course looks at the critical questions that have faced Britain and have influenced world history over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. Among the issues to be examined are the development of mass politics, and the inclusion of the working classes and women in the British polity, the development and Thatcherite decline of the welfare state, the construction and demise of the British Empire, Britain's military and diplomatic roles in the two world wars, and position in the emerging European Union. The course examines these questions from a variety of different angles, including political, cultural, economic and social.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3341. French Revolution and Napoleon. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will treat the history of the French Revolution from the mid 18th century through the Napoleonic era (1750-1821). Material in the course will address varied interpretations of the revolution from classical Marxist to more recent cultural, feminist, and post-modern perspectives on the subject. In addition to various texts on the revolution, the course also includes a detailed discussion of Napoleon Bonaparte's military and political career with due consideration given to the French empire and its impact on the subsequent political configuration of 19th century Europe.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3342. Revolutionary Europe. 3 Credit Hours.

This course treats major social, political, and cultural revolutions that occurred in Europe during the modern period (1789-1989). By addressing specific revolutions, the class will attempt to discern some patterns in the causes and occurrence of revolutionary events. More precisely, the course will consider historical factors related to the outbreak of revolutions due to rural economics, industrial transformation, class conflict, commercial changes, and ideological influence prior to or during revolutionary periods. Specific topics include: the French Revolution; the Industrial Revolution and Revolutions of 1848; the French Commune; the Russian Revolution, and the social and cultural revolutions of the 30's.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3343. Getting Crusaded: Making Europe/Making Orientalism. 3 Credit Hours.

Some historians contend that the history of medieval Crusading movements is an overdone cliche of 19th century European historiography; other historians argue that such movements were violently constitutive of the formation of Europe. We will explore these contrasting claims by focusing on the following questions: How can we talk critically about historiographical cliche? How did Christians come to fabricate an imaginary territorial space called the 'Holy Land' and then imagine that it required Christian military defense? How did medieval Christians paradoxically link the notion of a perpetual peace of God to perpetual holy war? How did the Pope in Rome become an imperial monarch capable of controlling holy wars? How did medieval Christians create an imaginary world of Saracens (their word for Muslims) to which they attached sexualized fantasies of pollution and aggression? How did Western Christendom come to bundle together Eastern Christians, Jews, heretics, and pagans with 'Saracens' as enemies of Christendom that must be destroyed?

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3344. Love, Money, War: Medieval Style. 3 Credit Hours.

Counting money, accounting for debt, managing the budget - could such simple everyday practices actually be forces for transformation that change the way we think about embodiment, space, time, love, violence, power? This course will explore the world of the English royal treasury in the 12th century. At that time royal accountants invented new financing techniques. We will explore these fiscal inventions and then trace their ripples throughout society from the ways English kings made love, waged war, legislated law, and exercised rights over bodies, especially the Jews residing in England at this time. We will study how technologies can work not only as tools, but also as weapons. Thus, the question of violence and technology is central to our study.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3351. Rome and Italy: Renaissance to the Present. 3 Credit Hours.

