Search Results

Academic Programs

http://bulletin.temple.edu/academic-programs/

...Affairs and Quality Assurance M.S. PH Religion B.A. , Minor M.A. , Ph.D...

Faculty

http://bulletin.temple.edu/faculty/

...Arts Zain Abdullah , Associate Professor, Department of Religion; Ph.D., The New School for Social...

Religion (REL)

http://bulletin.temple.edu/courses/rel/

Religion (REL) [object Object] [object Object]

College of Education

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/education/

...race, culture, gender, social class, sexual orientation, religion, disability or ability level. Students must avoid...

College of Liberal Arts

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/

...sciences, including anthropology, English, history, philosophy, sociology, religion, psychology and foreign languages. Many of our...

School of Social Work

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/social-work/

...origin, physical and/or mental disabilities, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation. Understand and adhere...

College of Liberal Arts

http://bulletin.temple.edu/graduate/scd/cla/

...D. Public Policy, M.P.P. Religion, M.A. Religion, Ph.D. Sociology, M.A...

Student Rights

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/about-temple-university/student-rights/

...marital status, national or ethnic origin, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation and gender...

Human Behavior (GB)

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/general-education/gb/

...specific perspectives (such as art, music, education, religion, economics, politics or education), or look at...

Race & Diversity (GD)

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/general-education/gd/

...group identifications such as gender, class, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation or disability. Race & Diversity...

Global/World Society (GG)

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/general-education/gg/

...Immigration Law Beyond Borders Philadelphia Dance Experience Religion in the World The Detective Novel The...

U.S. Society (GU)

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/general-education/gu/

...Radical Social Movements People, Places, and Environment Religion in Philadelphia Sounds of a Revolution Sport...

Bachelor of Arts in General Program

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/japan-campus/general-program-ba/

...art history, Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, philosophy, religion) or the Social Sciences (American studies, Asian...

Asian Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/asian-studies/

...the study of politics, history, society, art, religion, philosophy, and literature, each student can construct...

Religion

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/religion/

Department Chair      Khalid Blankinship, Associate Professor      617 Anderson Hall      215-204-5543      kblankin@temple.edu

Political Science, M.A.

http://bulletin.temple.edu/graduate/scd/cla/political-science-ma/

...movements; and the relationship between politics and religion. Job Prospects: Most students in the M...

Political Science, Ph.D.

http://bulletin.temple.edu/graduate/scd/cla/political-science-phd/

...movements; and the relationship between politics and religion. Job Prospects: Most Ph.D. students are...

Religion, M.A.

http://bulletin.temple.edu/graduate/scd/cla/religion-ma/

The Department of Religion at Temple University offers a 30-credit master's program. For those seeking to qualify for the Ph.D. program at Temple University or other leading universities, it offers intensive training in research methods and in special fields of concentration in religion studies. (Note: Admission to the Temple Ph.D. program requires a separate application and the completion of qualifying examinations not required for the M.A. degree.) For those who plan to teach religious studies in community colleges or high schools, it provides advanced training in methods of research and in-depth study of the world's major religious traditions. For those in various forms of religious ministry, it offers post-graduate training and exposure to the newest research methods and developments for use in understanding their own or other religious and cultural traditions. For those who wish to bring cultural and cross-cultural analytical tools to professions such as business, government, journalism, medicine, and social work, it provides additional training in research methods and graduate-level study in the major world religious and cultural traditions. For qualified persons in the general public, it allows the opportunity to acquire competence in the study of religions, values, and cultures broadly defined, and in areas of special interest to the student.

Religion, Ph.D.

http://bulletin.temple.edu/graduate/scd/cla/religion-phd/

The Temple University Department of Religion began shortly after the Supreme Court declared that the study of religion (not to be confused with its practice) in state-supported public education was commended. Temple's department broke from the "seminary model" of traditional fields, such as church history and theology, and instead committed to the multi-traditional and multi-disciplinary study of global religious traditions. This gives our program an outstanding breadth and cross-cultural diversity. We have a long history of attracting students from all over the world, and our graduates now work in universities not just in North America, but also in places such as Germany, Japan, Korea, and Malaysia.

Bachelor of Arts in American Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/american-studies/ba-american-studies/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/anthropology/general-anthropology-major/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology: Human Biology Concentration

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/anthropology/human-biology-concentration/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology: Visual Anthropology Track

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/anthropology/visual-anthropology-concentration/

...an anthropological and historical approach of its religions and artistic traditions, both ancient and contemporary...

Minor in Arabic

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/arabic/arabic-minor/

...fields such as literature, history, anthropology, and religion. This program will be of particular interest...

Bachelor of Arts in Asian Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/asian-studies/ba-asian-studies/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Minor in Chinese

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/chinese/minor-chinese/

...fields such as literature, history, anthropology, and religion. This program will be of particular interest...

