Environmental Studies

www.cla.temple.edu/gus

Melissa Gilbert, Chair of Geography & Urban Studies
309 Gladfelter Hall
215-204-4429
mgilbert@temple.edu

Jeremy Mennis, Undergraduate Chair
328 Gladfelter Hall
215-204-4748
jmennis@temple.edu

Anne Eckert, Administrator
1008A Gladfelter Hall
215-204–9209
ake@temple.edu

Julia Falcon, Student Services Coordinator
338A Gladfelter Hall
215-204-3386
guses@temple.edu

Max Andrucki, Internship Coordinator
325B Gladfelter Hall
215-204-1233
max.andrucki@temple.edu

Tycina Cousin, Coordinator
215-204-7692
tcousin@temple.edu

Advising
guses@temple.edu

The Environmental Studies major and minor examine the nature, causes, and consequences of human interactions with the environment. Students in Environmental Studies are equipped with the intellectual and methodological tools to understand and address the crucial environmental issues of our time and the impact on individuals, society, and the planet. 

The major and minor focus on the four themes of globalization, sustainability, social justice, and geographic methods that are increasingly central to understanding the serious environmental challenges we face. The Environmental Studies program is housed in the Department of Geography and Urban Studies and Environmental Studies majors and minors learn geographic theory and methods that examine the complexity of human-environmental interactions; the increasing interconnectedness of the global economy, environment, culture and politics; and the importance of place/context in people's daily lives. 

Environmental Studies students are introduced to environmental processes, contemporary environmental issues and policies, and geospatial technologies, including GIS, and qualitative and quantitative social science research methods. The Environmental Studies gateway courses are designed to develop the theoretical and methodological frameworks and tools necessary to understand the relationships between people and their environment as they interact through local and global connections. In required courses and electives, students examine environmental policy and the role of political institutions; the geography of natural resources; environmental decision-making; natural hazards and risk assessment; environmental ethics and legal issues; health and the environment; environmental justice; food access; etc. The electives give students the opportunity to develop an area of emphasis around their particular interests. Students focus on an individualized research project in their Senior Research Seminar. Each student's program is developed with a departmental advisor to suit individual interests and is designed to maximize educational and career opportunities. We encourage our students to incorporate a semester abroad and/or an internship into their plan of study.

Career Preparation

Environmental Studies graduates are especially competitive in the job market because of their technical and critical thinking skills, a sense of the complexity of interactions between humans and the environment, and their ability to synthesize information at a variety of scales. Students have the opportunity to gain technical skills in spatial statistics, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), cartographic production and design, and qualitative methods that are highly valued by employers. Our graduates find employment with nonprofits (domestic and international), planning or government agencies, consulting firms, and citizens' organizations. Many also go on to graduate programs in geography, planning, environmental studies, law, and other fields. The Department of Labor expects that employment for geographers, planners, and other geographic professions will grow at a rate of twenty percent or more for the next decade.

Programs Offered

We offer a Bachelor of Arts and a minor in Environmental Studies, and a certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Many of our students choose to complete a double major, a minor in a complementary discipline, and/or the GIS certificate.

Double-Counting Across Curricula

Many students elect to take a combination of the Environmental Studies major or minor and the Geography and Urban Studies major or minor, as they are complementary programs.

The ONLY courses that can double-count between the Environmental Studies and the Geography and Urban Studies majors are: ENST 3161 Spatial Statistics/GUS 3161 Spatial Statistics; ENST 2097 Research Design in Environmental StudiesGUS 2197 Research Design in Geography and Urban StudiesENST 3062 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems/GUS 3062 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems. When used for the major in either program, these courses may not be used to fulfill the minor elective requirements of the other program. Note GUS 4198 Senior Seminar in Geography and Urban Studies and ENST 4198 Senior Research Seminar are NOT cross-listed seminars. Anyone pursuing a double major in Geography and Urban Studies and Environmental Studies must take both capstone courses.

Students are not permitted to combine a major or minor in Environmental Studies and a major or minor in Environmental Science in the College of Science and Technology.

