Political Science (POLS)

Courses

POLS 0825. Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences. 4 Credit Hours.

Psychological, political, social, and economic arguments and knowledge frequently depend on the use of numerical data. A psychologist might hypothesize that I.Q. is attributable to environmental or genetic factors; a politician might claim that hand gun control legislation will reduce crime; a sociologist might assert that social mobility is more limited in the United States than in other countries, and an economist might declare that globalization lowers the incomes of U.S. workers. How can we evaluate these arguments? Using examples from psychology, sociology, political science, and economics, students will examine how social science methods and statistics help us understand the social world. The goal is to become critical consumers of quantitative material that appears in scholarship, the media, and everyday life. NOTE: This course fulfills the Quantitative Literacy (GQ) requirement for students under GenEd and a Quantitative Reasoning (QA or QB) requirement for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed ANTH 0825, PSY 0825, or SOC 0825/0925.

Course Attributes: GQ

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
MATH 0701|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC4 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC5 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6 Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC3A Y|May not be taken concurrently
OR MC6A Y|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 0829. The History & Significance of Race in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Why were relations between Native Americans and whites violent almost from the beginning of European settlement? How could slavery thrive in a society founded on the principle that "all men are created equal"? How comparable were the experiences of Irish, Jewish, and Italian immigrants, and why did people in the early 20th century think of them as separate "races"? What were the causes and consequences of Japanese Americans' internment in military camps during World War II? Are today's Mexican immigrants unique, or do they have something in common with earlier immigrants? Using a variety of written sources and outstanding documentaries, this course examines the racial diversity of America and its enduring consequences. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: African American Studies 0829, Africology and African American Studies 0829, Anthropology 0829, Geography and Urban Studies 0829, History 0829, Political Science 0829, Sociology 0829, 0929, 1376, 1396, R059, or X059.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0832. Politics of Identity in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Gay or straight. Black or white. Male or female. What do these different group identities mean to Americans? How do they influence our politics? Should we celebrate or downplay our diversity? This course explores how we think about others and ourselves as members of different groups and what consequences it has for how we treat one another. Our fundamental social identities can be a source of power or of powerlessness, a justification for inequality or for bold social reform. Students learn about the importance of race, class, gender and sexual orientation across a variety of important contexts, such as the family, workplace, schools, and popular culture and the implications these identities have on our daily lives. NOTE: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies 0832/0932, History 0832, Sociology 0832 or Women's Studies 0832/0932.

Course Attributes: GD

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0859. The Making of American Society: Melting Pot or Culture Wars?. 3 Credit Hours.

Terrorism, illegal immigration, gay marriage, religious conflict, political in-fighting, corporate corruption, racial animosities, civil liberties assaults, media conglomeration, Wal-Mart goes to China and the rich get richer. America in the 21st century is a contentious society. How did we get to this place in time? Examine what makes American society distinctive from other advanced industrial democracies as we study the philosophical origins of America, the development of social and economic relationships over time, and the political disputes dominating contemporary American life. The course relies heavily on perspectives from History, Sociology and Political Science to explain the challenges facing contemporary American society. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: AMST 0859, History 0859, PHIL 0859, or SOC 0859.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0862. Development & Globalization. 3 Credit Hours.

Use historical and case study methods to study the differences between rich and poor nations and the varied strategies available for development in a globalizing world. Examine the challenges facing developing countries in historical and contemporary context and analyze the main social, cultural, and political factors that interact with the dynamic forces of the world economy. These include imperialism/colonialism, state formation, labor migration, demographic trends, gender issues in development, religious movements and nationalism, the challenges to national sovereignty, waves of democratization, culture and mass media, struggles for human rights, environmental sustainability, the advantages and disadvantages of globalization, and movements of resistance. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: History 0862, GUS 0862, POLS 0962, or SOC 0862/0962.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0864. War and Peace. 3 Credit Hours.

Total war, weapons of mass destruction, genocide. These were not solely inventions of the 20th century nor are they the natural consequences of a violent human nature. Leaders, armies, and the strategies they pursue are rooted in their social and political context. Weapons are the products of not merely technological but also historical and cultural development. Battles occur on a political and historical terrain. Learn how ancient ideology, medieval technology, modern propaganda, and more have changed how humans wage war and make peace. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed History 0864/0964.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0866. World Affairs. 3 Credit Hours.

We live in a global age when events beyond our borders significantly affect our lives. Sharpen your understanding of international developments, including wars, economic globalization, wealth and poverty, the spread of democracy, environmental degradation, and global pandemics. This course offers an introduction to the study of world affairs that gives you the conceptual tools to deepen your understanding of how major historical and current trends in the world affect your life and that of others around the globe. Readings include historical documents, classic texts in the study of international relations, and current perspectives on the state of the world from multiple disciplinary perspectives. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: History 0866, GUS 0866 or POLS 0966.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0868. World Society in Literature and Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Political Science 0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0962. Honors Fate, Hope, and Action: Globalization Today. 3 Credit Hours.

Use historical and case study methods to study the differences between rich and poor nations and the varied strategies available for development in a globalizing world. Examine the challenges facing developing countries in historical and contemporary context and analyze the main social, cultural, and political factors that interact with the dynamic forces of the world economy. These include imperialism/colonialism, state formation, labor migration, demographic trends, gender issues in development, religious movements and nationalism, the challenges to national sovereignty, waves of democratization, culture and mass media, struggles for human rights, environmental sustainability, the advantages and disadvantages of globalization, and movements of resistance. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: SOC 0862/0962, History 0862, POLS 0862, or GUS 0862.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0966. Honors World Affairs. 3 Credit Hours.

We live in a global age when events beyond our borders significantly affect our lives. Sharpen your understanding of international developments, including wars, economic globalization, wealth and poverty, the spread of democracy, environmental degradation, and global pandemics. This course offers an introduction to the study of world affairs that gives you the conceptual tools to deepen your understanding of how major historical and current trends in the world affect your life and that of others around the globe. Readings include historical documents, classic texts in the study of international relations, and current perspectives on the state of the world from multiple disciplinary perspectives. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: GUS 0866, History 0866 or POLS 0866.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 0968. Honors World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Political Science 0868, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1009. Discovering Political Science. 1 Credit Hour.