Minor in Ancient Mediterranean Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/classics/minor-ancient-mediterranean-studies/

...another department, such as Anthropology, Art History, Religion, History, or Philosophy, as approved by Greek...

Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/criminal-justice/ba-criminal-justice/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Economics

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/economics/ba-economics/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/environmental-studies/ba-environmental-studies/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Geography and Urban Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/geography-urban-studies/ba-geography-urban-studies/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/global-studies/ba-global-studies/

...rights, public health, economic growth and decline, religion and ideologies, fashion and music, media and...

Bachelor of Arts in History

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/history/ba-history/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Minor in Japanese

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/japanese/minor-japanese/

...fields such as literature, history, anthropology, and religion. This program will be of particular interest...

Bachelor of Arts in Jewish Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/jewish-studies/ba-jewish-studies/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Latin American Studies

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/latin-american-studies/ba-latin-american-studies/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Political Science

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/political-science/ba-political-science/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/psychology/ba-psychology/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Religion

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/religion/ba-religion/

The Bachelor of Arts in Religion is a solid Liberal Arts degree, providing graduates with the knowledge base and the intellectual, analytical, communication, and interpersonal skills essential to succeed in any career. The faculty and course offerings provide an introduction to the major religions of the world, with an emphasis upon the comparison of traditions and their encounter with one another. Instruction is offered in African and African American religions, Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Judaism, and Daoism.

Minor in Religion

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/religion/minor-religion/

The minor in Religion is an excellent addition to the degree programs in the College of Liberal Arts or other colleges throughout Temple University. Students who have an interest in world history and providing sensitive patient care will find this program of study especially helpful.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology: Health Track

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/sociology/ba-sociology-health-track/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/liberal-arts/sociology/ba-sociology/

...Classics, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Philosophy, Religion, Russian, and Spanish in the College of...

Bachelor of Science in Therapeutic Recreation

http://bulletin.temple.edu/undergraduate/public-health/rehabilitation-sciences/bs-therapeutic-recreation/

...age, economics, race, gender, culture, sexual orientation, religion, or abilities. Accreditation The Bachelor of Science...

AAAS 8442. African Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ANTH 3326. Religion in Non-Western Cultures. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines Creole religions in the Americas and the Caribbean, focusing on the often-misunderstood practices of Cuban Santería, Haitian Voodoo, Brazilian Candomblé, and U.S Orisha-Voodoo. By exploring their colonial, national, and transnational trajectories, differences in Portuguese, Spanish, and French colonial rule will become evident as we look at the historical, political, and religious conditions shaping processes of syncretism and mimesis. The unique multi-channeled, performative aspects of these creole religions will be explored in great detail and illustrated through video and music recordings of spiritual events in which divination, drumming, myth, dance, trance and healing come to life. Confronting practitioners' insider experiences with outsiders' exoticizing perceptions - stemming from either frightening Hollywoodian representations or romanticizing state and tourist productions - we will critically address the problematic, highly contested place that these heterodox religions and their practitioners occupy in contemporary societies.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ANTH 5326. Problems in the Anthropological Study of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines some of the major themes, methods, and intellectual traditions of the study of religion in anthropology. Considered as a comparative study of religious practice, this course seeks to understand thought and behavior in worship, iconography, pilgrimage, domestic and congregational performance, mythology and cosmology, trance, dance, sacrifice, ritual experience and other dimensions of religious life as well as the way that these facets of religious culture interrelate. The study of religion in a historically complex circumstance will provide the means to examine the processes of accommodation and tension that exist in a multi-religious environment.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 0863. Religion in the World. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about the major religious traditions found worldwide today: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and several indigenous traditions. Examine the beliefs, practices, and values of these groups in order to understand the worldviews and ways of life of the people who practice them. Our interdisciplinary analysis and interpretation of specific examples of religious experience will help shed light on the overall meaning of religion and human existence. We will carefully consider examples while also focusing on particular thematic issues, like cosmology and ritual. Develop appreciation for the religious vibrancy and diversity that exist in human cultures while you actively engage in the learning process through class presentation, class participation, paper-writing, and a self-selected field trip. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: Religion 0863, 0963, 1101, C053, Asian Studies 0863, Critical Languages 0863, or Philosophy 0863.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 1101. Introduction to World Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to major world religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as a way of coming to know and appreciate the world views of other cultures. Attention to beliefs, values, and practices of these religions as ways of dealing with the issues basic to human life. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 1102. Introduction to Asian Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the major Asian religious, philosophical, and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto) with emphasis on the cultural roots of each religious tradition, the analysis of its principal teachings and practices, and the major cultural expressions in religious art, ritual, poetry, music, and scriptures. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 1902. Honors Introduction to Asian Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the major Asian religious, philosophical, and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto) with emphasis on the cultural roots of each religious tradition, the analysis of its principal teachings and practices, and the major cultural expressions in religious art, ritual, poetry, music, and scriptures. NOTE: Requires instructor's permission.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 2101. Religions of India. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the foundations, nature, and principles of classical Hinduism. An introduction to the fundamentals of Buddhism and Jainism.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 2201. Chinese Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of the development of Chinese religions from the time of Confucius to Mao, including the problem of ideological continuity in contemporary China (Maoist Marxism versus Confucianism).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 3011. Monks, Masters, and Magicians: Religion in Premodern Chinese Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers an introduction into the rich heritage of Chinese literature before 1911 with a focus on religious culture. We will follow Buddhist nuns and monks, Daoist masters and Confucian scholars on their adventures through 2000 years of Chinese history. Thematically, the class will focus on texts that show how Chinese religious traditions (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) were depicted in secular literature, but will also include narrative religious texts. From 3rd century miracle tales, to the classical novels of the Ming and Qing dynasty, we will look at Chinese religion through the lens of literature. Next to the readings themselves, we will cover more general aspects such as the relationship of literature to historical facts and notions of genre and motif as they apply to China.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 3301. Japanese Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to Japanese religions, their origins, and development in the social, cultural and intellectual history of Japan. Religions covered are: Shinto, Japanese Buddhism, folk religions, Japanese Confucianism, and the New Religions. Some attention to expression of Japanese spirituality in the fine arts, martial arts, festivals, and rituals.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