A broad survey of Italian history from medieval to modern times. Although the unified Italian state is a modern creation little more than a century old, Italy gave birth to Europe's first urban civilization in its glorious renaissance cities. Italy finally achieved unity and played a major role in European affairs, which unfortunately included two world wars and the fascist dictatorship of Benito Mussolini. More than is the case with most countries Italian history is the history of its great cities like Rome, Florence, Venice, and Milan. We will focus on those centers, especially Rome, which is also the home of the Popes whose role in Italian and world history is immense, and Florence, the home of great artists and such great modern figures as Dante, Machiavelli, and Galileo.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3352. Roman Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, students will discuss and examine the physical remains of Roman culture, and explore the ways these artifacts affect the study of history. After looking at the Greek and Etruscan contributions to Rome life and a brief look at the limited remains from Republican Rome, the material from the Roman Empire will be surveyed. Special attention will be paid to architecture, city planning and sculpture. Detailed examination of the ruins from the cities of Rome, Pompeii, Herculaneum and Ostia will comprise the bulk of the course. Students will be expected to do some work at area museums.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3361. Early Russian Empire, 1547-1905. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine many of the dramatic political and social events of the construction of Russian empire from the 16th century to the Revolt of 1905. Major attention will be paid to peasant issues, the role of the intelligentsia, and international competition.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3362. Russia: Nationality and Empire. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines factors and events that shaped Russia's history between 1700 and 1917. Special focus is on the role of "enlightened" autocracy, the rise of bureaucratic state, and spread of Western values, but also on various forms and ways of popular resistance, from peasant's rebellions to Populists and revolutionaries. Another emphasis is on placing Russian history in a broader context of modern European history, Enlightenment, liberalism, and progressivism. Lectures and reading projects are complimented by wide use of multimedia and Internet resources, films and music.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3363. Russia: Revolution, State, and Empire. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, from the Russian Revolution of 1917 until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. It deals with major factors and events, including Communism, two world wars, and the Cold War, that shaped Soviet history. The course explores Soviet impact on European and world developments, and Soviet motives in confrontation with the United States. Reading and lectures are complimented with multi-media and Internet sources, discussions and individual presentations.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3411. Belief and Society in Pre-Modern Europe. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of changes in belief systems (both religious and ideological) and their impact on, and influence by, the society around them. The course will focus especially on beliefs as understood and interpreted by the wider society, not just a few intellectuals. Focus is on diversity of belief and practice within an overwhelmingly, but not monolithically, Christian society.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3412. Power and Conflict in Pre-Modern Europe. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the kinds of power struggles that took place in Europe during the medieval and early modern period, and the military, legal, and other means used to resolve them. Struggles among monarchs and territorial magnates; the Crusades; heresy and its suppression; religious wars; and much more local and personal disputes as well.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3413. Getting Medieval: Gender, Sex, and Power. 3 Credit Hours.

Does Europe have a sex? Can everyday gender normativity be politically constitutive and also the occasion of excessive violence? To answer these questions we will study what bodies mattered in pre-modern Christian Europe and think about the fate of bodies that did not matter. This course explores different strategies of constructing masculinities and femininities in pre-modern Christian Europe and asks who/what had the power to universalize and discipline such fabrications. We will study how the papacy and medieval monarchies regulated gender and sexuality among Christians and also between Christians, Jews, Muslims and so-called "pagans" from c 500 CE to 1500 CE and in so doing creating a powerful political notion of a territorial "inside" called Europe.

Class Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following: Freshman 0 to 29 Credits

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3414. Antigone and the Limits of Sovereignty. 3 Credit Hours.

The corpse of a young warrior lies stinking in the sun, prey to birds and animals. The head of state has proclaimed a death sentence on whomever would dare to attempt its burial. To whom does the corpse belong? How does one speak out against sovereign force? The rotting corpse goes to the heart of sovereign power and its limits. How does the shameful rotting corpse tell a story about politics, technology, and the construction of the human and the inhumane? Sophocles' Greek tragedy, performed in 442 BCE, posed this question at the height of imperial power in Athens. At other times of political crisis great poets and dramatists have used the play, "Antigone," to remind us again of the limits of sovereign power. We will read Sophocles' "Antigone" and study how translations and rewriting of the play have occurred during periods of political emergency in Periclean Athens, during the "terror" of French Revolution, in the aftermath of Holocaust, in the shadow of South African apartheid. How have dramatists such as Sophocles, Francis Hoelderlin, Bertolt Brecht, Athol Fugard used "Antigone" to reflect on sovereignty? We will read and compare these different renderings of "Antigone" alongside the recent work of the philosophers Alain Badiou and Giorgio Agamben who have urgently questioned once again the relation of the state to "nature" and have asked us once again to pause and consider the relation of evil to "business as usual."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3422. Art, Culture, and European Societies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the shift from elitist forms of representation in the arts to the increased popularization (and democratization) of European politics and culture from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Using both contextual (historical) and formal (art historical) tools for analysis, the class will trace stylistic changes in art, literature, music and the press. More specifically, this includes a consideration of political propaganda and neoclassicism during the revolutionary epoch to romanticism, realism, impressionism, and expressionism concurrent with the establishment and commercial expansion of the modern nation state. Additionally, the course will consider the "democratization" (or popularization) of visual and material culture through the lithographic press, the daily newspaper, photography, and poster publicity. The concluding unit will incorporate visual propaganda in particular European countries during the perilous decades that preceded and followed World War I.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3425. Europe and the Other. 3 Credit Hours.