Themes

The Department has identified several informal areas of concentration to assist students in making course selections. These do not constitute formal tracks but rather provide guidelines for developing a personalized curriculum. Students can focus on the following themes:

  • Globalization
  • Social Justice
  • Urban Sustainability
  • Geographic Methods

Internships

We encourage students to apply their skills and knowledge in a credit-bearing internship that utilizes their academic training.  Assignments at planning, social service, environmental and other agencies, as well as at firms that specialize in mapping and geographic data analysis, have helped in securing employment opportunities after graduation. The internship is complemented by a seminar in which students reflect on their experiences. Contact Dr. Andrucki (max.andrucki@temple.edu) for more information on this opportunity. 

Certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

This certificate is open to undergraduate students in all majors at Temple University. This four-course certificate introduces students to information technology and spatial analysis. GIS skills are increasingly in demand by employers and according to the Department of Labor, the industry has a high annual growth rate of 35 percent. Fields that use GIS skills include public health, social and natural sciences, journalism, urban and ecological planning, criminal justice, engineering, design, communications, and business, etc. Students interested in the Certificate in GIS should see that section of this Bulletin or contact guses@temple.edu with questions.

Gamma Theta Upsilon

We nominate students for membership in the National Honorary Society in Geography on the basis of GPA. Students, who are initiated annually, can submit articles to the GTU journal and apply for national scholarships. 

Courses

ENST 0842. Sustainable Environments. 3 Credit Hours.

Americans account for over a quarter of all fossil fuel consumption, own more cars than there are licensed drivers, and build new homes 40 percent larger than they did in 1975, despite shrinking household size. We feel for the pandas and polar bears, while contributing mightily to global climate change, resource inequity, and ecosystem destruction. How do we reckon with environmental crises at multiple scales, from the neighborhood to the atmosphere and oceans? "Think globally, act locally" environmentalists admonish us! Direct our vast human ingenuity and collective spirit toward technologies and behaviors that bring peace with the planet. Course mission: enhance your capability to make informed choices, based on a sound understanding of the ecological, technological, economic, political, and ethical dimensions of environmental sustainability. NOTE: This course fulfills a Science & Technology (GS) requirement for students under GenEd and Science & Technology Second Level (SB) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed EES/Geology 0842 or GUS 0842.

Course Attributes: GS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2001. Environment and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course emphasizes the human dimensions of the relationship between societies and their natural environments. Students will be introduced to those ecological principles that are necessary to understand cultural, social, political, and economic questions at a variety of geographic scales.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2002. Physical Geography. 4 Credit Hours.

Physical Geography is a foundational course for Geography and Environmental Studies, providing a basic introduction to physical phenomena and processes. It is about the earth’s spheres: the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere. We will spend about two-thirds of our time on the basics of earth-sun relations, the earth’s atmosphere and oceans, climate and weather, and water resources. The other third of the course is principally about tectonic processes and geomorphology, as well as a culminating section on the earth’s biomes (major geographic regions defined mainly by climate and characterized by distinct communities of flora and fauna). The main objectives are to broaden and deepen your understanding of our physical environment. Moreover, you should be able to apply what you’ve learned to critical analysis of various timely and important issues—such as climate change, vulnerability to environmental hazards, and approaches to mitigating and adapting to environmental change. Though this course focuses on the physical environment, the geographic approach is very much about the relationships between humans and their environments, between nature and society. We will not view the physical environment in isolation from human dimensions and interactions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2017. Population Geography. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to human populations with respect to size, composition and spatial distribution, and the issues surrounding the geographic distribution of populations at the world, regional, and local level. Emphasis will be placed on the role of population processes (mortality, fertility, migration), and population structures (age, gender, ethnicity), on economic, social, technological and political development and changes in different parts of the world. Topics covered in this course include: population policies, theories of population change, international and domestic migration flows, cultural and economic influences on population processes, urbanization, and population related issues such as food insecurity, political conflict, poverty, health and disease, and environmental degradation. Lectures and exercises will also familiarize students to publicly available population data and introduce basic analytical techniques used to measure fertility, mortality and migration.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2025. Environmental Law and Regulation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course analyzes how our society protects (or fails to protect) the environment through law and regulation. Students will examine and compare several U.S. environmental laws that are designed to redress environmental damage and to protect the environment. In doing so, they will analyze the relative costs and benefits of various forms of environmental regulation within the context of the American political, administrative, and legal systems. The course focuses on U.S. environmental law, but will also consider the increasingly important field of international environmental law and agreements. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under ENST 3025. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2051. The Urban Environment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the interactions between theory, policy, and the urban environment. Students have the opportunity to study the urban environment not only as a physical landscape or natural ecosystem, but also as a constructed landscape shaped by local, regional and global social, economic and political processes. The course addresses issues that continue to challenge urban society, including environmental injustice and racism, degradation of local environmental quality, the impact of local-global relationships on community-scale environments and the commodification of nature.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2096. Problems of Environmental Quality. 3 Credit Hours.