ASST 4901. Honors Comparative Philosophy of Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the comparative philosophy of Asian and Western religions. After asking what is meant by the comparative philosophy of religion, the focus will be on a comparative philosophical study of basic concepts and issues in Western and Asian religious traditions. For example, we will look at the concepts of divine or ultimate reality, arguments for the existence of an ultimate reality, the relation of faith and reason, critiques of religion, the problem of evil, the concepts of personal destiny and immortality, the relation of religion to morality, religious and mystical experience, the nature of religious language, the problem of conflicting truth claims, and religious pluralism. NOTE: This is an Honors course.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CRIT 0863. Religion in the World. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about the major religious traditions found worldwide today: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and several indigenous traditions. Examine the beliefs, practices, and values of these groups in order to understand the worldviews and ways of life of the people who practice them. Our interdisciplinary analysis and interpretation of specific examples of religious experience will help shed light on the overall meaning of religion and human existence. We will carefully consider examples while also focusing on particular thematic issues, like cosmology and ritual. Develop appreciation for the religious vibrancy and diversity that exist in human cultures while you actively engage in the learning process through class presentation, class participation, paper-writing, and a self-selected field trip. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: Religion 0863, 0963, 1101, C053, Asian Studies 0863, Critical Languages 0863, or Philosophy 0863.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GSWS 2001. Women in Religion and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of both the roles and the understanding of women in primitive and major modern religious traditions, particularly of the West, including an investigation of the authoritative writings and practices of the various traditions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GSWS 2202. Religion and Human Sexuality East & West. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to examine the attitudes and practices of the major world religions regarding human sexuality. Topics to be covered will include marriage and procreation, and such controversial issues as abortion, homosexuality and sexual activity outside of marriage. Note: Religion and Human Sexuality is taught as a cross-listed course in Religion; Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies; and LGBT Studies. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: REL 2002, LGBT 2002, GSWS 2202, WMST 2202.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0876. Religion in Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

The argument is sometimes made that religion in dense urban spaces is characteristically very different from religion as it appears elsewhere. A study of religion in Philadelphia provides numerous ways to explore that idea, especially since the city encompasses a variety of ethnic and immigrant groups, encouraging the generation of new and hybrid forms of religious life that are less possible in smaller populations. Learn how ideas of toleration and freedom, the urban environment, and immigration helped to define the role of religion in the life of this city. Study various religious traditions as they are manifested in the greater Philadelphia area and look at the influences religion has had on the fabric of Philadelphia's history and cultural life including politics, art, education, journalism and popular culture. You will visit and write about various religious sites and institutions. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed REL 0876, 0976, 1003, 1903, C052, H092 or History 0976.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 0976. Honors Religion in Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