Modern society is not the first to deal with issues of racial, ethnic, religious, gender, or sexual difference. This course explores European interactions during the late antique, medieval, and early modern periods with those they saw as different: either outside their society (from the early Roman encounters with the barbarians to the European explorations in Africa and the "New World") or within (Jews, Muslims, women, the poor, dissidents, and deviants).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3431. Women's Lives in Modern Europe. 3 Credit Hours.

This course treats issues related to women's status and power in Modern European History from the 18th century to the present. The emphasis of the course will be on the experiences of women in England, France, Germany, and Russia where significant economic and political changes have occurred in the past few centuries. The purpose of this course is to discuss important issues that women have confronted in the past, and that continue to influence problems that women face today such as: personal, economic, and political power, education, sexuality, psychology, and social esteem, women's position in the home and workplace plus the continuing question of conventional versus unconventional gender roles in Western Societies. To supplement a general text and several published sources in European history, students will be reading memoirs and essays written by women on economic, political, and social issues pertaining to women, work, and the family during the past two centuries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3433. Blood and Iron: 19th Century European Diplomacy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will be a survey of the history of European diplomacy from the wars of the French Revolution until the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Modern warfare, nationalism, and tremendous economic, social, and technological upheaval shaped the 19th century and fundamentally altered the way nation-states interacted. Therefore, we cannot be content in this course to study the biographies of Metternich, Napoleon III, Bismarck, and other great diplomats of the 19th century, though they will receive due attention. In order to explain the events that in many ways laid the groundwork for the world situation in our own time, we will examine cultural and intellectual movements, military and scientific innovations, and political and social changes that still affect the way nations conduct diplomacy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3434. Cold War from the Other Side: The Communist Countries and International History, 1945-1991. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will explore the history of the Cold War from the perspective of the main U.S. adversaries in the Cold War: the Soviet Union and China. Also, the course provides secondary themes, covering the motives and actions of other communist countries, including Eastern European countries, Vietnam and Cuba.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3435. Military Strategy and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This class develops students' comparative analytical skills in the identification and comprehension of historical arguments at the same time that it examines the multiple causal factors that have shaped warfare over the last two thousand years.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3438. Post-Colonial Europe: Decolonization and After. 3 Credit Hours.

At the end of World War II, European states still controlled vast overseas empires, which very soon afterwards disappeared. This course examines how the decolonization of these empires shaped political, cultural and intellectual events and developments in Europe's recent past. We will focus on Great Britain and France, the two most important imperial states, but also look at other countries that lost their empires in these years, such as the Netherlands and Portugal. We will think about why empire was so important to these countries as well as why their political leaders and historians sought to erase this importance. Our topics will range from efforts to redefine foreign relations after empire to "post-colonial" immigration and the emergence of "multicultural" European nation-states. We will look at the cultural effects of immigration and how European political activists drew inspiration from anti-colonial movements.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3480. Topics in European History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3496. Intermediate Writing Seminar in European History. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics for this seminar will vary, and complete descriptions of current offerings can be found on the History Department web site (www.temple.edu/history). All seminars are writing-intensive; frequent writing assignments will help students develop or practice specific writing skills and the research skills that will be critical for success in the senior-level capstone seminar.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3511. Southern Africa: A History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course deals with the history of Southern Africa focusing on South Africa. It also includes the history of Angola, Mozambique, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. A good part of the course deals with a detailed study of the history of apartheid in South Africa from its inception to its political demise in 1994. It also deals with the history of African resistance against the Dutch-British racial order. Some of the themes of the course include: African societies in Southern Africa; European slave traders, settlers, and colonizers (Portuguese, Dutch, British, and German); racism and apartheid in South Africa and Southern Africa at large; African nationalism and the struggle against white domination; the demise of Portuguese colonialism in Angola and Mozambique; the political demise of apartheid and post-apartheid Southern Africa.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3521. The Chinese Revolution. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a general introduction to the Chinese Revolution (1921-49) from the perspective of sociopolitical history. Special emphasis on: the internal historical trends and external (semi-colonialist) interventions that shaped the struggle for revolutionary change in the 20th century; conditions in the countryside on the eve of revolution; the urban and rural contours of the Communist Movement; the evolution of Mao Zedong's thought; and revolutionary process and dynamics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3522. Contemporary China. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines society, the state, and popular politics in the Peoples' Republic of China from 1949 to the present. Special emphasis on: revolutionary transformation and socialist construction during the Maoist years (1949-79); the postsocialist trajectory and its critique over the last two decades.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3531. Modern India. 3 Credit Hours.