Specific environmental problems, especially in the Philadelphia area. Students acting as research teams seek better understanding of such problems and practical solutions to them. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS and ENST 4096. Students who have earned credit under the prior number will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2097. Research Design in Environmental Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introductory survey of research design in Environmental Studies. It is designed to allow students to explore what it means to conduct social science research, particularly around issues of sustainability. Students have the opportunity to learn how to research using scholarly articles, write a literature review, and collect and analyze primary and secondary data. Methods covered include case study research, interview design and technique, analysis of census data, and tools commonly used in community and participatory action research. Individual assignments will focus on researching sustainability. This is a writing intensive course and will require extensive writing and revision of your assignments in a semester long assignment sequence.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2157. Environmental Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the ethical dimensions of several contemporary environmental controversies. The course examines the major theoretical approaches to environmental ethics, including human-centered (anthropocentric), animal-centered (zoocentric), and nature-centered (biocentric and ecocentric) value systems, as well as the most important critiques of these ethical approaches. The course will also address specific issues such as biodiversity and wilderness preservation; human use of animals as food, entertainment, and research subjects; environmental racism and toxic dumping; sustainable development, population and consumption.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2596. Philosophical Perspectives on the Environment. 3 Credit Hours.

Just as the question of the relationship of the individual to society is a perpetual concern, so is the question of the relationship of the individual (and society) to the natural environment. This course addresses this latter question. Issues of environmental ethics will constantly be lurking behind the scenes even when not directly at issue. A dominant theme will be the concept of nature itself. It has undergone some amazing changes during its remarkable history, and these will be explored especially from the point of view of recent feminist thinking.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 2957. Honors Environmental Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the ethical dimensions of several contemporary environmental controversies. The course examines the major theoretical approaches to environmental ethics, including human-centered (anthropocentric), animal-centered (zoocentric), and nature-centered (biocentric and ecocentric) value systems, as well as the most important critiques of these ethical approaches. The course will also address specific issues such as biodiversity and wilderness preservation; human use of animals as food, entertainment, and research subjects; environmental racism and toxic dumping; sustainable development, population and consumption.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3000. Special Topics in Environmental Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Variable offerings on special topics that are not part of the standard roster of courses. Check with the Environmental Studies office and/or web site (www.temple.edu/cla/es) for details on Special Topics courses.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ENST 3001. Earth Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

What ethical relationship do human beings have to the natural world? What cultural and religious values, conceptions, and assumptions have shaped human interactions with the environment? Through also examining practical issues such as sustainability, technology, and urban living, students will assess individual life-styles and alternative visions of the good life on planet Earth.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3004. Geography of Natural Resources. 3 Credit Hours.

The material goods you use on a daily basis (e.g. food, phones, furniture) are linked to the production of natural resources. This course helps us to understand how our everyday consumption patterns are connected to resource production and distribution on a global scale and what the social, environmental, and economic impacts of natural resource production are. To explore the complicated intersection of resource management, economics, and development, we examine the literature on natural resource development, allocation, management, and geopolitics as they relate to economic systems and "development." We draw on case studies that include production for the global market, as well as local subsistence systems. Through these cases, we examine the geography of resource flows, from the sites of extraction to the sites of consumption. We consider the role of technology and capital investment in the production of resources, property institutions and regulatory regimes, commodity chains, and sustainability concerns associated with resource production. The production of and competition for the control of key natural resources, by corporations, societies, and states, are critical processes in constructing the global economy. These processes materially transform the conditions of societies, as well as, contribute to the shaping of those societies, politically and economically.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ENST 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ENST 2002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ENST 3015. The Geographic Basis of Land Use Planning. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the forces that influence land use planning in and around American metropolitan regions. Considers economic perspectives (land values), public interest perspectives (zoning subdivision, housing and building codes, redevelopment and renewal programs, etc.), and social perspectives of land use. Also examines separately housing, commercial locations, and industrial development. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS and ENST 4015. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3051. Environmental Policy Issues. 3 Credit Hours.

