Health Policy, Ph.D.

COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH

About the Program

The Ph.D. program in Health Policy is administered by the Department of Health Services Administration and Policy. This program is unique in that it provides students with an opportunity to develop mixed methods research to investigate health policy and its impact on population health improvement, access to care, and reduction in health disparities. The program trains students in the use of qualitative and quantitative research methods using primary data collection and secondary data sets to research the development, implementation, and impact of health policy initiatives. The Ph.D. program in Health Policy also fosters the application of the methods and materials of health services and health economics research in investigating health disparities and clinical outcomes as the basis to inform health policy.

The Ph.D. in Health Policy is one of two doctoral programs offered in Public Health. The other is the Ph.D. in Social and Behavioral Health Sciences. In general, the Ph.D. programs:

  • provide training and experiences that support interdisciplinary learning,
  • promote critical and theory-based problem-solving skills to address public health problems, and
  • foster the development of public health professional values and ethics.

All students in the Ph.D. programs complete common core course requirements that include foundational courses in Bioethics, Biostatistics, Epidemiology, History of Public Health, and Theory of Health Behavior, and are introduced to critical public health research methods and statistical techniques. Beyond these core courses, students take specialized courses in their chosen subdiscipline and engage in research and scholarly productivity with faculty members. In addition to in-depth, didactic training in cross-disciplinary concepts and methods, the Ph.D. programs aim to foster in their trainees the development of a public health professional identity and values. Professional development exercises are infused in didactic courses and available in other program-sponsored activities, such as conference attendance, departmental colloquia and brown-bag presentations, journal clubs, and professional development workshops. Doctoral trainees are also encouraged to take advantage of professional development opportunities offered at various public health centers and laboratories, the College of Public Health, and Temple University, including special workshops and seminars on grant writing, methods, and teaching. Finally, students learn by working closely with faculty on research and writing papers for publications.

Time Limit for Degree Completion: 7 years

Campus Location: Main

Full-Time/Part-Time Status: Full-time study is required.

Interdisciplinary Study: Students are encouraged to develop programs of study that are interdisciplinary in nature, involving coursework across departments, schools, and colleges. Research in affiliated units is encouraged.

Affiliation(s): A number of centers and laboratories exist within the College of Public Health and Temple University that are designed to study, develop, and evaluate interventions aimed at resolving significant public health problems (e.g., ethnic and racial disparities in cancer, inadequate disaster preparedness, obesity, tobacco exposure, and violence). These centers and labs offer opportunities for research placements for doctoral students; assist them in developing papers for publication and presentation at conferences; provide professional socialization; help them to define dissertation projects using existing funded studies; and may provide some funding in the form of Research Assistantships.

Specific centers and labs include the Center for Asian Tobacco Control, the Ergonomics and Work Physiology Laboratory, the Health Behavior Research Clinic, the Risk Communication Laboratory, and the Social and Behavioral Health Intervention Laboratory. Faculty and doctoral students also are involved in research with affiliates in the Department of Nursing, Fox Chase Cancer Center, the Fox School of Business and Management, the Institute on Aging, the Institute on Disabilities, the Public Health Law Research Program, the School of Media and Communication, the Lewis Katz School of Medicine, the School of Podiatric Medicine, and Temple University Health System. Additional research opportunities at Temple University include the Institute for Survey Research, the Social Science Data Library, and the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment.

Job Prospects: Graduates of the Ph.D. programs are prepared to become faculty members or researchers in colleges and universities or to hold research-related positions in a wide range of organizations, including health foundations, health systems, pharmaceutical companies, and public health departments. The purpose of the program is to develop research and teaching competencies, so it is anticipated that most graduates will enter tenure-track faculty positions in research-focused schools of public health or health-related academic programs.

Financing Opportunities: Full-time Ph.D. students generally receive financial support through a combination of university fellowships and assistantships.

University Fellowships:
The Department of Health Services Administration and Policy nominates outstanding applicants for consideration for the following fellowship opportunities:

  • Presidential Fellowships are the most prestigious awards. Competition is reserved for only the most outstanding candidates.
  • University Fellowships are awarded to outstanding incoming graduate students. These awards are intended to support students who demonstrate outstanding potential for success in their chosen fields.
  • Future Faculty Fellowships are intended to attract outstanding students who would diversify the professoriate. Candidates are newly admitted graduate students from underrepresented groups in the applicant's discipline who show exceptional leadership and/or have overcome significant obstacles in pursuing an academic career.