The course is designed to introduce students to the discipline, career opportunities, and the faculty in the political science department. In addition, the course will acquaint students with related social science departments and the University. NOTE: The course meets twice a week for one-half of the semester. This is a one-credit course for students considering Political Science as a major and for Political Science majors.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1101. The American Political System. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to American politics. Focuses on the values, institutions, and processes of politics and government in the United States. Introduces the concepts and techniques of political science. NOTE: (1) This course is required of all Political Science majors. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1102. American Political System. 1 Credit Hour.

An introduction to American politics. Focuses on the values, institutions, and processes of politics and government in the United States.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1103. The Individual, Race, and American Political Life. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the relationships between individuals and their government in the United States, investigating how government has handled the issue of insuring individual equality under democracy. It will explore the ways in which the exclusion and incorporation of various groups in American society have been affected by race and class. NOTE: (1) Political Science majors should consult with an advisor about enrolling in this course. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race and Individual & Society (RN) requirements. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1201. Foreign Governments and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers the values, institutions and processes of politics and government in selected developing and developed countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. NOTE: (1) For both non-majors and majors. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1301. International Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the nature of the international system, the determinants and instruments of foreign policy, and the problems of international conflict and cooperation. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1911. Honors Introduction to American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to American politics. Focuses on the values, institutions, and processes of politics and government in the United States. Introduces the concepts and techniques of political science. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: AC, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1921. Honors Foreign Governments and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers the values, institutions and processes of politics and government in selected developing and developed countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. NOTE: (1) For both non-majors and majors. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1931. Honors International Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the nature of the international system, the determinants and instruments of foreign policy, and the problems of international conflict and cooperation. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 1996. Honors Introduction to Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors seminar focusing on an introduction to the ideas and arguments of several political philosophers, such as Aristotle, Plato, Hobbes, and Marx, as well as an exploration of how such ideas relate to the contemporary world.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2000. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester. Please check with the faculty advisor for a course description and topic.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 2101. American Federalism. 3 Credit Hours.

Federalism in its modern form is perhaps the single most important theoretical contribution the American system of government has made to the history of political thought. This course will examine this concept, its manifestation, and the effect this federal practice has had on the American political system.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2102. American State and Local Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers government and politics of subnational units including states, counties, cities, towns, and townships in urban, suburban, and rural areas. Further topics include the relationship of state and local policy to citizens, other governmental units, and the American political system.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2103. U.S. Public Policy Making. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines selected policy areas in a variety of national settings and the relationship of political cultures and policymaking structures to policy outputs.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2107. Capital Internship Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a required course for students accepted into the Pennsylvania Capital Semester program. Class lectures and readings will focus on the larger private and governmental context for organizations where interns are placed, specifically the interaction between the state executive branch; legislature and the legislative process; news media, nonprofits, advocacy organizations, lobbying or trade associations; and local economic development organizations. Guest lecturers, who are experts in their fields, will be invited to speak on course topics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 2108. Local Government and Community Advocacy. 3 Credit Hours.

Philadelphia is utilized as a case study to understand the nature of government and community advocacy and conflict. The class opens with an introduction to the different issues of local government, transitions to a discussion of the organization of Philadelphia local government and its politics, and ends with an analysis of the legislative and budget processes. At the conclusion of the semester, students will engage in an active learning project that illustrates Philadelphia’s public policy process.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2140. Special Topics in Urban Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Specific topics rotate from semester to semester. See Political Science faculty advisor (and notation on the Course Schedule) for specific information.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 2201. Comparative Politics: Developing Nations. 3 Credit Hours.

This course describes and analyzes political patterns in the Third World. It provides a descriptive overview, analyzes domestic political trends within the context of the global system, and reviews current trends.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2202. Power and the Poet. 3 Credit Hours.

Students read short stories and poetry written by dissident authors in the Soviet period and the post-Soviet period to understand the social and political context of authoritarianism and post-authoritarian cultural control, dissent, and the power of literature. Many of the works on the reading list were never published officially in the Soviet Union, but rather were works published in samizdat (unofficial or underground publication) or tamizdat (published abroad and smuggled back into the USSR). The course ends with the reading of a contemporary Russian novel for which the author was put on trial in 2004. Students also read some background on the historical, political, social and economic context of Soviet literature.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2211. Contemporary Politics of Europe. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the institutions established in West European nations intended to preserve social stability, produce economic prosperity, and guarantee democracy, asking whether these goals are complementary or contradictory. A country-by-country examination of post-war political development in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, and Sweden. Emphasis on the political problems of the present. Accordingly, the course closes with an examination of the European integration process and the sweeping changes of East Europe affecting all of Europe.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2212. Eastern Europe, Russia and the West. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the relationships between western nations and the changing politics of Eastern European nations.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2231. Comparative Political Systems in Latin America. 3 Credit Hours.

A comparative consideration of selected Latin American political systems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2255. Comparative Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

The seminar will focus on the factors that explain political outcomes and their consequences in comparative perspective. Three basic issues we explore are: 1) How do policies differ?; 2) Why do policies differ?; and 3) What impact do the different policies have? Scholars have divergent views regarding which factors account for different policies and analyses of their impact is regularly colored by ideological position that may or may not have anything to do with the real policy goals. The topics that we will study include: What is the role of political leaders during transitions to democracy or during the passage of difficult legislation in democratic polities? Under what circumstances can a corrupt polity be prosperous and an honest one poor? Is there a relationship between religion and a country's economic success? Are diamonds and oil a blessing or a curse for a country's economy? Why did some mature economies respond differently to the global financial crisis of 2007-2009? Some of the countries we will be studying include: Chile, England, France, Spain, Singapore, United States, and Venezuela.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2301. Theories of War and Peace. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the problem of war and peace from both empirical and theoretical perspectives. Sources of war and peace studied include: the balance of power, deterrence, arms races, misperception, hegemony, nationalism, international institutions, democracy, law, and economic interdependence.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 2311. Post-Cold War Security. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the debate over the changing meaning of security and the contemporary international security environment. Topics include: the nature of security, the international environment, postmodern terrorism, information warfare, global economic instability, the persistence of American hegemony, quasi-states, and the possible demise of the nation-state.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 2314. Politics of International Law. 3 Credit Hours.