How are environmental policies formulated and implemented in the U.S.? Topics include the role of citizen participation in decision-making, the place of environmental impact assessment, environmental justice and equity, intergovernmental relations, and environmental obligations of the U.S. toward less developed countries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ENST 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 3052. Environmental Problems in Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

Japan is used as an introduction and model for examining environmental issues in several East and Southeast Asian countries. Emphasis is on deforestation, river basin development, urban planning, ecotourism, and the role of non-governmental organizations.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ENST 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 3053. Climatology. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, we study global climate patterns and the underlying processes that shape them. Among the specific topics we examine are: global distribution of individual climate elements, upper-atmospheric waves and jet streams, use of web-based maps and data, construction of climate models, U.S. climate regions, and major global climatic regions. In the course's final weeks, we consider historic climates, climate change mechanisms, and forecasted future climates.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3054. Energy, Resources, and Conservation. 3 Credit Hours.

Vital nonrenewable resources are identified and their global and North American distribution, character, and utilization studied. Special attention to energy sources now in short supply and to benign renewable sources for future needs.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ENST 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 3055. Geography of Hazards. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a synthesis of the social and natural dimensions of disasters. Students become familiar with the concept that disasters emerge when the specific characteristics of hazards (e.g. volcanoes, droughts, floods, tsunamis) intersect with social vulnerability (e.g. class, race, gender). Case studies from around the world are used to elaborate and explore this concept. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS and ENST 4051. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3056. Political Ecology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the broad themes of political ecology as an academic discipline as well as a set of theoretical and methodological tools. Historically political ecology has focused on the rural developing world, but more recent work has branched out into environmental justice and resource use in industrialized societies. The course covers the concepts that have distinguished political ecology from other types of analysis like cultural and human ecology. It also introduces students to the construction of theory including a consideration of space, scale, justice, feminism, property, and nature. Finally, the course presents students with diverse case studies that may include topics like resource use, mining, bio-prospecting, forestry, conservation, fisheries, "sustainable" development, and eco-tourism. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS and ENST 4056. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3061. Fundamentals of Cartography. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to cartography and computer mapping. Through hands-on exercises, students will manipulate data, compare map projections, design, execute, and reproduce small-scale thematic maps suitable for publication using computer software. A final project involves the production of maps in color. NOTE: No prior computer knowledge is necessary.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3062. Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course teaches the theory and practical use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Major components of the course include vector and raster spatial data models and operations, including vector overlay and raster map algebra. At the end of the course students are expected to have an understanding of elementary GIS theory, working knowledge of a GIS software package, and the ability to develop GIS-based solutions to geographic modeling and analysis tasks.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3063. Environmental Remote Sensing. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will teach the basic principles of environmental remote sensing using aerial photography and satellite imagery. Topics covered include the mechanics of aerial photography and satellite remote sensing systems, photointerpretation, image rectification, and image processing and classification. Emphasis will be on urban and environmental applications.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3064. Qualitative Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