University fellowships provide a stipend and tuition for two years of study. The College of Public Health then provides a graduate assistantship to cover the additional 2 years of study.

College of Public Health Graduate Assistantships:
Graduate assistantships sponsored by the College of Public Health include:

  • Research Assistants (RAs) perform supervised research activities. Research assistantships are frequently supported by faculty grant funding, and it is anticipated the RAs will work with faculty members on new and continuing grant proposals and develop both research and grant-writing competencies.
  • Teaching Assistants (TAs) may be assigned to assist in the teaching of courses, including grading examinations and papers or teaching laboratory sections. Some TAs independently teach undergraduate courses. The purpose, however, is to develop competencies in current pedagogies that prepare students for academic teaching careers.

TAs and RAs provide 20 hours of service per week. Both assistantships carry a stipend and typically tuition remission for up to 9 credits per term. Consideration for admission with an assistantship requires a  description of research and teaching experience; statement of research and teaching goals; identification of areas of interest, including identification of potential faculty mentors and articulation of career goals consistent with the mission and purpose of the Health Policy Ph.D. program. Offers of admission will generally be accompanied by a fellowship or assistantship offer. Students with full finding from another source (e.g. government funding) will be given full consideration in the admission process. Self-funding is highly discouraged.

Information regarding funding opportunities at Temple can be found at http://www.temple.edu/grad/finances/index.htm.

Admission Requirements and Deadlines

Application Deadline:

Fall: January 2

All applicants to the Health Policy Ph.D. program must apply via the Centralized Application Service for Public Health (SOPHAS). The system can be accessed at https://portal.sophas.org/. A supplemental application is also required to be submitted directly to Temple University at http://www.temple.edu/apply/common/appcheck.asp.

All application materials must be received by the deadline in order to be reviewed by the Ph.D. Admissions Committee. Admission is competitive, and students are admitted only once a year. Applications are evaluated together after the deadline has passed. Applications that are completed after the deadline are held for review the following year. An important component of the admissions decision is the fit between the applicant's goals, experiences, and interests and the expertise of the faculty in the Ph.D. program.

Letters of Reference:
Number Required: 3

From Whom: Letters of recommendation should be obtained from evaluators who can provide insight into the applicant's academic abilities and talents, as well as comment on the applicant's aptitude for doctoral-level study and research. Recommendations from college/university faculty members are preferred.

Coursework Required for Admission Consideration: Applicants are expected to have completed coursework in the natural, social, or behavioral sciences related to health. A course in statistics and research methods is also desirable. The following prerequisites, which do not count toward the Ph.D., must also be satisfied, either through the College of Public Health's graduate certificate in Public Health, by an M.P.H. degree, or through course equivalency:

ENVH 5103Environmental Health3
EPBI 5002Biostatistics3
EPBI 5101Fundamentals of Epidemiology3
HPM 5006Political and Economic Aspects of Health3
or HPM 8003 Political-Economic Aspects of Public Health
SBS 5102Theoretical Foundations of Health Behavior3

Master's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: Nearly all students admitted to the program have a master’s degree. Although a master's degree specifically in Public Health is not required, preference is given to applicants who have a background in the health sciences, including behavioral medicine, environmental health, epidemiology, health communication, health psychology, medicine, or a public health discipline. 

Bachelor's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A baccalaureate degree is required, although it need not be in Public Health. Preference is given to applicants who have a background in the health sciences, including behavioral medicine, environmental health, epidemiology, health communication, health psychology, medicine, or a public health discipline. 

Statement of Goals: In no more than 750 words:

  • identify Health Policy (HP) as the program for which you wish to be considered and why;
  • describe important academic and research achievements and interests; and
  • specify how your research interests relate to your ultimate career goals and to ongoing work by faculty members affiliated with the HP Ph.D. program.

The match between faculty and student interests is important in the admissions decision. Be sure to articulate clearly the linkages among your training goals, the expertise of our faculty, and the training emphasis of the Ph.D. program. For a description of faculty interests, visit https://cph.temple.edu/healthadminpolicy/about/faculty.

Standardized Test Scores:
GRE: Required. The median score of recently admitted applicants is 550 (old test) or 156 (new test) verbal and 620 (old test) or 149 (new test) quantitative.

TOEFL (international applicants only): 79 iBT or 550 PBT minimum.

Resume: Current curriculum vitae required.

Writing Sample: Scholarly articles, technical reports, or academic professional papers are desirable. Unless it is a published work, the writing sample should be no more than 10 pages.