Beginning with some of the basic social structures of village India, we move on to study changes introduced by the British during 200 years of colonial rule. An analysis of anti-imperial nationalism, headed by Gandhi, leads in turn to the study of India since independence in 1947, with special attention to international relations, non-governmental organizations, the politics of religious militance, and the causes and consequences of India's opening to the global economy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3541. Japan Today. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines important social, political, and economic trends in Japan from 1945 to the 1990s through lecture, discussion, audio-visual materials, and group oral reports. Topics include the Occupation, the "economic miracle," state and society, the world of work, women, and gender, international relations, impact of affluence, post-bubble Japan, and varying approaches to the study of postwar Japanese history and society.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3542. Women and Society in Japan. 3 Credit Hours.

This course analyzes the changing position of women in Japanese society from ancient times to the present. Through discussions, lectures, and audiovisual materials, students learn about goddesses, female diviners, empresses, the classical female writers, women in warrior culture, women in industrializing Japan, and Japanese women's movements.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3551. History of Vietnam. 3 Credit Hours.

Emphasizing cultural, social, and economic factors, the course traces Vietnamese history from its mythological origins to the 21st century. Topics include indigenous social formations, the period of Chinese domination, the rise of independent Vietnamese dynasties, the French colonial era, the Vietnamese Revolution, and the three Indochina Wars, including the Vietnam Conflict in the 20th century. It will close with consideration of life under the current Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3556. Vietnam, 1945-1992: Resistance, War and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

First known as the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, today's Socialist Republic of Vietnam was created in the wave of nationalism which swept through Southeast Asia at the end of the War in the Pacific in 1945. This course examines the internal and external forces which shaped the new state, paying close attention to the role of the communist party. We will use books based on recent archival research, mainly in Vietnam and France, to attempt to move beyond the ideological history and prejudices of the Cold War. Vietnam provides a fascinating case study of a country which was both strongly influenced by the Cold War, but which at the same time itself had a strong influence on the course of international history.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3561. History of Brazil. 3 Credit Hours.

Brazil is one of the world's largest nations being inferior in territorial size only to the United States, Russia, and China. With more than 150,000,000 people, Brazil is second in population among western hemisphere nations to the United States, and far larger than any Latin American nation. Brazilians can claim national unity solidly based on a common language and common cultural heritage. Brazilians are descended from Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, but can claim a recent history relatively free of ethnic or racial strife. Brazil is rich in natural resources, and has one of the world's few natural resource frontiers. Finally, Brazil continues to produce outstanding architects, artists, writers, composers, social scientists and legal intellectuals, religious and political leaders, entrepreneurs and athletes. At the same time, persistent problems block Brazilian development. They include widespread racism and class bias, excessive dependence on foreign capital and technology, a shamefully inadequate public school system, a perverse distribution of income that favors the wealthy, and fragile democratic institutions. After 500 years of history, Brazilians have immense tasks before them, while the promise of national greatness remains unfulfilled.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3562. Contemporary Mexico. 3 Credit Hours.