Formerly known as POLS 3396, International Legal Order. Students who have received credit for POLS 3396 will not earn additional credits for this course.

The historical development of international law in its relation to the evolution of the world political system, with analysis of issues of the contemporary world order such as warfare, political and economic development, human rights, and the environment.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2321. Politics of the Global Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course studies competing explanations for the evolution and operations of the international political economy from the origins of the industrial era in the late 18th century through the "information economy" of the 21st. It focuses on four functional areas: international trade in goods and services, the management of currency exchange and international monetary policy, the pattern and flow of investment capital, and the pattern and structure of global production.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 2331. International Organization. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers the development and current roles of regional and universal international organizations with an emphasis on the United Nations. The major international conflicts of recent decades in the organizational context will also be examined.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 2341. U.S. Foreign Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of U.S. foreign policy from three perspectives: (1) competing explanations for patterns, tendencies and events in U.S. foreign policy; (2) history of U.S. foreign policy from independence to the end of the Cold War, (3) issues in contemporary U.S. foreign policy in light of the first and second-hand perspectives.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 2351. Japan and the Changing World Order. 3 Credit Hours.

This course looks at Japanese politics from a variety of perspectives within the comparative framework of other nations and their political development within a changing global order.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2431. Modern Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Close study of works by one or more modern political philosophers, stressing their relevance to an understanding of contemporary politics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2432. American Political Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines significant political ideas from the American colonial period to the present and the influences of these ideas on contemporary American political institutions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2441. Democracy, Capitalism, and Socialism. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of some of the major political ideologies dominant in the 20th century and of the tensions and points of convergence between and among them.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2496. Introduction to Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Reading of selected works by several classical and modern political philosophers, such as Aristotle, Hobbes, and Marx; study of their relevance to contemporary political issues. NOTE: Capstone writing course in the major.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 2503. Evidence and Knowledge. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts that underlie the evaluation of empirical evidence. The focus will be on the design of research, rather than the analysis of data. Major themes covered in the course include: measurement, causality, uncertainty, the scientific method, and the methodological debates that animate political science research.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1911|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1921|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 2996. Honors: Introduction to Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors seminar focusing on an introduction to the ideas and arguments of several political philosophers, such as Aristotle, Plato, Hobbes, and Marx, as well as an exploration of how such ideas relate to the contemporary world.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3082. Independent Study. 3 Credit Hours.

Students must make arrangements to work with a political science faculty member, and seek the approval of the undergraduate chair before enrolling under this course number.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 3101. The American Presidency. 3 Credit Hours.

The role of the chief executive, the American presidency, in the political process.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3102. The Legislative Process. 3 Credit Hours.

Covers the legislative process of both the U.S. Congress and state legislatures. Includes the lawmaking process, legislative organization, leadership and policymaking, lobbying and elections, and the careers and characteristics of legislators.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3103. The American Supreme Court. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of judicial decision making and the interrelationships between the Court and other aspects of the political process.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3105. American Party System. 3 Credit Hours.

The evolution and organization of political parties in the United States, including nominating systems, campaigns, election laws, types of ballots, and electoral reform techniques.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3107. State Politics and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the American states from a comparative and historical perspective. The role of the states in relation to the federal government will also be an important theme. The class will consider the central institutions of the states, including governors, legislatures and courts, as well as political parties, interest groups and the media. The course will also focus on several areas of public policy in which the states play a pivotal role.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 3111. Media and the Political Process. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers the relationship between the mass media and American politics, government regulation of the mass media, media coverage of public affairs, political effects of entertainment programming, and the uses and influence of the media in the election process. Both print and broadcast media will be considered.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3112. American Public Opinion. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics for study include: development of public opinion and political ideology in the U.S.; the social psychology of political attitudes; the role of the mass media and the news in the formation of political opinion; and the influence of public opinion upon government policy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3113. Campaigns, Elections, and the Media. 3 Credit Hours.

Role of elections in contemporary American society. Special attention to parties and mass media as participants in campaigns and to factors affecting voting behavior of the mass public and the linkages voting provides between the public and policy formation.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3121. American Constitutional Principles I. 3 Credit Hours.

Constitutional bases of American system of government as interpreted primarily by reading and analyzing Supreme Court opinions and understanding them in their political, economic, and historic context. Course focuses largely on how constitutional meaning is determined, and judicial development of national powers of judicial review, the power to regulate commerce, separation of powers, federalism, taxation, powers of the President, and foreign affairs and war powers.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 3122. Constitutional Interpretation. 3 Credit Hours.

Focusing primarily on the U.S. Constitution, this course asks what a constitution is, and considers the various ways in which constitutions are interpreted, the historical development of interpretive practices and the broader political and historical contexts in which such practices arise and are applied and contested. It particularly examines "strict construction," "judicial activism," originalism, textualism, and various "living constitution" approaches, and examines and applies qualitative data analysis to select original sources.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(POLS 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (POLS 3103|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 3121|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 3123|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PHIL 3243|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

POLS 3123. American Constitutional Principles II: Civil Rights in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Civil rights in America, including the Constitutional protections of freedom of speech, press, assembly, and religion.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3124. Politics, Rights and Sexual Orientation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the emergence and development of the movement to secure rights for gays, lesbians and bisexuals; how gays, lesbians and bisexuals are socially constructed and the influence this has on political discourse; how political issues that are relevant to the lives of gays and lesbians reach the political agenda; and the patterns of conflict and cooperation that exist among actors in and outside of government over issues such as employment discrimination, marriage, child adoption, and military service.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3125. Interest Group Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Over the past 30 years, the system of interest group representation in Washington has witnessed a rapid expansion. Conventional wisdom views these groups as obstructions to American democracy, but limiting their freedoms threatens "government by the people." Cases to be studied may include: senior citizen groups, the farm lobby, the Christian Coalition, the unemployment workers movement, and the power of business in America.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3131. Urban Politics and Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents an overview of the politics of urban areas: electoral politics, government structure, race, finance, education, housing, neighborhoods, and economic and historical forces on politics in urban areas.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3132. Urban Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is part of a six-credit course sequence comprised of a weekly seminar (POLS 3132) and a field placement component (POLS 4781). The course is intended to provide students who are interested in working with youth (aged 14-18) and on community and policy issues, with the understanding, training, and education that such work requires. The seminar will focus on issues of education, criminal justice, and media as they relate to youth in Philadelphia and beyond. Students will gain a better understanding of Philadelphia and its communities and develop research, critical thinking, facilitation, teamwork, and organizing skills. For the internship component, students will be placed in a youth civic engagement program run by the UCCP at Temple University (www.temple.edu/uccp). NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3133. Popular Culture and the City. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine how the city is depicted in films and literature, exploring such prominent political topics as anti-urbanism; political machines, corruption, and reform; industrialization and immigrant life; post-industrialism and urban decline. Attention will also be given to the physical city and spatial use as expressions of dominant political and cultural values.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3134. The Politics of Inequality. 3 Credit Hours.