Advanced Standing: A student enrolled in the Health Policy Ph.D. program may apply for advanced standing credits for graduate coursework graded "B" or better from an accredited institution. Credits for courses taken as part of a master's degree are considered; credits for thesis, fieldwork, clinical practice, or directed projects/readings cannot be used for advanced standing credit. To be approved for advanced standing, the courses must be deemed appropriate as part of the student’s training in the Health Policy Ph.D. program. The maximum number of advanced standing credits awarded is 30.

Program Requirements

General Program Requirements:
Total Number of Credits Required: 45 (some of which may be in the form of Advanced Standing credit, as determined after matriculation)

Required Courses:

College Core Course
HRPR 5001Current and Emerging Issues in Public Health and Health Professions 10
Health Policy Theory Courses
HPM 8005Theor Hlth Policy Making3
HPM 8008Health Economics3
HPM 8014Comparative Health Policy3
HPM 8015Public Health Policy and Legal Issues3
Research Methods Courses
EPBI 8012Multivariate Biostatistics3
EPBI 8212Grantsmanship in Health Research3
HPM 8013Research Methods in Health Policy3
Electives 218
Select electives in Research Methods:
Structural Equation Modeling
Multilev Mod in Int Res
Data Management and Analysis
Qualitative Research Methods
Research in State Politics
Research Methods in Public Health
Econometric Methods for Health Services Research course
Select electives in Health Policy Theory:
Seminar in Current Issues in Public Health
HPM 8007
HPM 8306
Legislative Behavior
Non-Didactic Courses 3
HPM 9994Preliminary Examinations1
HPM 9998Dissertation Proposal Research2
HPM 9999Dissertation Research3
Total Credit Hours45
1

This common College Core course is required of all incoming graduate students in the College of Public Health. It is available completely online and designed such that students can complete the modules at their own pace over the course of their degree program.

2

Other electives may be selected with the approval of a faculty advisor.

3

The Graduate School requires that students complete a minimum of 6 credits, including HPM 9994, HPM 9998, and HPM 9999. Of the 6 credits, at least 2 credits must be earned at the dissertation phase in HPM 9999.

Culminating Events:
Area Paper:
Prior to sitting for the preliminary examinations, students must write a published or publishable paper in their chosen area. The purpose of the paper requirement is to demonstrate critical and interpretive knowledge in specialized areas of one's chosen program, as well as a high proficiency in written communication and a capacity to contribute to generalizable knowledge in the field. The paper can be written in one of a variety of formats, including a systematic review, an empirical paper, or a theoretical piece relevant to the field. The student must be the lead or sole author.

The Director of Graduate Studies determines if the published paper meets the writing requirement. If a student is not submitting a first-authored, peer-reviewed, and published (or in press) article, two faculty reviewers review the paper to assess whether it is of publishable quality. The second reader may not be the student’s advisor. The review is similar to a peer review of a journal article and evaluated as either passing or failing the writing requirement. Students who fail the paper requirement are allowed to submit a revision. The evaluators set a reasonable timeline for doing so, usually within one term.

A student cannot advance to the preliminary examinations without passing the paper requirement. Failure to satisfactorily complete the area paper requirement within the specified time frame can result in dismissal from the Ph.D. program. Students who are entering the Ph.D. program and have already published a peer-reviewed paper related to their programmatic subdiscipline can request to waive this requirement by completing a waiver application and submitting it along with the published document to the Director of Graduate Studies.

Preliminary Examinations (HPM 9994):
After completing the paper requirement, all students are required to take the preliminary examinations prior to defending their dissertation research proposal. The preliminary examinations cover all of the core components of the students’ training, including the specific program. The exams should be taken within one term of completing all coursework. The student must register for 1 credit of HPM 9994 in the term in which the examinations are taken. To register for HPM 9994, the student must have completed all coursework or be enrolled in final courses in the term in which the examinations are taken. The examinations cannot be taken until all Incomplete and/or "NR" grades are removed and the area paper requirement has been satisfied. Students are required to meet with their advisor and Director of Graduate Studies before the beginning of the term in which they plan to take the examinations to establish eligibility. Special authorization is required to register.

The preliminary examinations consist of the following components:

  • Core exam, which is a one-week take-home written examination on the history, bioethics, and scientific foundations of Public Health, with an emphasis on the student’s concentration.
  • Methods exam, which is a four-hour in-class examination on research methods and statistics.
  • Oral exam, which is a two-hour oral examination by a panel of three faculty members on any areas covered in the three written examinations, the area paper, and the students’ concentration.