Over the past several years, Mexico has become increasingly integrated with the United States economically, socially, and culturally; a phenomenon that has presented new challenges to both countries to organize this irreversible process constructively. We will look at the present-day questions between the United States and Mexico through the experience of Mexico's history since 1940. This period includes decades of industrialization, city growth, labor migration to the United States, cultural flourishing, political restlessness, the emergence of narcotics trafficking, and incorporation into the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This course concludes with some speculative considerations about the future. Instruction takes place through discussion, lecture, film, computer projection, and readings from the new historical scholarship that has emerged on post-1940 Mexico.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3563. Puerto Rican History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores particular issues related to the political, economic, and social development of Puerto Rico with special emphasis given to the 19th and 20th centuries. The course will not only address historical paragons but also questions of interpretations. In each class a combination of readings, discussion, lectures, and videos will be used to view the various issues in a comprehensive manner.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3564. Caliban's World: Cultural Politics in the 20th Century Americas. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers the history of struggles for decolonization primarily but not exclusively in the Americas during the 20th century. It focuses particularly on the uses of "culture" and the significance of creative expression in movements dedicated to dismantling the hegemony of the "West." From writers wrestling with Shakespeare's Tempest to musicians arranging artful ways to "curse," we examine texts, music and films in which people work to imagine a world beyond colonialism.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3565. Hist Latin Amer to 1930. 3 Credit Hours.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3566. Race, Gender, and Empire in the Iberian World. 3 Credit Hours.

Latin America is a culturally rich and diverse region. Its complex and fascinating history is the product of different worlds and cultures coming together in the 16th century. In this course we will analyze this encounter and its consequences by looking at two main topics: race and gender. Following a chronological order that starts with the conquest of the Americas by the Spaniards and Portuguese in the 16th century and ends with the breakdown of the Spanish empire in the early nineteenth century, the course will explore the ways in which different peoples have interacted. We will discuss the various roles men and women assumed in these societies and the significance of race. In so doing, we will attempt a deeper analysis of the social dynamics of Latin America in the past that will give us a better understanding of its present and future. Note: For history majors, this course is in the "Global/Comparative" category.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3571. Israel: History, Politics and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course traces the political and social history of modern Israel/Palestine since the late 19th century, examining the evolution of Zionism; the relationship between Jews and Muslims; the conflict between Zionists and Arabs; the development of the Jewish settlement in Palestine; and the creation of the State of Israel. It explores Israeli politics, society and identity, especially the role of immigration, ethnicity and religion, and also discusses the wars and tensions between Israel and neighboring Arab states; the status of the Arab/Palestinian minority in Israel; and the growth of Palestinian nationalism, the PLO and Hamas. Through studying Israeli history, politics and society this course helps students gain an understanding of the ongoing conflict in the Middle East.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3572. Modern Middle East. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys the history of the modern Middle East, analyzing some of the great controversies of the region. How the modern Middle East arose, why so many conflicts in the region in modern times have taken place, why the Great Powers have been so involved, and how the struggles of the working class have fared are among the questions to be addressed.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3580. Topics in Asian History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3675. Third World Women's Lives. 3 Credit Hours.

Explores the themes of imperialism, colonialism, class, race, interlocking oppressions, commitments to family and community, migration, resistance/insurgency/revolution, collective action, memory, and alternative visions as crossroads of identities in Third World women's lives. Utilizes a variety of source materials with emphasis on the voices of Third World women themselves (testimonies, oral interviews, and documentary visual media). Compares these life texts to those of other working women as they speak to the experiences of being women of color or poor white women in a late capitalist world. Develops the tools for understanding the experiences and perspectives of diverse groups of women to create liberating ways of thinking and living.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3696. Asian Women in Transition. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces and compares the experiences of women in Asia and Asian women in migration to the United States in the modern period, including rural and urban women, and ordinary and elite women in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include women in households, women and work, and women's activism.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3697. Intermediate Writing Seminar in African, Asian, Caribbean, and Latin American History. 3 Credit Hours.