Who are the poor? Should they be helped? Who should help them? These questions are complicated because people are more aware of the individual costs of taxation than they are of the collective benefits of an educated work force. This course will evaluate how the U.S. government has traditionally divided the poor between the deserving and the undeserving poor and which groups have been left out and why.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3151. Public Policy Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers selected contemporary public policy issues. The course begins with an examination of the national political-economic context within which major policy issues arise and then turns to the analysis of the roots and policy alternatives on several major issues. Issues may concern health, energy, education, employment, welfare, and the regulation of business.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3152. U.S. Environmental Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

An analytical examination of the development and execution of governmental policies in such areas as air and water pollution control, control of atomic energy, and planning of space exploration program.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3153. The Politics of Poverty. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the nature and causes of poverty, the impact of public opinion and racial attitudes on poverty and welfare, the role of government officials in shaping anti-poverty and welfare reform policies, and welfare claiming as a form of political participation. The course evaluates the effectiveness of existing policies to combat poverty and whether proposed policies might be effective.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3154. Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Surveys major public health problems and policy interventions in the United States with an emphasis on their normative, political and economic dimensions. Examines the interplay of governmental institutions, business, and organized interests in formulating and implementing health policy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3155. Business and Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Reviews history of U.S. government and business, and the major governmental institutions dealing with business, with special attention paid to monetary policy and the Federal Reserve, fiscal policy, the federal budget, and particular issues connected with it such as deficits, Social Security, the tax structure, overall inequality, and other current issues. Also looks at the World Trade Organization and NAFTA, their structure and overall advantages and disadvantages to the U.S.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3161. Public Administration. 3 Credit Hours.

This course studies basic concepts and approaches to public management and public policymaking in public administration.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3196. Urban Politics & Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

A course that introduces students to political science methodological approaches to the study of the various aspects of urban politics in American cities. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a university Core Studies in Race and Writing Intensive (WR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: WR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3197. Political Fiction. 3 Credit Hours.

Moral dilemmas and unintended burlesques, flawed heroes and vainglorious fools, ambitious men and seductive women are the stuff of both literature and politics. These elements are brought to life in novels about American politics and political thought. Students in this writing intensive course will write brief essays and a course paper on novels by authors that include Henry Adams, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, Henry James, Robert Penn Warren, Graham Greene, Ward Just, and William Kennedy.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3201. Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

When the U.S. was founded as the first modern nation-state, it set in motion a global transformation of the state system that has still to run its course. The class will study, with the aid of film, the causes, theories, and projections of this development.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3202. Politics & Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

What sorts of relationships exist between the world of politics and that of religious beliefs and practices that co-exist and often compete for dominance in various political systems?

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3203. Comparative Politics of Democratization. 3 Credit Hours.

Democracy is among the oldest concepts in politics, yet it is also one of the most elusive. This course surveys some of the classic debates over the meanings of democracy, and explores the contemporary processes of democratization that have swept the globe since the 1970s. While particular geographical emphasis will be placed on Europe, Latin America, and Africa, no prior familiarity with these regions is necessary to successfully complete this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1921|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 3211. Politics & Society in Modern Italy. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of Italy's political development in a historical framework, and in comparison to other nations, especially those of Europe.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3212. British Government and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course combines historical and thematic approaches to British politics. We begin with an overview of the post-imperial, capitalist state before discussing key institutions: constitution, Parliament, executive, parties, and European Union. To help understand change in popular politics we compare the 1983 and 2005 general election campaigns. Finally, we consider key issues: economic inequality, ethnic conflict, social order, and democratic accountability.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3213. Post-Communist Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines core themes in the study of post-Communist politics in Russia and Eastern Europe. The course begins by exploring the nature of socialism, why it fell, and the various legacies of this system. The rest of the course covers issues of democratic transformation, economic reform, state and nation building, and the role of international influences.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3241. Mideast Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to the various political systems in the region we now call the Middle East. Of particular concern will be historical roots of the political tensions that exist in our contemporary world.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3251. China: State and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys contemporary Chinese politics and political economy, recognizing the roots in China's long history. The emphasis is on the process of converting the Maoist socialist system into a modern market system, integrated into the global system, and the political implications of these changes. Note: Prior to fall 2010, the course title was "China: Politics and Revolution."

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3252. East Asia and the United States. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces Japan and its distinctive model of political economy. The course then reviews how this model has been copied by many other countries in Asia. The course also includes an analysis of Asia's international economic and political relations, especially with the United States.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3265. International Environmental Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

International negotiations and agreements on environmental problems, and comparisons of domestic environmental policymaking among selected countries. Special attention to negotiations on atmospheric and oceanic policies, international regulation of nuclear materials, and environmental aspects of international trade agreements.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3296. Politics of Modern Capitalism. 3 Credit Hours.

Since the early 1970s, all advanced industrial democracies have faced challenges in adjusting to a changing international economy. We will examine how different countries, including the United States, Japan, Britain, France, and Germany, have tried to meet these challenges. The main question guiding the course is: why do countries respond to roughly similar problems in different ways, and what do these responses reveal about politics in these countries? Topics covered will include macroeconomic policy, trade and industrial policies, industrial relations, business-government relations, and the welfare state.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3331. Politics of the European Union. 3 Credit Hours.