Students who fail the written examination do not proceed to the oral examination. They may have one opportunity to take the examination again. A second failure results in automatic dismissal from the Ph.D. program.

Dissertation Proposal (HPM 9998):
After passing the preliminary examinations, students may enroll in HPM 9998. Students must be enrolled for 1 credit of HPM 9998 each term until they file their dissertation proposal with the Graduate School.

All students must form a Doctoral Advisory Committee (DAC) with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies. The DAC is composed of at least three Graduate Faculty members: two members, including the chair, must be from the Ph.D. program faculty of the relevant department. The DAC Chair must be approved as Doctoral Graduate Faculty by the Dean of the College of Public Health and by the Graduate School. The chair is responsible for overseeing and guiding the student's progress; coordinating the responses of the Committee members; and informing the student and the Director of Graduate Studies annually of the student's academic progress. A fourth, external reader is also required at the time of the final dissertation defense. This person must be a member of the Graduate Faculty at Temple or approved by the Dean of the College to take part in the final dissertation examination. This fourth member is not required to be present at the defense of the proposal.

To fulfill the requirements of HPM 9998, students must submit a dissertation proposal, successfully defend it orally before their Committee, apply for IRB approval for the proposed research, and submit the proposal to the Graduate School. Students have a maximum of one year from the time of completing their preliminary examinations to develop and defend their dissertation proposal. Thus, students may enroll in HPM 9998 for only two terms without permission. Students needing more time may, with the support of their advisor, formally petition the Director of Graduate Studies for an extension, although an extension is not guaranteed. Failure to meet these requirements can result in dismissal from the program.

Once the proposal is defended, the student is elevated to candidacy and eligible to register for dissertation credits.

Dissertation (HPM 9999):
The doctoral dissertation is an original theory-based research study that makes a significant contribution to the field of Public Health. It should expand existing knowledge and demonstrate the student's mastery of theory and research methods, particularly within a concentration or specialty area. The research should be rigorous, while upholding the ethics and standards of the field. It is expected that the study will result in publication and presentation to professional audiences.

To fulfill the dissertation requirement, students must prepare and orally defend the final dissertation in a public meeting. Students should present their plans for publishing their dissertation as part of their defense. Students must be enrolled continuously for at least 3 credits of dissertation research until their dissertation is successfully defended. The Graduate School requires a minimum of 2 credits of HPM 9999. Students must be enrolled in the term that they graduate.

The Dissertation Examining Committee (DEC) consists of the DAC plus at least one additional external reviewer. The external reviewer must be doctorally prepared. If this person is not a member of the Temple University Graduate Faculty, s/he must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies, the Dean of the College, and the Graduate School to take part in the final dissertation examination. The DEC evaluates the student’s written dissertation and oral defense, including the student’s ability to articulate orally the research question; methodological approach; primary findings; interpretation of the findings; and implications for theory, research, and practice. The DEC votes to pass or fail the dissertation and the defense at the conclusion of the public presentation.

If a student needs to change a member of a committee, the new member must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies and registered with the Graduate School.

Students who are preparing to defend their dissertation should confirm a time and date with their DEC and work with their department’s administrative assistant to secure a room. This should be done at least one month in advance of the proposed date. The Administrative Assistant arranges the time, date, and room within two working days. After the time, date, and room are secured, the student must send to the Graduate School a completed "Announcement of Dissertation Defense" form, found at http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/. This must be submitted at least 10 working days before the defense. The department posts flyers announcing the defense, and the Graduate School lists the defense on its website.

Courses

HPM 5005. International Health Studies Abroad. 6 Credit Hours.

Students learn to articulate a historical and cultural understanding of the Costa Rican approach to health and medical care, to identify the major health concerns of the Costa Rican population in rural and urban settings and the major strides taken to improve health, to conduct limited fieldwork with rural communities in teams of 3 to 4 persons or conduct community health field research among the graduate students, and to write a professional paper and presentation on one of the health issues in Costa Rica based on their experience there. While previous Spanish language proficiency is not required, some Spanish language ability is essential for students to gain the maximum understanding during the program. Therefore, students during the first two weeks of the program take intensive Spanish language training in Costa Rica at the Institute for Central American Development Studies (ICADS). The third week involves travel to other regions within Costa Rica to examine different health conditions depending on the year's topics. During the fourth and fifth weeks, students live and work in rural communities and help to facilitate health education workshops on different activities such as: diabetes, nutrition, HIV/AIDS prevention education, women's health, child health care issues, first aid education, fitness and exercise, and backyard gardening.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 5006. Political and Economic Aspects of Health. 3 Credit Hours.