This class is designed to expose students to the purpose, scope and procedures of qualitative research, applied in different disciplines but especially in environmental studies, geography, and urban planning. It provides an opportunity for students to create qualitative research design schemes, and critically analyze research using these methods.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 2097|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 3068. Environmental Impact Assessment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the methods of environmental impact assessment (EIA). During the course of your environmental careers, most of you will be expected to conduct, reference, evaluate, or otherwise incorporate EIA into your work. Most EIA’s incorporate a diverse set of research methods—and an understanding of a wide-ranging set of research methodologies, and when and how to deploy them—is a central objective for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 3069. GIS for Health Data Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has emerged as an essential tool for health researchers and practitioners. This course provides an introduction to the most common geographic methods utilized in health research and spatial epidemiology for mapping and analyzing health disparities, disease risk factors, health services and geographic variation in health outcomes and disease. Through lecture and laboratory exercises students will learn how to create and edit spatial data, create disease maps, develop neighborhood-based measures, conduct geographic cluster detection and point pattern analysis, map geographic health disparities, measure access to health services, and critically assess potential study bias introduced from missing geographic data or positional accuracy. Selected case studies will be presented in order to highlight methods and techniques and hands-on experience will be gained through laboratory exercises and real-world applications. Guest speakers will be invited to share their real-world examples of GIS in health research and practice.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3161|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3161|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR SOC 3201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR STAT 2103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 2219|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR CJ 2602|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ANTH 3771|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 3071. Medical Geography. 3 Credit Hours.

Medical geography applies concepts and methods from the discipline of geography to study medical and health related events and topics. Medical geography has a close disciplinary tie with epidemiology, biostatistics, medical ecology and medical anthropology, but it is differentiated by its focus on the spatial distributions of health/medical related events. By focusing on geographic scale and the location of health events we can more accurately account for data variability and provide a more accurate representation of a population's health. Throughout the course, we will examine numerous examples of how geographic scale and measurement can influence study results or how health resources or events appear to be distributed. The class will provide a broad introduction to medical geography touching on the topics of disease ecology, geographical information systems for public health, disparities in health and healthcare, and various methods and data sources for analyzing health/medical data. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under ENST and GUS 4071. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3085. Internship in Environmental Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is offered in both fall and spring semesters to accompany on-the-job training with local consulting firms, planning agencies, private companies, non-profits, and various state, local and federal agencies of government, mostly but not exclusively in the Philadelphia metro area. Students will apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in an array of both natural and social science courses to address some of the major environmental challenges on local, regional, and international scales. Students need to arrange their own positions, usually after consulting with the department's internship coordinator. The search for a placement should start several months in advance of the semester or summer session when the internship will take place. The course is available to GUS/ES majors only. NOTE: The student's advisor and/or Environmental Studies Internship Coordinator arrange internship placement and evaluation. Duplicate credit warning: This course was previously taught under GUS 4085/ENST 4085. Students who have earned credit under the prior number(s) will not earn additional credit if the course is repeated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3097. Environment and Development. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at the interaction between human and ecological systems and economic development. We begin with a historical overview of the impact of human communities on the environment. We then shift attention to the environmental impacts of European expansion from the 1600s to the present. In the final section of the course we examine specific cases that highlight the ideas discussed previously. The cases focus on settlement systems, environmental factors and conflict, sustainable systems, vulnerability, water issues, etc. This course requires active participation.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ENST 1051|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 1951|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 3152. U.S. Environmental Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

An analytical examination of the development and execution of governmental policies in such areas as air and water pollution control, control of atomic energy, and planning of space exploration program.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3161. Spatial Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to statistical analysis with an emphasis on urban applications. The course covers basic statistical principles of sampling, probability, and tests of significance, measures of association; ordinary least squares regression; factor, principal component and cluster analysis and an introduction to spatial applications of these tools. The course is focused on the practical application of these techniques through exposure to the rationale and principles underpinning them. Students will attend lectures and complete problem sets that provide practical experience in the application of the theoretical concepts and methodologies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MATH 0702|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 3170. Methods in Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

A series of practical, topical courses which deal with aspects of archaeological fieldwork and laboratory analysis. The topic or focus of the course varies by semester and includes: field methods; ceramic analysis; lithic analysis; soils and stratigraphy.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ENST 3175. Heritage Management in Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

The United States and other governments of the world have legal mandates to manage cultural resources on behalf of the public. This course focuses on the archaeological component of cultural resources management in the United States and its linkage with environmental and developmental planning. Participants are given a working knowledge of how the system works, and how to work within it as a professional through a series of readings, classroom discussions, and hands-on exercises. Topic coverage includes: relevant legislation; the phased approach to archaeological and historical research; state and federal review procedures; proposal writing; interacting with clients, native peoples, and the public; professional ethics and standards. The nature of heritage management in other countries is considered for comparative purposes and as a way of illuminating the historical, socio-economic, and legal factors that have shaped the practice in the United States. NOTE: This course helps to satisfy topical requirements in the Anthropology major and the Environmental Studies major.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3189. Field Session in Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