Complete descriptions of current offerings can be found on the History Department web site (www.temple.edu/history). All seminars are writing-intensive; frequent writing assignments will help students develop or practice specific writing skills and the research skills that will be critical for success in the senior-level capstone seminar.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3711. The City in History. 3 Credit Hours.

From Catal Huyuk and Sumer to Florence and Xian to Manchester and Ahmedabad to Los Angeles and Mexico City we examine the significance of the city in the economic, political, social, and cultural life of our planet. Why and how have people created such different kinds of cities? What interest groups have dominated them? What strategies have planners proposed for making them more liveable? For whom? How can studies of cities in other times and places help us understand our own cities? Extensive use of visual materials and some field trips.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3721. Women in Preindustrial Societies. 3 Credit Hours.

Women's experience in the preindustrial period varied greatly across different regions of the globe, yet there were also important commonalities. This course examines comparatively, in various traditional European and Third World societies, some important themes in women's history: work, sexuality, marriage, social control, science and medicine, and religion. It also discusses ways of studying the history of people who were for the most part not literate and left few traces of their own thoughts and experiences.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3741. Comparative Slavery. 3 Credit Hours.

This course deals with the study of comparative slavery in four distinct historical-cultural domains: Ancient Greece, "New World" slavery, Arab-Ottoman Islamic civilizations, and Africa. The course analyzes the four locales separately, and compares similarities in the general structure of slave societies as well as differences in their details. Issues pertaining to manumission or the lack of it and integration of ex-slaves into the larger society will be discussed.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3751. Colonialism and Decolonization. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at the decline and fall of the modern European empires. It adopts a case study method to allow students to acquire in-depth knowledge of the colonial and post-colonial environment in four distinct regions of the world: Indonesia, North Africa, India and West Africa/Britain. The course examines the cultural construction of colonialism in Indonesia and North Africa, examining such issues as relations between the colonizers and the colonized peoples in terms of race and gender, construction of an imperial architecture and environment, and modes of resistance to the imperial project. Moving to India, the course looks at the rise of colonial nationalism, including the various discourses and tactics that are implemented to resist, modify, and ultimately abolish colonialism. Finally, the course examines the repercussions of imperialism for the contemporary, discussing post-colonial theory and the cultural, economic, political, and demographic effects of de-colonization on both Europe and its former colonies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3811. World Economy Since 1945. 3 Credit Hours.

At the turn of the millennium, economic globalization is profoundly transforming many long-standing patterns of human existence. Public discussion about globalization, nevertheless, remains often shallow and misleading. This course aims to offer a deeper perspective on the present by examining the experience of the world economy over the formative period since World War II. It concentrates on two basic questions: 1) How did the domestic and global foundations of the current world economy come into being over the last half century? And 2) What are the implications of this historical process for our immediate and future lives? As an intermediate level course, it assumes no prior student backgrounds in either history or economics--only a lively interest in learning about broad historical trends and in developing intellectual skills. In addition to discussion, lecture, and common readings, methods of instruction in the course include use of a computer-assisted classroom to provide image and text projections, video clips, and Internet linkages.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 3860. Topics in World History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3870. Topics in World History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3880. Topics in Comparative History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3900. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3910. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 3911. Honors World Economy Since 1945. 3 Credit Hours.