The course provides an introduction to the structure and delivery of healthcare in the United States, as well as an introduction to health policymaking. In addition to required reading materials, students will be asked to examine current health policies at the local, state, and/or national level.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 5007. Principles of Emergency Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and models of public health preparedness and response for all hazards emergency management. It will enable health care and allied health professionals, public health professionals, and emergency responders to work together to plan and respond effectively to both natural and man made disasters. The course will introduce students to the identified core competencies of emergency health preparedness for public health professionals, which include functional roles, communication, resource identification, problem-solving, and evaluation. The issues of mental health and special populations will be introduced in an emergency management context. Students will utilize problem-based learning by analyzing actual disaster events and applying the theories, principles, and practice of preparedness, response, mitigation, and recovery.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 5014. Leadership and Management in Non-Profit Organizations. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers leadership and management in public health practice. The course will review leadership styles, moving through the "leadership pipeline" to help students understand the basic underpinnings of leadership. Within that context, the course will explore the essentials of applying strong leadership practices in public health organizations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 5016. Public Health Advocacy. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to prepare future public health practitioners with substantive knowledge on how policy is crafted and how to effectively integrate public health science in the policy process, and to provide practical skills on engaging policymakers and public constituencies to support public health initiatives. It will combine policy/advocacy strategy, real-life case studies, lectures by policymakers, and strategic analysis of recent legislative developments in health care. Reading assignments provide background knowledge for class lectures and discussion.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 5105. Seminar in Maternal and Child Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar focuses on social, economic, and political issues in maternal and child health (MCH) policies from the national to agency levels. Students undertake an analysis of a MCH issue using a policy analysis framework developed throughout the seminar. Included are definitions of MCH, the organization and funding of services, literacy and cultural issues and the evidence base for policies and programs.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 5107. Forced Migration and Refugee Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course uses case studies and research literature to examine the multifaceted causes of complex emergencies and their subsequent impacts on the health of the population, including populations that stay in place, that are internally displaced (IPD), and population movement that crosses international borders (refugees). The policies and practices of the humanitarian response among both governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and their impact on population health will be explored. A framework for three issues that effect population health in complex emergencies will be provided and their consequences and possible interventions iterated. These issues are mental health, gender based violence, and nutrition. Assessment, program implementation, and evaluation will be looked at in the context of the particular barriers and issues found in complex emergency situations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 5111. Community Outreach in Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and models of strategic community outreach as it pertains to the special population communities, within the context of emergency management planning, response, and recovery. It will assist health care and allied health professionals, public health professionals, and emergency responders to understand how accessible information and technology is part of the community outreach strategy. Students will utilize problem-based learning by analyzing actual and scenario-based disaster events and applying the theories, principles, and practices of strategic community outreach pertaining to emergency response and recovery. In addition, students will learn about the issues faced by special population communities and how to address these special needs in all hazard response and recovery.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 5500. Seminar in Current Issues in Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminar topics rotate to address current issues in public health research, policy and practice.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: College of Public Health, Social Work

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HPM 8002. Research Seminar in Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a research seminar on linkages between theory and research in social and behavioral health studies. It is required for Ph.D. students prior to taking the preliminary examinations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 8003. Political-Economic Aspects of Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of the political and economic aspects of public health systems, practice, research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 8005. Theor Hlth Policy Making. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the primary theoretical frameworks for the development of policy, from agenda setting through decision-making and implementation. In addition to reviewing the theoretical foundations of policymaking, the course will apply the theories to current health policy issues.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 8008. Health Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This class will promote the understanding of core health economics theory, using research literature and case studies to examine how economic theory has shaped the development and understanding of the healthcare systems and policies in the U.S. A background in economic theory will help students to understand and interpret research based on those theories. Health Economics is intended to promote an understanding of how these theories fit into the formation and changes in our healthcare structure. It will also offer an economic perspective on health behavior, such as how discounting relates to risk behavior and how risk preference relates to insurance purchase.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 8013. Research Methods in Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce and engage students in research methods used in health policy research, including both the development of policies and the evaluation of existing policies. The course will cover both qualitative methods such as policy analysis, interviewing, focus groups and content analysis, as well as quantitative methods such as legal mapping studies, secondary data analysis, and some economic evaluations. The course will explain and engage these methodologies, but students are not expected to carry out statistical analysis. Lastly, the course will require students to think about the results generated in such research and effective ways in which to communicate such findings to the appropriate audience. The course is intended for students who will be working on policy research or social science research that may include a policy component. Learning objectives will be met through didactic lecture, a formal policy analysis paper, individual homework assignments, and a final exam.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 8014. Comparative Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Approaches to public health policy are informed and influenced by evidence and experience from across the nation and around the globe. Students will be challenged to think about the social, cultural, political and economic challenges of engaging public health policy to advance population health in an international context.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
HPM 5006|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 5006|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently.