The European Union is perhaps the most remarkable experiment in international governance of the past century. This course examines the EU in its dual aspects: as a process of international or regional integration, tying existing nation-states into an "ever-closer Union of peoples"; and as a polity or political system with its own institutions, policies, and policy processes.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(POLS 1201|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1921|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (POLS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

POLS 3332. Globalization: Politics and Political Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines the origins and consequences of the modern period (1990-present) of globalization, including its political, economic, social, and cultural dimensions. Central issues to be examined will be the status of the sovereign state, global governance, and patterns of global mobility in production, people, and information.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(POLS 1301|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1931|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (POLS 2321|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently).

POLS 3411. Classical Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Close study of works by one or more political philosophers, stressing their relevance to an understanding of contemporary politics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3421. Theories of Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines both analytical and historical perspectives of some of the major theories of justice that have been propounded throughout the course of Western history.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3422. Marxism and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

A theoretical and historical examination of the role of Marxism in the development of 20th and 21st century political regimes, including West European social democracy, former and present Communist states, and post-colonial societies. Particular focus will be placed on debates within the Marxist tradition and between Marxism and its critics in regard to issues of equality, liberty, and democracy. An attempt will be made to see what aspects (if any) of Marxism remain relevant to the prospect of radical democratic change and to an analysis of the crisis of contemporary global capitalism.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3441. African American Political Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an intensive introduction to African American Political Theory. Our goal will be to explicate and evaluate the theoretical claims that have shaped, and continue to shape, black political practice in the United States. The structure of the course is both historical and thematic.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 2496|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 2996|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 3451. Personality and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

The democratic and authoritarian personalities and their impact on political behavior.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3452. Theory and Uses of Power. 3 Credit Hours.

This course considers concepts and major models of power and their applications to American politics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3500. Special Topics: Research Preparation Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Research preparation courses develop research skills and prepare students for the capstone seminar. The course topics vary depending on the instructor's expertise.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 3510. Special Topics: Research Preparation Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Research preparation courses develop research skills and prepare students for the capstone seminar. The course topics vary depending on the instructor's expertise.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 3520. Special Topics: Research Preparation Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Research preparation courses develop research skills and prepare students for the capstone seminar. The course topics vary depending on the instructor's expertise.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 3530. Special Topics: Research Preparation Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Research preparation courses develop research skills and prepare students for the capstone seminar. The course topics vary depending on the instructor's expertise.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 3540. Special Topics: Research Preparation Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Research preparation courses develop research skills and prepare students for the capstone seminar. The course topics vary depending on the instructor's expertise.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 3550. Special Topics: Research Preparation Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Research preparation courses develop research skills and prepare students for the capstone seminar. The course topics vary depending on the instructor's expertise.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 3910. Honors Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this Honors course varies from semester to semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 3911. Honors Politics in Film and Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines diverse topics in world politics using three forms of political commentary - film, literature, and academic writings - on each topic. Topics covered may include war, terrorism, development, globalization and workers, political corruption, immigration, racial politics, revolution, and ethnic violence.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3996. Junior Honors Capstone Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Only students enrolled in the Honors Certificate or Honors Scholars Programs may register for this seminar. Please check the Political Science Department web site for information about how to apply for the Honors Scholar Program in Political Science (www.temple.edu/polsci/undergraduate/honors/index.htm). This seminar (taught as a combined semester with Political Science 4996) will rotate among selected advanced topics in one of the major fields of Political Science (international relations, American government, political theory, comparative politics, and public policy). The seminar will focus on a close analysis and discussion of assigned readings and a final research paper (as well as other short written assignments). This course satisfies the capstone requirement for the major. NOTE: Check with the course schedule for the topic and instructor for a specific semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 3997. Junior Honors Capstone Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Only students enrolled in the Honors Certificate or Honors Scholars Programs may register for this seminar. Please check the Political Science Department web site for information about how to apply for the Honors Scholar Program in Political Science (www.temple.edu/polsci/undergraduate/honors/index.htm). This seminar (taught as a combined semester with Political Science 4997) will rotate among selected advanced topics in one of the major fields of Political Science (international relations, American government, political theory, comparative politics, and public policy). The seminar will focus on a close analysis and discussion of assigned readings and a final research paper (as well as other short written assignments). NOTE: Check with the course schedule for the topic and instructor for a specific semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4110. Seminar in American Government. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this seminar varies from semester to semester, but always considers some aspect of U.S. politics in depth.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1911|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 4121. Women and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to broaden with a comparative perspective our understanding of women's political experiences. We examine a variety of issues concerning the lives of women worldwide, including their economic, political and social contributions, familial roles and status in society. Initially, the course focuses on the evolution of the political, economic, and social status of American women paying particular attention to issues of race, ethnicity, and class that inform but also complicate women's political behavior. We then search for similarities and differences in women's lives that are usually obscured by the status of their countries as either industrialized or non-industrialized, either democratic or non-democratic.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4130. Seminar in American Government. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in American politics and government.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 1911|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 4131. Seminar in Campaign Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This special seminar is the academic component for experiential learning and is usually offered in the fall of an election year. Students learn about the structure and organization of campaigns, the motivations of candidates, and the consequences of campaign activities by other political actors such as interest groups and political parties. Students will use their internships to identify a thematic subject for research projects.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 1101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 4140. Seminar in Urban, State & Local Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

A seminar focusing on various aspects of the political relationships that exist between state and local levels of government.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4150. Seminar in Law & Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Experiential Learning. Students must also register for 4581 (0371). Permission of Instructor or Experiential Learning Coordinator required.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4160. Seminar in Public Administration. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in public administration.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4185. Internship I. 1 to 12 Credit Hour.

This internship course offers students the opportunity to gain practical experience in an area of interest. The course is designed to combine general academic experience with practical experience in fields such as public policy, local, state and federal government agencies, interest advocacy, campaigns and elections, law firms, government affairs, and NGOs, among others. The course does not have formal meeting times, but will meet several times during the semester of registration in a classroom/small setting. Students are responsible for working on their own to complete the required assignments.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4210. Seminar in Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in comparative politics.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4220. Seminar in Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminar focusing on comparative politics. Topic determined by the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4285. Internship II. 1 to 12 Credit Hour.

This internship course offers students the opportunity to gain practical experience in an area of interest. The course is designed to combine general academic experience with practical experience in fields such as public policy, local, state and federal government agencies, interest advocacy, campaigns and elections, law firms, government affairs, and NGOs, among others. The course does not have formal meeting times, but will meet several times during the semester of registration in a classroom/small setting. Students are responsible for working on their own to complete the required assignments.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4310. Seminar in International Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminar focusing on the politics of international relations. Topic determined by the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4320. Seminar in International Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in international politics.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4385. Internship III. 1 to 12 Credit Hour.