At the turn of the millennium, economic globalization is profoundly transforming many long-standing patterns of human existence. Public discussion about globalization, nevertheless, remains often shallow and misleading. This course aims to offer a deeper perspective on the present by examining the experience of the world economy over the formative period since World War II. It concentrates on two basic questions: 1) How did the domestic and global foundations of the current world economy come into being over the last half century? And 2) What are the implications of this historical process for our immediate and future lives? As an intermediate level course, the World Economy Since 1945 it assumes no prior student backgrounds in either history or economics--only a lively interest in learning about broad historical trends and in developing intellectual skills. In addition to discussion, lecture, and common readings, methods of instruction in the course include use of a computer-assisted classroom to provide image and text projections, video clips, and Internet linkages.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4034. Historiography and Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Each generation of historians reinterprets and rewrites the past according to the political and social views of its time. When we read history we learn just as much, if not more, about the times in which the historian is writing as we learn about the era he/she is writing about. Historical facts do not change, but the choice of which facts are to be emphasized and the interpretation of those facts reflect the Zeitgeist of the historian. A further complicating issue is that there are also many differences of opinion within each generation, debates over the basic issue of history as consensus or history as conflict. This course will introduce students to the various ways professional historians have interpreted and written about the past, from 19th century German historian Leopold von Ranke's association of history with scientific objective (wie es eigentlich gewesen), through the challenges of progressivism, relativism, universalism, and particularism. Is history the study of the past for its own sake or should historians turn on the past, as Carl Becker observed, and use it to influence the present? Students will also be trained in the types of research methods and archival research employed by professional historians and the problems historians encounter in evaluating and interpreting historical sources. This is an intensive reading seminar that will be conducted chiefly through discussion. There will be lectures on the evolution of historiography as well as lectures on research methods. Members of the class will be expected to do demanding work each week reading the assignments, preparing papers, and leading discussions on the results of their weekly research and writing.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4221. The American South. 3 Credit Hours.

What makes the South different from the rest of the United States? This seminar will explore the history of the American South from the colonial period to 1900, and it will engage the changing nature and meaning of "southern distinctiveness." We will focus on the history of slavery and race relations; on gender roles and relations; on sectionalism and the origins of the Civil War; on Reconstruction and the "New South"; and on social, regional, political and ideological divisions within the South.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4280. Special Topics - American History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor for a specific course description. The history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) provides a listing of the specific topics offered each semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4282. Independent Study. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4289. Fieldwork in History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester, please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4296. American History Writing Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will focus on a special topic in U.S. history and assist students in the development of advanced-level skills in historical writing, argumentation, and research. Students will complete a research project during the semester. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4297. Social History of American Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

This course in the history of public health examines the shifting boundaries between public and private medicine, professional authority and personal responsibility, and prevention and therapy from the colonial period into the 20th century. Specific topics include epidemics, environmental concerns, occupational hazards, immigration, and ethnicity.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4400. Special Topics in History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester; please consult with the instructor for a specific course description. The history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) provides a listing of the specific topics offered each term.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4480. Special Topics: European History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester; please consult with the instructor for a specific course description. The history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) provides a listing of the specific topics offered each term.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4496. Eastern Europe: Nationalism, Authoritarianism, and Communism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the development of nation-states of Eastern Europe in the 20th century, including Poland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and Albania, as well as Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and their successor states. Topics include the emergence of national identities; the break-up of the Habsburg, Russian and Ottoman Empires; the redrawing of boundaries and problems of national minorities after World War I; the rise of authoritarian governments during the interwar years; World War II and the Communist takeovers; the varieties of Communist regimes and the impact of Communism on daily life; the post-Communist era and the resurgence of nationalism and authoritarianism in the Balkans. Each student will be expected to specialize in one country or nationality.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4497. European History Writing Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will focus on a special topic in European history and assist students in the development of advanced-level skills in historical writing, argumentation, and research. Students will complete a research project during the semester. Seminar format. See the history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) for the specific topics offered each semester.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4540. Special Topics: Latin American History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester; please consult with the instructor for a specific course description. The history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) provides a listing of the specific topics offered each term.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4623. Asian Biographies: Traditional and Otherwise. 3 Credit Hours.

This course exposes upper-level undergraduates to one of the most important issues in Asian historiography: the uses of biography and autobiography. Both in the Confucian and Islamic traditions the writing of the lives of virtuous men has been central to the establishment of State legitimacy and the transmission of cultural values. (Only rarely have women been included in the pantheon of heroes.) We will examine traditional approaches to biography and autobiography, and then look at how the tradition has evolved and been adapted to the needs of modern states, as well as by civil society. Special attention will be paid to the way in which communist states have modified traditions of biography.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4628. Running Black: Race to Empire. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the interconnected histories of race- and empire-making since the modern period. From 15th century European explorations in Africa to 20th century U.S. invasions in the circum-Caribbean, we analyze how notions of physical, cultural and psychological difference have shaped and been shaped by unequal struggles over rule, authority and self-determination. In the process, we will assess various theoretical approaches pertaining to our topics, from the Marxism of a C.L.R. James to the 'Postcolonial' perspective of an Aime Cesaire.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
HIST 3000 to 3999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