The argument is sometimes made that religion in dense urban spaces is characteristically very different from religion as it appears elsewhere. A study of religion in Philadelphia provides numerous ways to explore that idea, especially since the city encompasses a variety of ethnic and immigrant groups, encouraging the generation of new and hybrid forms of religious life that are less possible in smaller populations. Learn how ideas of toleration and freedom, the urban environment, and immigration helped to define the role of religion in the life of this city. Study various religious traditions as they are manifested in the greater Philadelphia area and look at the influences religion has had on the fabric of Philadelphia's history and cultural life including politics, art, education, journalism and popular culture. You will visit and write about various religious sites and institutions. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed REL 0876, 0976, 1003, 1903, C052, H092 or History 0876.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GU, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 2207. Religion in the Modern United States. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the ways in which religious beliefs and practices have influenced the history of the United States in the years between 1898 and the present. Special attention is paid to lived religion, church-state relations, the relationships between religion and social power, the invention of the Judeo-Christian tradition, and the rise of new religious movements (such as Pentecostalism, the Nation of Islam, and Wicca).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HIST 8107. Religion in Modern United States. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the history of religion in the United States between 1877 and the present. In the past decade a cadre of creative scholars has focused their attention on American religious history. They have transformed the field: it is far more capacious, lively, and sophisticated than it was ten years ago. This course provides students with an introduction to the field. It also offers them a chance to focus their attention on a set of questions related to historians' determination to take religion seriously. What does it mean to do take religion seriously? What is the opposite of taking religion seriously supposed to be? In what ways, if any, has the determination to take religion seriously hampered the development of the field?

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LAS 3702. African Religions and New World Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

African religion and culture continues to exist in the religious and cultural life of African Americans. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will examine African American religion, folklore, literature, music, and communication in order to assess the continuation and transformation of African culture in the world-view of African Americans.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

LGBT 2002. Religion and Human Sexuality East & West. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to examine the attitudes and practices of the major world religions regarding human sexuality. Topics to be covered will include marriage and procreation, and such controversial issues as abortion, homosexuality and sexual activity outside of marriage. Note: Religion and Human Sexuality is taught as a cross-listed course in Religion; Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies; and LGBT Studies. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: REL 2002, LGBT 2002, GSWS 2202, WMST 2202.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0863. Religion in the World. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about the major religious traditions found worldwide today: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and several indigenous traditions. Examine the beliefs, practices, and values of these groups in order to understand the worldviews and ways of life of the people who practice them. Our interdisciplinary analysis and interpretation of specific examples of religious experience will help shed light on the overall meaning of religion and human existence. We will carefully consider examples while also focusing on particular thematic issues, like cosmology and ritual. Develop appreciation for the religious vibrancy and diversity that exist in human cultures while you actively engage in the learning process through class presentation, class participation, paper-writing, and a self-selected field trip. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: Religion 0863, 0963, 1101, C053, Asian Studies 0863, Critical Languages 0863, or Philosophy 0863.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3202. Politics & Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

What sorts of relationships exist between the world of politics and that of religious beliefs and practices that co-exist and often compete for dominance in various political systems?

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 0863. Religion in the World. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about the major religious traditions found worldwide today: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and several indigenous traditions. Examine the beliefs, practices, and values of these groups in order to understand the worldviews and ways of life of the people who practice them. Our interdisciplinary analysis and interpretation of specific examples of religious experience will help shed light on the overall meaning of religion and human existence. We will carefully consider examples while also focusing on particular thematic issues, like cosmology and ritual. Develop appreciation for the religious vibrancy and diversity that exist in human cultures while you actively engage in the learning process through class presentation, class participation, paper-writing, and a self-selected field trip. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: Religion 0863, 0963, 1101, C053, Asian Studies 0863, Critical Languages 0863, or Philosophy 0863.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 0876. Religion in Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

The argument is sometimes made that religion in dense urban spaces is characteristically very different from religion as it appears elsewhere. A study of religion in Philadelphia provides numerous ways to explore that idea, especially since the city encompasses a variety of ethnic and immigrant groups, encouraging the generation of new and hybrid forms of religious life that are less possible in smaller populations. Learn how ideas of toleration and freedom, the urban environment, and immigration helped to define the role of religion in the life of this city. Study various religious traditions as they are manifested in the greater Philadelphia area and look at the influences religion has had on the fabric of Philadelphia's history and cultural life including politics, art, education, journalism and popular culture. You will visit and write about various religious sites and institutions. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students cannot receive credit for Religion 0876 if they have successfully completed Religion 0976, 1003, 1903, C052, H092, History 0876 or 0976.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 0963. Honors Religion in the World. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about the major religious traditions found worldwide today: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and several indigenous traditions. Examine the beliefs, practices, and values of these groups in order to understand the worldviews and ways of life of the people who practice them. Our interdisciplinary analysis and interpretation of specific examples of religious experience will help shed light on the overall meaning of religion and human existence. We will carefully consider examples while also focusing on particular thematic issues, like cosmology and ritual. Develop appreciation for the religious vibrancy and diversity that exist in human cultures while you actively engage in the learning process through class presentation, class participation, paper-writing, and a self-selected field trip. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: Religion 0863, 0963, 1101, C053, Asian Studies 0863, Critical Languages 0863, or Philosophy 0863.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 0976. Honors Religion in Philadelphia. 3 Credit Hours.