This internship course offers students the opportunity to gain practical experience in an area of interest. The course is designed to combine general academic experience with practical experience in fields such as public policy, local, state and federal government agencies, interest advocacy, campaigns and elections, law firms, government affairs, and NGOs, among others. The course does not have formal meeting times, but will meet several times during the semester of registration in a classroom/small setting. Students are responsible for working on their own to complete the required assignments.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4410. Seminar in Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in political philosophy.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4420. Seminar in Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in political philosophy.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4485. Campaign Internship. 1 to 12 Credit Hour.

This internship course offers students the opportunity to gain practical experience in political campaigns. Campaign placements may be for any type of campaign at any level of government. The course does not have formal meeting times, but students will meet with the instructor several times during the semester of registration in a classroom setting for discussions. Students are responsible for working on their own to complete the required written and work assignments.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4591. Directed Research and Field Study. 1 Credit Hour.

Supervised individual readings, research projects, and field work. NOTE: Students may not enroll for more than one Directed Research & Field Study course in a single semester. Students are to arrange study with a faculty member in the department of Political Science.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4691. Directed Research and Field Study. 2 Credit Hours.

Supervised individual readings, research projects, and field work. NOTE: Students may not enroll for more than one Directed Research & Field Study course in a single semester. Students are to arrange study with a faculty member in the department of Political Science.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4791. Directed Research and Field Study. 2 Credit Hours.

Supervised individual readings, research projects, and field work. NOTE: Students may not enroll for more than one Directed Research & Field Study course in a single semester. Students are to arrange study with a faculty member in the department of Political Science.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4891. Directed Research and Field Study. 3 Credit Hours.

Supervised individual readings, research projects, and field work. NOTE: Students may not enroll for more than one Directed Research & Field Study course in a single semester. Students are to arrange study with a faculty member in the department of Political Science.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4896. Capstone Seminar in Political Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This topical seminar focuses on a broad theme of theoretical, substantive, or practical interest within a subfield of political science. The specific content will vary with individual instructors. This is a writing-intensive course designed to integrate all the skills learned in the major. Each seminar will focus upon close oral and written analysis of major readings in a particular area of political science. Such analyses will take students beyond basic exegesis of analytic arguments towards critical evaluation of contrasting forms of social science investigation and argument. A research project is required. Required of all majors. To be taken during the senior year.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4904. Honors Seminar in Campaign Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Permission of political science Honors Director required. A seminar focusing on political election campaigns in the United States.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4920. University Honors Seminar in Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of Political Science 4210 (0310). Open only to University Honors students.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4940. University Honors Seminar in Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of Political Science 4410 (0321). Open only to University Honors students.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 4996. Senior Honors Capstone Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Only students enrolled in the Honors Certificate or Honors Scholars Programs may register for this seminar. Please check the Political Science Department web site for information about how to apply for the Honors Scholar Program in Political Science (www.temple.edu/polsci/undergraduate/honors/index.htm). This seminar (taught as a combined semester with Political Science 3996) will rotate among selected advanced topics in one of the major fields of Political Science (international relations, American government, political theory, comparative politics, and public policy). The seminar will focus on a close analysis and discussion of assigned readings and a final research paper (as well as other short written assignments). This course satisfies the capstone requirement for the major. NOTE: Check with the course schedule for the topic and instructor for a specific semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 4997. Senior Honors Capstone Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Only students enrolled in the Honors Certificate or Honors Scholars Programs may register for this seminar. Please check the Political Science Department web site for information about how to apply for the Honors Scholar Program in Political Science (www.temple.edu/polsci/undergraduate/honors/index.htm). This seminar (taught as a combined semester with Political Science 3997) will rotate among selected advanced topics in one of the major fields of Political Science (international relations, American government, political theory, comparative politics, and public policy). The seminar will focus on a close analysis and discussion of assigned readings and a final research paper (as well as other short written assignments). NOTE: Check with the course schedule for the topic and instructor for a specific semester.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8000. Topics in Research Design. 3 Credit Hours.

Students learn how to formulate and justify research questions, situate their research within the scholarly literature, select cases, and address problems related to making causal inferences. An important focus of the course is on the similarities and differences between quantitative and qualitative research designs and their respective strengths and weaknesses.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8001. Political Statistics I. 3 Credit Hours.

Required of all M.A. and Ph.D. students. Introductory applied social statistics. Topics covered include descriptive measures, elementary probability theory, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression analysis. This course explores inductive statistics including: probability and sampling, multivariate contingency tables, analysis of variance, correlation and regression analysis.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8002. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Required of all Ph.D. students. An examination of some of the major qualitative research approaches in political science -- case studies, comparative historical, institutional, community power studies, etc. The course aims to teach students the basic methods and reasoning procedures for doing advanced research in political science.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
(POLS 8001|Minimum Grade of B|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (POLS 8003|Minimum Grade of B|May not be taken concurrently).

POLS 8003. Political Statistics II. 3 Credit Hours.

The course offers a thorough coverage of the basic linear regression model. Two-thirds of the class is devoted to the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) method with a focus on estimation, hypothesis testing, and diagnosing threats to statistical inference. Cross-sectional, time-series, and panel data applications are covered. The remainder of the class introduces students to Maximum Likelihood estimators that address limitations to the OLS model.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
POLS 8001|May not be taken concurrently.

POLS 8101. Government in American Society. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to key theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of the major areas in American politics.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8102. American Presidency. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the state of Presidency research in political science. The American presidency is evaluated as an institution and as a position of political leadership.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8103. Legislative Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis and research on legislatures, legislators and the legislative process at national, state, and local levels. Focus on legislative decision-making.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8104. Politics of Organized Interests. 3 Credit Hours.

Critical examination of the role of interest groups in the American political system. Do interest groups hold government captive and interfere with the democratic process or do they strengthen democratic practice? Why do interest groups form? Do Political Action Committee (PAC) contributions buy votes? Is business the most powerful interest in American society?