HPM 8015. Public Health Policy and Legal Issues. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce public health students to the basic legal principles underlying public health policy and the mechanisms to achieve policy change. The law is a powerful tool to support public health, but government must act within the confines of the Constitution and balance competing rights of individuals and the broader community. The course will explore these relationships in historical and present contexts and examine the differences among federal, state, and local governments' authority to enact public health policy. Students will be able to identify the legal issues that arise when government attempts to regulate risky behavior by individuals or the conduct of companies that produce and market products that create such risks (e.g., tobacco, firearms, and alcohol). The course will evaluate why the law is not uniform depending on the product government seeks to regulate (e.g., food vs. vaccines) and how litigation can effectively change this legal landscape. Any student interested in policy should be familiar with basic legal rules and current debates in regulation and control; this class will provide such insight and equip students to work in any type of policy or advocacy setting.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
HPM 5006|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 5006|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently
OR HPM 8003|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PBHL 8003|Minimum Grade of B-|May not be taken concurrently.

HPM 8112. Public Health Program Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours.

The course concerns research methods and techniques used to evaluate public health programs. Students develop an evaluation design, including defined evaluation questions, study design, specific measures and methods, and human subjects protocols.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 9083. Readings and Conference in Public Health. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

This is an advanced tutorial in public health with an appropriate faculty member. Note: Registration requires a written contract with the supervising faculty member and approval of the student's advisor and of the Director of Graduate Programs.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HPM 9189. MPH Capstone Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar is required of M.P.H. students during final year of study. The seminar includes integration of coursework and practice skills to develop a fieldwork project or internship in a public health agency.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HPM 9289. MPH Fieldwork I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course entails a fieldwork project or internship in a public health agency. It includes seminars, oral and written reports of progress, and joint supervision by a preceptor and faculty member.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 9389. MPH Fieldwork II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an evaluation of the fieldwork project or internship using a full range of research methodologies. Data are collected, analyzed, and reported in a comprehensive final report. Oral and/or poster presentations are presented to public health organizations. The course includes a final oral defense of the project or internship.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

HPM 9991. Independent Project in Environmental Health. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Under the direction of an appropriate graduate faculty member, students tie together their coursework in a project that poses a problem, gathers data to help analyze the problem, and provides a solution. Note: Enrollment must be approved by the student's advisor and the Director of Graduate Programs.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HPM 9994. Preliminary Examinations. 1 Credit Hour.

This course supports preparation for taking the preliminary examinations in the Health Policy and Socila and Behavioral Sciencs PhD. programs. To enroll, students must have completed all required coursework for the Ph.D. and obtain the approval of the Ph.D. Program Director. Students must be enrolled to take the required preliminary examinations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HPM 9996. Masters Res in Pub Hlth. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is limited to students who have chosen to fulfill the master's degree by writing a thesis.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HPM 9998. Dissertation Proposal Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course supports preparation of the dissertation proposal. The course is required for students who have passed the preliminary examinations for their programs and who have not yet defended the dissertation proposal.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

HPM 9999. Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

This course is limited to Ph.D. candidates who have completed and defended a dissertation proposal that is filed with the Graduate School by the last day to add a course in the semester. Continuous registration in 9999 fall and spring is required until the dissertation is successfully defended.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
Student Attribute restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: Dissertation Writing Student

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

Contacts

Program Web Address:

https://cph.temple.edu/healthadminpolicy/programs-offered/graduate/health-policy-phd

Department Information:

Dept. of Health Services Administration and Policy

Ritter Hall Annex, 9th Floor (004-09)

1301 Cecil B. Moore Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19122-6005

publichealth@temple.edu

215-204-8726

Submission Address for Application Materials:

https://portal.sophas.org/

Department Contacts:

Admissions:

Joyce Hankins-Radford

joyce.hankins@temple.edu

215-204-7213

Graduate Program Director:

William Aaronson, Ph.D.

aaronson@temple.edu

215-204-8128

Chairperson:

William Aaronson, Ph.D.

aaronson@temple.edu

215-204-8128