The argument is sometimes made that religion in dense urban spaces is characteristically very different from religion as it appears elsewhere. A study of religion in Philadelphia provides numerous ways to explore that idea, especially since the city encompasses a variety of ethnic and immigrant groups, encouraging the generation of new and hybrid forms of religious life that are less possible in smaller populations. Learn how ideas of toleration and freedom, the urban environment, and immigration helped to define the role of religion in the life of this city. Study various religious traditions as they are manifested in the greater Philadelphia area and look at the influences religion has had on the fabric of Philadelphia's history and cultural life including politics, art, education, journalism and popular culture. You will visit and write about various religious sites and institutions. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students cannot receive credit for Religion 0976 if they have successfully completed Religion 0876, 1003, 1903, C052 or H092, History 0876 or 0976.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GU, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1001. Religion and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Religion and Society serves as the introductory course that all majors and minors in Religion must take. This course deals with such issues as: What is the nature of religion? What impact does it have on personal identity, social life, and political structures? What ethical issues arise out of the tensions between religion and society? Emphasis on contemporary Western society and forms of religion. Some historical background provided. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual & Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1003. Religion in America. 3 Credit Hours.

A historical and sociological study of practices and beliefs of various religious groups that have shaped American culture, with special attention to ethnic and racial minorities, and to women, as well as to traditional main-line groups and newer movements. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1004. Religion and the Arts. 3 Credit Hours.

Focuses on the artistic expression of theological themes in a given religious tradition. Students explore the varieties of art in that tradition, learning to recognize the plastic (architecture, sculpture, metal), visual (painting, glass, fabric), and musical art forms. Analyzing how these forms function in prayer, liturgy, and theology is of primary importance. In addition, the fundamental questions of how the religion deals with the tension between iconic/aniconic, eternal/finite, and divine/human are covered. Course also deals with what religious art means in a secular context. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1005. Introduction to Asian Religions. 1 Credit Hour.

A companion course to Religion 1102 (C050) for first-term freshmen. This course provides guidance with the assignments of the core course. Emphasis is on reading, listening, speaking, and writing within the context of the core course. Assistance is also given in the continued development of English-language skills, especially academic reading and the acquisition of a general academic vocabulary. NOTE: Offered at Temple University Japan only.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1101. Introduction to World Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the major world religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as a way of coming to know and appreciate the world-views of other cultures. Attention to beliefs, values, and practices of these religions as ways of dealing with the issues basic to human life. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1102. Introduction to Asian Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the major Asian religious, philosophical, and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto) with emphasis on the cultural roots of each religious tradition, the analysis of its principal teachings and practices, and the major cultural expressions in religious art, ritual, poetry, music, and scriptures. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1401. Introduction to Western Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will study the major Western religious beliefs, values, and practices from their origins in Africa, Europe, and the Near East through the rise and development of the culturally and religiously related traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Attention will also be given to the influence of Western religious ideas and institutions upon issues and movements in the contemporary world scene. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1902. Honors Introduction to Asian Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the major Asian religious, philosophical, and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto) with emphasis on the cultural roots of each religious tradition, the analysis of its principal teachings and practices, and the major cultural expressions in religious art, ritual, poetry, music, and scriptures. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 1903. Honors Religion in America. 3 Credit Hours.

A historical and sociological study of practices and beliefs of various religious groups that have shaped American culture, with special attention to ethnic and racial minorities, and to women, as well as to traditional main-line groups and newer movements. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: AC, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2001. Women in Religion and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of both the roles and understanding of women in major premodern and modern religious traditions, particularly of the West, including an investigation of the authoritative writings and practices of the various traditions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2002. Religion and Human Sexuality East & West. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to examine the attitudes and practices of the major world religions regarding human sexuality. Topics to be covered will include marriage and procreation, and such controversial issues as abortion, homosexuality and sexual activity outside of marriage. Note: Religion and Human Sexuality is taught as a cross-listed course in Religion; Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies; and LGBT Studies. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: REL 2002, LGBT 2002, GSWS 2202, WMST 2202.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2003. Religion and the Arts. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to explore the nexus of Religion and Art both philosophically and aesthetically. Various theories of aesthetics will be analyzed and compared. Focuses on the artistic expression of theological themes in a given religious tradition. Students explore the varieties of art in that tradition, learning to recognize the plastic (architecture, sculpture, metal), visual (painting, glass, fabric), and musical art forms. Analyzing how these forms function in prayer, liturgy, and theology is of primary importance. In addition, the fundamental questions of how the religion deals with the tension between iconic/aniconic, eternal/finite, and divine/human are covered. Course also deals with what religious art "means" in a secular context. [Duplicate Credit Warning: The prior number for this course was Religion 4002; students who successfully completed that version of the course will not earn additional credit for this version.]