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8105. Public Law. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the main political and legal factors affecting the development of the basic constitutional doctrines regarding judicial review, separation of powers, the presidency, foreign affairs, the basic delegated powers of Congress in the areas of regulation of commerce and taxation, and federalism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8106. Civil Rights and Liberties. 3 Credit Hours.

A critical overview and exploration of the evolution, and various aspects of U.S. anti-discrimination laws and policies using court decisions as well as political and legal theories.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8107. Business Politics and Power. 3 Credit Hours.

Course examines the role of business in politics. Includes a review some of the most important theoretical approaches that dominate the study of business political activity and its impact on policy outcomes.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8108. American Party System. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines political parties and party systems at the federal and state level, in both historical and contemporary contexts. What are political parties? Who forms them? This course focuses mostly on officeholders and activists to understand political parties in government and political parties as organizations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8109. Campaigns, Elections, and Media. 3 Credit Hours.

The role of elections in contemporary American society. Special attention to parties and mass media as managers of campaigns. Factors affecting the voting behavior of the mass public and the link voting provides between the public and policy formation. The role of elections in contemporary American society. Factors affecting the voting behavior of the mass public and the link voting provides between the public and policy formation. Special attention also will be paid to the roles of political parties and mass media.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8111. American Federalism. 3 Credit Hours.

This graduate seminar investigates how national, state, and local governments interact to create America's unique federal system. We will approach the topic of federalism from historical, legal, fiscal, and comparative perspectives. The dual goals of the course are to improve students' understanding of the key features and changing nature of American federalism and to introduce students to the diverse methodologies and theoretical approaches for studying this complex topic.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8112. Research in State Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces graduate students to the research investigating politics and governance in the American states. Seminar discussions will focus on identifying the questions motivating state politics research, comparing different methodological approaches, and discovering what questions remain unanswered. We also will consider how findings from state politics research might extend to other institutional settings. The goal of the seminar is to stimulate students to conduct their own state politics research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8113. Politics of Race and Class in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines the intersection of race and class in American cities from theoretical and practical perspectives. Readings cover some of the major theories of race and urban poverty going from the "declining significance of race" proponents on the one hand to the "increasing significance of race" theorists on the other end of the spectrum. The course also examines how considerations of race and class have shaped key policy areas such as housing, education, and community development. Finally, the course examines the "new immigration" and its impact on class and race relations within urban areas.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8114. Community Based Research. 3 Credit Hours.

Engages students in community based research projects that are identified and developed by community-based organizations to address a particular program or policy need that they have encountered. Students work closely with these organizations as they carry out the research. Field-based research is supported by weekly seminar meetings that combine instruction in research methods with substantive examination of community development issues. Students share their experiences from the field during the seminar meetings.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8115. Critique of American Government. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8119. Policy Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to policy analysis for MPP students. Policy analysis involves collecting and analyzing information pertinent to public policy issues and solutions and communicating them clearly to a client, which is usually a policymaker or administrator of a program. Policymakers need analyses that clearly define and describe the nature and severity of an issue, assess the feasibility and estimate the costs and benefits of alternative solutions for addressing them, and (often) recommend one or more courses of action over others. (Prior to spring 2017, the course title was Policy Analysis and Processes.)

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
College Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: Liberal Arts

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8120. Topics in Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8121. National Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Focuses on the content or substance of contemporary U.S. public policy and developing agendas in several salient areas such as environmental protection, economic development, education, public assistance, drug abuse, and civil rights.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8122. Urban Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Explores key areas of urban public policy, such as housing, economic and community development, and education. Examines the political, social, institutional and cultural factors that shape the policy making context and ultimately the policies themselves. Interdisciplinary approach using readings from political science, sociology, economics, planning and social history. Covers major research conducted on policy areas and central debates surrounding them.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8123. Bureaucracy and Public Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Bureaucracies and the public managers who inhabit them are of critical importance for the formulation, implementation and evaluation of public policies. This course provides students with an overview of bureaucratic agencies as key actors who shape public policy and performance. One focus of the course is how the institutional features of bureaucracies as large, complex organizations and of the broader political system in which they operate shape agencies' behavior. The other major focus is on how the leaders, managers and staff work together to shape bureaucratic cultures, missions and operating procedures and how these, in turn, determine whether the agency is capable of carrying out policies effectively and in accord with legislative mandates. (Prior to spring 2017, the course title was Political Organizations and Bureaucracies.)

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8124. Public Opinion and Propaganda. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of the broad field of public opinion research. Topics include: political sophistication, citizen competence, democratic responsiveness, political socialization, attitude formation, and the effects of mass media and political rhetoric.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8125. Theories of Policy Making. 3 Credit Hours.

Considers various models of the policy process and policymaking, including those within group, systemic, rational, and institutional approaches. Empirical and normative perspectives are both addressed.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8130. Topics in American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8140. Issues in American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8201. Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of core theories, methodological approaches and central issues in the comparative study of political systems throughout the world. Issues include state, class, party systems and interest groups, dependency, democracy and autocracy, reform and revolution, ethnic/nationalist conflict, and policymaking in industrial welfare states.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8202. Comparative Politics: Western Europe. 3 Credit Hours.

Comparative analysis of political systems in Western Europe. Topics covered include the development of political parties and interest group politics, political economy, the welfare state, democratization/market liberalization in Eastern Europe, and European integration (EU).

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8203. Comparative Politics: Developing Nations. 3 Credit Hours.

What are the ideological, economic, and political processes that have created "First" and "Third" worlds? Is "underdevelopment" a consequence of the international system or are its sources home-grown? What are the connections between economic processes and political change? This course compares rational, structural, and cultural approaches to the study of development.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8204. Latin American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will familiarize students with the rich histories of several Latin American countries and introduce region-specific actors and events, in the context of social scientific theorizing of such processes as colonialism, imperialism, regime change, revolution, democratization, identity politics, and issues in political economy.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8205. Russian and Eastern European Civilizations. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will familiarize students with the political development and transition to democracy in Russia and former republics of the Soviet Union.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8230. Topics in Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8240. Issues in Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8301. International Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

A graduate-level introduction to theories of international politics, ranging from classical realism and liberalism through contemporary neorealist, institutionalist, constructivist and other approaches. Core course in the area.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8302. International Security. 3 Credit Hours.