HIST 4670. Special Topics: African History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester; please consult with the instructor for a specific course description. The history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) provides a listing of the specific topics offered each term.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4680. Special Topics: Asian History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester; please consult with the instructor for a specific course description. The history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) provides a listing of the specific topics offered each term.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4696. Writing Seminar in Asian, African, or Latin American History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will focus on a special topic in Third World history and assist students in the development of advanced level skills in historical writing, argumentation, and research. Students will complete a research project during the semester.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4697. Modern Japan: Empire, War, Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Was early modern Japan (1600-1867) static or dynamic? Do the roots of Japan's modern achievements (1868-1945) lie in her early modern culture? What happened to Japan after the 1868 Meiji Restoration, and why? Was modernity a blessing or a curse? We'll find answers to questions like these as we survey Japanese society, culture, and events and trends at home and abroad from the Tokugawa shogunate to the Pacific War. Assignments focus on writing a comparative review.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4698. Revolutionary Mexico. 3 Credit Hours.

Early in the twentieth century, Mexico experienced a powerful upheaval that left its imprint upon the country for generations, bringing to the fore questions of constitutionalism, land tenure, worker rights, indigenous culture, and national sovereignty. The Mexican Revolution restructured society, the state, and the country's relationship with the United States and the world. Revolutionary Mexico examines the classic years of the Revolution, 1910-1940, engaging students in primary document research and in examination of the historical controversies that the Revolution has engendered. Instruction takes place through discussion, lecture, film, reading, and computer projection.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4880. Special Topics: World/Comparative History. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester; please consult with the instructor for a specific course description. The history department web site (www.temple.edu/history) provides a listing of the specific topics offered each term.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4897. Contemporary Theory and Practice of History. 3 Credit Hours.

Students who enroll in this course will be given an opportunity to reflect on the achievements, and also the shortcomings, of the academic discipline of history. Special attention will be paid to the history of the discipline in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, to the discipline's relationship to other forms of scholarship, and to the various controversies that are currently roiling within the historical profession.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4934. Honors Historiography and Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed for upper-level history Honors majors, and for upper-level students more generally who are working on research projects that involve historical inquiry. The course has as a starting point three fundamental questions: 1) How do historians frame meaningful research problems? 2) What kinds of basic tools do historians use to carry out archival research? 3) How do they craft persuasive arguments? The precise topic of the course varies from year to year, but students will be able to pursue research topics of their own design. History Honors majors will use this course to develop the topic of their Honors Thesis.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4968. Honors Hitler's Europe: War, Genocide, Resistance. 3 Credit Hours.

What was it like to live in Europe during World War II? This course will examine the history of Europe between 1939 and 1945 with a particular emphasis on the consequences of military occupation by Germany of various European countries, including France, the Netherlands, Poland, Greece, Yugoslavia and Italy. It will focus in depth on the structures of authority and power the Germans imposed in occupied lands; it will examine the genocidal project of the German occupation; and it will explore the various forms of resistance that local peoples organized in opposition to German occupation. We will read a wide range of original sources, autobiographies, and recent historical scholarship. NOTE: This is an Honors course. Special authorization required for non-majors.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 4982. Honors Independent Study. 3 Credit Hours.

The Honors Independent Study is open to History majors pursuing Honors. It consists of an intensive research project, guided by a History Department faculty member, that will result in a significant piece of scholarship.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HIST 4997. Honors Thesis Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is the second part of the year-long thesis writing sequence for honors scholars. It will culminate in the completion of a major research paper. The seminar consists of workshops designed to help students organize their research material and draft and revise their thesis. Students will further refine their writing skills through presentations, peer critiques, and individual consultations with the instructor. The course fulfills the writing seminar requirement for history majors. It is open to honors scholars and history majors.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
HIST 4934|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.