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2005. Religion and Sports. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to religion and sport that explores whether sport is a kind of religion, how different religious traditions have both connected to and conflicted with sports, and religious responses to ethical dilemmas in sports. It approaches these questions through an examination of case studies. Students will be expected to attend and participate in class, do weekly readings and activities based on the cases, and research and create cases of their own. There will be a final take-home examination. Note: Students who have already taken REL 2905 will not receive duplicate credit for REL 2005.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2007. Religion in Film. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will approach the features and problems of Religion in Eastern and Western societies through the medium of film and/or film as a medium for performing religion. The course, depending on who teaches, will ask students to consider the relationships among and between film, ritual, belief, myth, and communal engagement even as it looks at how specific traditions are depicted on screen. Students will view works by filmmakers representing a global spectrum and examine how these films provide insights into these larger issues regarding popular culture, art, performance and specific religious traditions and societies. Students will be required to watch one film per week (on their own time; films will be made available via DVD on reserve or through special internet streaming resources); this will be accompanied by two regular class sessions where the film, assigned readings and the range of critical issues regarding the film’s connection to world religious traditions will be discussed. The goal of the course is to provide students with the intellectual tools to "read" films as vehicles for social and religious expressions, and to come to a more thorough understanding of how experiences and perceptions cross various cultural and religious boundaries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2101. Indian Philosophies and Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the foundations, the nature, and the principles of classical Hinduism. An introduction to the fundamentals of Buddhism and Jainism. (Formerly known as Religions of India.)

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2201. Chinese Religions - Confucius to Mao. 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of the development of Chinese religions from the time of Confucius to Mao, including the problem of ideological continuity in contemporary China (Maoist Marxism versus Confucianism).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2401. Religion in the Ancient Near East. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the religion of the pre-Biblical Near East. We will read texts from Akkadian, Egyptian, Ugaritic, Phoenician, and Mesopotamian cultures and civilizations. Special emphasis will be put on the differences and competing aspects of these religions with Israelite religion.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2701. Introduction to African American Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines African American religion in the context of four periods of African American history: the exercise of slave religious leadership in the "invisible church"; during the post-Emancipation period (1863-1900), the development of institutionalized Black religion, that is, the Black church; in the period of northern immigration (1916-1945), the evolution of many aspects of Black liturgy - especially Black gospel music; and the civil rights struggle of the 1960s and '70s.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2702. Religion in Contemporary Africa. 3 Credit Hours.

This course draws upon leading scholarly literature on religion in post-colonial Sub-Saharan Africa. Substantive examples will be drawn from South Africa, Ghana, Senegal, Uganda, Rwanda, and Congo to understand the role of religion in the creation of and the struggle against poverty, political turmoil, civil war, and the AIDS epidemic.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 2905. Honors Religion and Sports. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to religion and sport that explores whether sport is a kind of religion, how different religious traditions have both connected to and conflicted with sports, and religious responses to ethical dilemmas in sports. It approaches these questions through an examination of case studies. Students will be expected to attend and participate in class, do weekly readings and activities based on the cases, and research and create cases of their own. There will be a final take-home examination. Note: Students who have already taken REL 2005 will not receive duplicate credit for the honors version.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3002. Philosophy of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Issues in philosophy of religion, including the nature of religion, the relation between reason and faith, concepts of God and proofs of the existence of God, religious and mystical experience, the nature of religious language, the problem of evil, the relation of religion to morality, concepts of death and immortality, conflicting truth-claims of different religions, and interreligious dialogue.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3003. Religion and Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Course examines major psychological thinkers' views on religion's origins, functions, and meanings. What personality factors create and sustain religiousness? Some attention to the formation of new religious groups as well as individual spiritual life.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3004. Religion and Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a historical examination of the relationship of religion and science, leading up to current debates. A variety of views are considered, ranging from those who have viewed the relationship in terms of conflict, to those who see the two as operating in separate spheres, to those who believe that each influences the other in important and often beneficial ways.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3005. Martyrs and Suicides: Religion and Self-Chosen Death. 3 Credit Hours.