Graduate-level introduction to the study of international security, addressing a range of approaches to topics such as the causes of war, the balance of power, alliances, economic statecraft and sanctions, humanitarian intervention and peacekeeping, and terrorism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8303. International Political Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

A graduate-level introduction to the history and theory of international political economy. Topics include: states and markets; power and wealth; economic statecraft; international economic organizations; economic development; and the nature of interstate conflict and cooperation in the global economic system.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8304. International Organizations. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced graduate seminar, which surveys the scholarly literature dealing with the role of international institutions and international organizations in world politics, and the prospects for global governance in various issue-areas.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8305. US Foreign Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Graduate level introduction to the history and theory of American foreign policy. The seminar is arranged in three sections: the first offers a series of approaches to explaining American foreign policy, the second a survey of the past two-plus centuries of American foreign policy-making, and the last, a number of topics in contemporary foreign policy.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8306. Foreign Policy Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Graduate-level survey of foreign policy-making in comparative perspective. The course examines various theoretical accounts of the determinants of a state's foreign policy, including factors such as leadership, bureaucratic politics, perception and misperception, interest-group politics and public opinion, and survey the empirical literature on comparative public policy.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8330. Topics in International Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8340. Issues in International Relations. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8401. Introduction to Political Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the major conceptual issues in politics-- power, authority, equality, liberty, democracy, justice-­ through the reading of both classics in political thought and contemporary political theory. The course will also consider methodological issues in the social sciences and key topics in the philosophy of science and the philosophy of social science.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8402. History of Political Theory I. 3 Credit Hours.

Ancient and Medieval Political Theory -- This course will attempt to initiate students into the premodern origins of some of the key terms of the political vocabulary -- human nature, the good, justice, law, the rule of law, natural law, and the state. The course will try to highlight both the particularities and discontinuities that make ancient and medieval conceptions of these notions unique -- and also the ways in which ancient and medieval theorizing on these topics both sets the stage for later, more modern approaches to these questions and in certain cases actually merges into them.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8403. Modern Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will be devoted to in-depth analyses of some of the formative works of modern political theory and practice that have helped to shape not only modern politics but modern cultural and psychological sensibility as well. The primary theorists that we will be analyzing are Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, as well as some contemporary political philosophers. Texts and authors covered in this seminar will go beyond the materials covered in the Core Seminar in Political Theory.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8404. 19th and 20th Century Political and Social Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines the rise of modern social theory (Hegel, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Freud) as a response to the emergence of increasingly rationalized, class-stratified and bureaucratized industrial societies. Issues addressed include the relationship of the individual to society; the relationship between socio-economic and political power; the difficulty of establishing moral meaning in increasingly bureaucratic and routinized societies. The course will also examine post-modern theorists (e.g. Foucault, Derrida, Lyotard) who contend that modern social theory's anachronistic hypothesis of rational, industrial societies cannot adequately explain post-modern, commodified societies increasingly "decentered" by differences of culture, race, and gender.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8405. Contemporary Theories of Democracy. 3 Credit Hours.

Considers the defenses, criticisms, and varieties of democracy in both the American and worldwide settings. Examines the relationship between liberalism and democracy, as well as communitarian, conservative and radical critiques of liberal pluralism. Questions explored include: Can minority rights be guaranteed in a majoritarian democratic system? What are the cultural and socioeconomic prerequisites for a democratic society? Does the distribution of power in America today conform to the norms of a democratic society?

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8430. Problems in Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of some central themes and issues in political philosophy conducted through the study of one or more major works of political philosophy.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8440. Special Topics in Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics course. Subject varies with instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 8501. Symposium in Political Science. 3 Credit Hours.

Required of all M.A. and Ph.D. students. Development of political science as a field; analyzes issues in philosophy of social science; examines key concepts and approaches to major fields in Political Science.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 8601. Teaching Methods. 1 Credit Hour.

Required of all M.A. and Ph.D. students wishing to be considered for financial aid. This course is to be offered once each year. No student will be awarded financial assistance for a second year without having successfully completed this course. This course is conducted on a Pass-Fail basis.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

POLS 9083. Directed Study and Research I. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Fall credit for special study/research with a professor outside of a regularly scheduled course. A letter grade of A, B, C, or F is awarded. A student may register for this course only with the advance approval of the pertinent faculty member and the Graduate Chair.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 9183. Directed Study and Research II. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Spring credit for special study/research with a professor outside of a regularly scheduled course. A letter grade of A, B, C, or F is awarded. A student may register for this course only with the advance approval of the pertinent faculty member and the Graduate Chair.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 9283. Directed Study and Research III. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

First summer session credit for special study/research with a professor outside of a regularly scheduled course. A letter grade of A, B, C, or F is awarded. A student may register for this course only with the advance approval of the pertinent faculty member and the Graduate Chair.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 9383. Directed Study and Research IV. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Second summer session credit for special study/research with a professor outside of a regularly scheduled course. A letter grade of A, B, C, or F is awarded. A student may register for this course only with the advance approval of the pertinent faculty member and the Graduate Chair.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 9994. Preliminary Examination Preparation. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

The purpose of such credit is to assure continuous enrollment as required by the University while one is preparing for M.A. or Ph.D. comprehensive or Preliminary examinations. A grade of "R" is awarded the student by the Graduate Chair or other faculty designated by the Chair of the Department. The semester in which the Preliminary exams are passed, a grade other than "R" is awarded.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 9998. Pre-Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Three credits are required in the initial semester following the Preliminary Examinations while the Ph.D. student prepares the dissertation prospectus through a reading course with their primary dissertation supervisor. During subsequent semesters, if not yet advanced to candidacy, students continue to enroll in the 1-credit option in order to assure continuous enrollment as required by the university. Students must participate in the seminar until they execute a completed dissertation proposal. A grade of "R" is awarded until the student passes the prospectus defense. At the semester of passing the prospectus, the grade of "Pass" will be awarded to only that semester's 9998.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

POLS 9999. Dissertation Research. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Dissertation Research credit maintains the continuous enrollment as required by the University after a student has passed the Ph.D. comprehensive exam and prospectus defense. This is the minimum credit required each semester after the proposal defense and while the student is researching and writing the dissertation. A minimum of 6 s.h. of POLS 9999 must be completed before defending the Ph.D. dissertation.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
Student Attribute restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: Dissertation Writing Student

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..