Techniques and concepts of field archaeology. Students will be expected to spend the greatest part of the session in the field during the excavation of prehistoric and historic sites.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ENST 3214. North American Environmental History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the interactions between human societies and the natural world in North America. That relationship is complex: the environment both reflects people's influences and affects human history. Through lectures, readings, and discussion, participants in this course will examine this reciprocal relationship. Issues to be discussed in the course include Native American management of the environment; the effects of the European ecological invasion; resource exploitation in the industrial era; the foundations of the preservationist and conservationist movements at the beginning of the 20th century; the evolution of 20th century environmentalism; and the historical context of current environmental problems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3265. International Environmental Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

International negotiations and agreements on environmental problems, and comparisons of domestic environmental policymaking among selected countries. Special attention to negotiations on atmospheric and oceanic policies, international regulation of nuclear materials, and environmental aspects of international trade agreements.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3307. Transportation and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will learn to approach the modern geography of transportative possibility from a critical standpoint. Rather than accepting this contemporary geography as being the outcome of supposedly "superior" transport technologies’ rendering marginalized technologies obsolete, students will examine how processes of cultural, political, and environmental struggle have shaped, opened up, and in some cases limited the modern array of possibilities for human mobility. Waterborne, animal-based, and human-powered modes of transportation will receive special attention, as will ongoing debates and struggles over automobile planning and mass transit. The history of transportation will be presented as necessarily entangled with parallel histories of public protest, working-class knowledge, emergency logistics, human-animal relations, guerilla warfare, unrealized technologies, and political oppression. The course readings will look at many parts of the world: the United States, Canada, Southeast Asia, North Africa, the Middle East, China, Western Europe, the Caribbean, and Polynesia.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3314. Food Studies: A Geographical Perspective. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to key issues in food studies from a geographical and environmental perspective. The course includes an overview of the agricultural transitions, and examines issues of food security, access and control, ultimately focusing attention on the question of how to produce more just food systems. A major goal of this course is to give students a basic foundation from which to understand and interpret food systems as well as to familiarize students with today’s major issues in research on food.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3511. Sociology of the Environment. 3 Credit Hours.

In the first half of the course, we will focus on the interaction among four components: population size, social organization, environmental conditions and available technology. We will consider issues such as the relationships among the technology of farming, the volume of agricultural production and the availability of labor for economic development. We will also learn about "input-output" models focusing on the intensity of resource use as well as problems of waste management. In the second half of the course, we will concentrate on issues of social organization. What kinds of political arrangements do we see for the management of waste? How does the transfer of natural resources from resource-rich but economically underdeveloped countries to the United States and other industrial societies affect the social, economic and political arrangements of both groups of countries? Finally, we will address the question of whether the social will can be organized in such a way as to reduce the pressure on the environment and remaining natural resources.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 3596. Energy, Ecology, and Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

After surveying the elements of energy and ecology, and reviewing the basics of economics, this course investigates the interaction of the three. Each of the major nonrenewable and renewable energy sources is examined in light of its "eco-feasibility." The potential of energy conservation is examined, and the need for energy/environmental/economic (3-E) policy is debated. Some speculations about future 3-E scenarios are offered, as the U.S. and the rest of the world face their energy, ecological, and economic problems.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(ECON 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (ECON 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ECON 1902|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

ENST 3900. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Variable Honors offerings on special topics that are not part of the standard roster of courses. Check with the Environmental Studies office and/or web site (www.temple.edu/cla/es) for details on Special Topics courses.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ENST 3904. Honors Earth Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