This course investigates the way religious traditions have both extolled and condemned self-chosen deaths, and how they have drawn lines that carefully distinguish the honorable and heroic from the cowardly, sinful, and crazy among those who choose their own deaths. This topic will be examined from within a variety of traditions, using a range of methods: theological, philosophical, historical, social scientific.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3011. Monks, Masters, and Magicians: Religion in Premodern Chinese Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers an introduction into the rich heritage of Chinese literature before 1911 with a focus on religious culture. We will follow Buddhist nuns and monks, Daoist masters and Confucian scholars on their adventures through 2000 years of Chinese history. Thematically, the class will focus on texts that show how Chinese religious traditions (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) were depicted in secular literature, but will also include narrative religious texts. From 3rd century miracle tales, to the classical novels of the Ming and Qing dynasty, we will look at Chinese religion through the lens of literature. Next to the readings themselves, we will cover more general aspects such as the relationship of literature to historical facts and notions of genre and motif as they apply to China.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3222. Sociology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the role of religion in constructing human realities. It emphasizes how human understandings of the world and of reality are constructed socially through collective action with religion playing a prominent role. It looks at how religion influences individual and collective action; the intersection of religion with politics and media; religion's connection to race, gender, class, and sexual orientation; and the connection between religion and science.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3301. Japanese Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to Japanese religions, their origins and development in the social, cultural, and intellectual history of Japan. Religions covered are: Shinto, Japanese Buddhism, folk religions, Japanese Confucianism, and the New Religions. Some attention to the expression of Japanese spirituality in the fine arts, martial arts, festivals, and rituals.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3701. Traditional Religions of Africa. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an interdisciplinary analysis and evaluation of selected readings on African religions that have not only survived but migrated across several continents, attracting a growing following in the contemporary societies of North America, the Caribbean, and Latin America.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 3702. African Religions and New World Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

African religion and culture continues to exist in the religious and cultural life of African Americans. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will examine African American religion, folklore, literature, music, and communication in order to assess the continuation and transformation of African culture in the world-view of African Americans.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 4096. Capstone Seminar in Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to be the final culminating class experience for undergraduate Religion majors at Temple. The topic of the course is: "Theories of Religion and Secularism." The course first will consider the history of the terminology, ideology, and underlying theories about religion and those concepts that religion has been defined against from ancient times to the present, but mainly concentrating on modern western discourses, which are those that have primarily informed the prevailing definitions. Second, we will consider various theories currently challenging or seeking to modify this received tradition of religious studies. In doing this, we will also consider the relations of the field of religious studies with other academic fields as well as with current public discourses, especially those in our country, but also to some extent those in the rest of the world. NOTE: Capstone course in major. Typically offered only in Spring semester. Students must have completed at least 5 major courses prior to taking this course.

Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 4901. Honors Comparative Philosophy of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to comparative philosophy of religion, Asian and Western. After asking what is meant by "comparative philosophy of religion," we will focus on comparative philosophical study of basic concepts and issues in Western and Asian religious traditions. For example: concepts of divine or ultimate reality; arguments for the existence of an ultimate reality; the relation of faith and reason; critiques of religion; the problem of evil; concepts of personal destiny and immortality; the relation of religion to morality; religious and mystical experience; the nature of religious language; the problem of conflicting truth-claims and religious pluralism.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 5001. Foundations in Philosophy of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Considers a selection of classical and modern European and American philosophers and the implications of their views for religious thought. Some of those whose writings are considered may include Hume, Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Kierkegaard, James, Whitehead, Rosenzweig, Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Irigaray, Habermas, and Foucault. Also may consider non-Western philosophies of religion, for example, those deriving from India or Japan.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 5002. Foundations in Religion and the Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces students to the discourse of Western social sciences on religion. Examines both modern and postmodern thinkers. Offers extensive readings in Durkheim, Marx and Weber. Then puts these modern theorists into conversation with postmodern critical theory as exemplified by Foucault and Bourdieu.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 5003. Foundations in Textual and Historical Studies in Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Teaches the issues, methods, and trends emerging in the turbulent world of historical studies. Explores the problems, ideological constraints, and new venues that occur when "religion" is introduced to historical studies. Deals with New Historicism, Cultural Materialism, postcolonial theory, various feminisms, the crisis of narrative history, and various approaches now in vogue for reading ancient texts, 1st through 6th century CE and dealing with Greco-Roman religions, Judaism, and Christianity.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 5004. Foundations in Religion and Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces psychological theorizing about the origins, motivations, and aims of religion. Psychological thought will be contextualized, showing how it has been shaped by and in turn reshapes more traditional Western reflection on the nature of persons, symbols, and faith. Simultaneously, psychological perspectives assist Western people to appreciate, interpret, and adapt non-Western forms of religion and practices. In this course, we will read classic theorists, modern revisers, and some recent rethinking and responses to these theorists.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 5006. Foundations in Religion, Race, and Ethnicity. 3 Credit Hours.