What is, or should be, our relation to the natural world? Especially since we are presently living in a modern urban environment, have we perhaps outgrown nature? Is it something we have mastered? Is it primarily a luxury of sorts that we can go to for periodic enjoyment or relaxation? On the other hand, why do we seem to be in a burgeoning environmental crisis? Is it just greed? Too many people? Insufficient technology? How did we get to where we are? Or more immediately--and perhaps deeply--what fundamental beliefs, attitudes, and values shape our everyday actions, how we perceive and use (or misuse) the earth? What creative alternatives can we find, and how can we apply them? In addressing these kinds of questions we will explore both Western and Asian ways of conceiving and interacting with the natural world, past and present. Our approach will also be interdisciplinary, including materials from art, film and literature, as well a range of academic disciplines. NOTE: This is an University Honors course.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 4000. Special Topics in Environmental Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars on special topics vary according to the instructor. Check the course schedule for specific seminar topics.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ENST 4061. Cartographic Production. 3 Credit Hours.

A course concerned with aspects of storage, retrieval, and display of information within geographic information systems. Emphasis will be placed on computer mapping. NOTE: This course is cross-listed with GUS 4061; students will only receive credit for one course from GUS 4061 and ENST 4061.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ENST 3061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR GUS 3061|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 4064. Web Mapping and GIS. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, students will explore theoretical and practical concepts of Web Mapping (GIS and spatial data visualization on the Internet). From a theoretical perspective they will study advantages and techniques for publishing, visualizing and accessing maps and data on the Internet. This entails examining architectures of Web GIS/Web mapping systems, markup languages (e.g. HTML, XML, SVG, and KML), scripting languages, screen cartography, data sharing and geoportals, as well as social and critical perspectives toward web mapping. From a practical perspective they will learn to develop Web mapping applications including static and interactive platforms. They will also learn and work with some well-known open source software and libraries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 4065. Urban Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to build on the basic principles of the introductory GIS course to demonstrate how GIS may be applied to the analysis of physical and human systems. Topics of the course include vector and raster data integration; address matching, geocoding, and network analysis; terrain and hydrological analysis; and interpolation of environmental and population data. At the end of the course the student is expected to grasp advanced GIS analysis and modeling concepts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 4066. Environmental GIS. 3 Credit Hours.

Geographic Information Systems are widely used to investigate environmental processes and to develop solutions to environmental issues. This course will build upon concepts introduced in Fundamentals of GIS to investigate how the techniques, data, and interpretations from GIS analysis are applied across a variety of environmental fields. Topics to be covered include natural hazard vulnerabilities, global climate change, renewable energy potential, environmental health, and conservation.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
GUS 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR ENST 3062|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

ENST 4082. Independent Study: Environmental Studies. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Duplicate Course: This course can only be counted one time for Environmental Studies elective credit. Directed reading and research on a specific topic in Environmental Studies agreed to by student and faculty member.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

ENST 4117. Seminar in Environmental Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the student to the techniques and disciplines used in conjunction with archaeology to understand the environmental context and paleo-ecology of prehistoric cultures, as well as the nature of the archaeological record itself. Included in this survey are geology, soil and sediment analysis, geomorphology, palynology, ethnobotany and general floral analysis, phytolith analysis, zooarchaeology, and the analysis of blood and other residues found on artifacts. The range of contributions possible from interdisciplinary research will be explored in addition to how to design such research, how to communicate with specialists in other fields, and how to use existing sources of data to solve archaeological problems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 4198. Senior Research Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Students engage in research projects, either as individuals or part of a team. Seminar meetings are devoted to analysis of a small set of readings, common discussion of research issues, and preparation for life beyond the baccalaureate. NOTE: Open only to Environmental Studies students.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 4297. Social History of American Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

This course in the history of public health examines the shifting boundaries between public and private medicine, professional authority and personal responsibility, and prevention and therapy from the colonial period into the 20th century. Specific topics include epidemics, environmental concerns, occupational hazards, immigration, and ethnicity.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 4796. Biocultural Adaptations in Human Populations. 3 Credit Hours.

An evaluation of adaptation, selection, and ecological concepts as the bases for modelsintegrating human biology and culture, and for explaining change.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ENST 4896. Environmental Physiology. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of physiological and biochemical variability in human populations examined as a function of environmental adaptation. Emphasis on the responses of different populations to discernible environmental stresses.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
ANTH 2705|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.