Critically engages leading theoretical discussions about the intersection of religion, race, and ethnicity. Serves also as a practicum in relevant social science methodologies and their application in the analysis of a chosen "ethnic" congregation in the Philadelphia area.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 5201. Foundations in Chinese Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic studies of (1) the classical texts and essential teachings of early Confucianism and Taoism, and (2) the ideological continuity from early Confucianism and Taoism to Neo-Confucianism and Neo-Taoism. Focuses on the major religious and philosophical traditions of China. Special consideration is given to the ethical, religious, and social thought of Confucianism and Daoism. Topics of discussion include: 1) the pre-Han concepts of spirits and gods, 2) classical Confucianism (the "Kung-Meng tradition"), 3) philosophical Daoism (the "Lao-Zhuang tradition"), 4) religious Daoism (including the popular cult of immortality), 5) ideological continuities and transformations in Neo-Confucianism and Neo-Daoism, and 6) religious practices in contemporary China. The approach is both historical and comparative. No knowledge of Chinese is required, as the readings are in translation.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 5701. Foundations in African Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 8006. Methodological Options in the Study of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Focuses on one of the currently available methodologies used in academic discourses on religion, enabling the students to evaluate this methodology and compare and contrast it with others.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 8011. Religion and Public Life. 3 Credit Hours.

We will inquire about key intellectual issues pertaining to the public understanding of religion in the U.S. today: examining the ideas of secular and religious; understanding the first amendment clauses on religious freedom and establishment; tracking ethical debates concerning race, gender, and sexuality; gaining perspective on civil religion and popular culture; examining how religion uses and is portrayed in the media; and gaining insight about religious pluralism in local and global contexts. Additional goals include understanding the connections among world events, American society, and religious life. Students will do critical writing in a variety of styles to address public and academic audiences.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 8012. Religion and Sexuality. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines recent ideas and trends in the scholarly literature about sexuality in the context of religious studies. We will focus primarily on how contemporary scholars have reshaped and rethought religious traditions that control and celebrate sexuality in light of contemporary ideas about the power and variety of sexual experience and expression. Students will be required to read and critically engage scholarly monographs and write an extensive original research paper on a topic of their choice.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 8201. Chinese Philosophy and Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce participants to a select few seminal works in the history of East Asian thought. These works will be read closely and in depth together with secondary scholarship on them. The primary readings will usually be from the pre-modern period and will focus on foundational works of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 8402. Violence in Ancient Religion: Pagan, Christian, and Jewish, 50 CE-500 CE. 3 Credit Hours.

Explores examples of coercion, violence, and war resulting primarily from religious motivations within the political framework of the Roman Empire. The rubrics of violence in the cause of freedom, violence due to intolerance, and violence in the cause of ideology will organize the work. The questions of how religious ideas serve the cause of power and how the victims respond in each religion will dominate the seminar. In addition, discovering whether racial or ethnic biases skewed perceptions and inspired conflicts will be important throughout. In order to do this, we must look at the new studies of contemporary scholars who explore definitions of self-identity in antiquity. Who is a "Jew," a "Greek," a "Roman," and a "barbarian"? Finally, analyzing the range of acts, from ignorant prejudice to violence sanctioned by the state through legislation, will aid in the task of situating the phenomena in antiquity within the context of contemporary theories on the problem.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 8700. Topics in African Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Covers a selected topic or topics in the study of African religions, including aome or all of the following: African traditional religions, new African religions, and forms of Christianity and other major religions as practiced and elaborated by Africans.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

REL 8702. Religions of the African Diaspora. 3 Credit Hours.

Looks at the historical development of African-derived or African-inspired religions in the African diaspora. Particular emphasis will be placed on Camdomble in Brazil, Vodou in Haiti, and Santeria in Cuba, as well as on communities practicing these and related religious traditions in the United States.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

REL 8800. Special Topics in Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

A series of special topics in the field of religion, including some of those taught by visiting faculty. Content will vary from semester to semester. Specifics will appear in department course description booklet each semester.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

REL 8810. Special Topics in Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

A series of special topics in the field of religion, including some of those taught by visiting faculty. Content will vary from semester to semester. Specifics will appear in department course description booklet each semester.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

REL 9087. Teaching Practicum in Religion Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is for students who are beginning to teach religious studies in a university setting and wish to think about and develop their teaching skills. The course will help teachers in constructing the syllabus, conducting class discussions, designing lectures, getting the most out of student evaluations, using office hours effectively, creating teaching portfolios, working as a teaching assistant, grading, and problem solving around student interactions. The class will involve classroom visits and peer critiques, practical exercises and discussion about problems as they arise, so students should enroll during a semester when they are actually engaged in teaching.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

SOC 3222. Sociology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the role of religion in constructing human realities. It emphasizes how human understandings of the world and of reality are constructed socially through collective action with religion playing a prominent role. It looks at how religion influences individual and collective action; the intersection of religion with politics and media; religion's connection to race, gender, class, and sexual orientation; and the connection between religion and science.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.