Philosophy (PHIL)

Courses

PHIL 0811. Asian Behavior & Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

We incessantly engage ourselves in doing things. We are beings-at-doing. We define ourselves by the kind of actions we perform. How we act or conduct ourselves is shaped by the kind of self we construct for ourselves. And that self is shaped by the society into which we happen to be born. Self-identity, which is socially and culturally constructed by our experiences and interactions with others, carries a personal as well as an interpersonal meaning. Learn the four Asian paradigmatic cases of self-identity and examine your self in light of them. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ASST 0811, CRIT 0811, REL 0811/0911, Chinese 0811, or Japanese 0811.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0824. Landscape of American Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

America once was envisioned by its colonizers as a new world, as a city upon a hill beckoning to humanity. After centuries of conquest, enslavement, immigration, and political struggle, conditions for sustaining this early vision continue to evolve. Explore the emergence of some of the most distinctive and influential American voices to inform our national debate about freedom, the individual, race, democracy, and oppression, as it has unfolded over the past two centuries. Through consideration of selected works of some of the most renowned figures to shape the landscape of American public discourse, we return to face the question of the promise of America, as it plays out today in the thought of some of the leading public intellectuals of our time. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Philosophy 0924.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0839. Philosophy of the Human. 3 Credit Hours.

What is a human being? How do we become fully human, and how might that humanity be diminished or compromised? This course examines a range of answers to these questions from ancient, romantic, modern, postmodern, and postcolonial sources. Including the thought of Plato on the meaning of love, Emerson on our genius, Sartre on our agency, and Fanon on our liberation, discussion turns to some of the most influential literary, historical, and cinematic treatments of the human condition as it appears in our own time. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed PHIL 0939.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0847. The Meaning of the Arts. 3 Credit Hours.

As we blend philosophical inquiry into the nature of several of the arts and the roles they play in society with analyses of particular artistic practices, we shall critically examine questions like these: Is the main goal of art to imitate or represent the world? If so, do painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, movies, music, dance, theater, performance art, literature, handicrafts, fashion, bodily ornamentation and the like, provide knowledge about ourselves and the world around us? What is - or should be - the relationship between art and some of the other great domains of human thought, action, and concerns such as religion or the realm of social and political relations, especially matters concerning gender, sexuality, class, race, morality, and community? Do the arts or artistic institutions have specific social functions? For example, is there a connection between museums, imperialism, and nationalism? Are films embedded in networks of commodity production? Are there specifically urban or global dimension to these questions? NOTE: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Philosophy 0947.

Course Attributes: GA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0859. The Making of American Society: Melting Pot or Culture Wars?. 3 Credit Hours.

Terrorism, illegal immigration, gay marriage, religious conflict, political in-fighting, corporate corruption, racial animosities, civil liberties assaults, media conglomeration, Wal-Mart goes to China and the rich get richer. America in the 21st century is a contentious society. How did we get to this place in time? Examine what makes American society distinctive from other advanced industrial democracies as we study the philosophical origins of America, the development of social and economic relationships over time, and the political disputes dominating contemporary American life. The course relies heavily on perspectives from History, Sociology and Political Science to explain the challenges facing contemporary American society. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: AMST 0859, History 0859, POLS 0859, or SOC 0859.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0863. Religion in the World. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about the major religious traditions found worldwide today: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and several indigenous traditions. Examine the beliefs, practices, and values of these groups in order to understand the worldviews and ways of life of the people who practice them. Our interdisciplinary analysis and interpretation of specific examples of religious experience will help shed light on the overall meaning of religion and human existence. We will carefully consider examples while also focusing on particular thematic issues, like cosmology and ritual. Develop appreciation for the religious vibrancy and diversity that exist in human cultures while you actively engage in the learning process through class presentation, class participation, paper-writing, and a self-selected field trip. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Duplicate Credit Warning: Students may take only one of the following courses for credit; all other instances will be deducted from their credit totals: Religion 0863, 0963, 1101, C053, Asian Studies 0863, Critical Languages 0863, or Philosophy 0863.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0924. Honors Landscape of American Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

America once was envisioned by its colonizers as a new world, as a city upon a hill beckoning to humanity. After centuries of conquest, enslavement, immigration, and political struggle, conditions for sustaining this early vision continue to evolve. Explore the emergence of some of the most distinctive and influential American voices to inform our national debate about freedom, the individual, race, democracy, and oppression, as it has unfolded over the past two centuries. Through consideration of selected works of some of the most renowned figures to shape the landscape of American public discourse, we return to face the question of the promise of America, as it plays out today in the thought of some of the leading public intellectuals of our time. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Philosophy 0824.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GU, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0939. Honors Philosophy of the Human. 3 Credit Hours.

What is a human being? How do we become fully human, and how might that humanity be diminished or compromised? This course examines a range of answers to these questions from ancient, romantic, modern, postmodern, and postcolonial sources. Including the thought of Plato on the meaning of love, Emerson on our genius, Sartre on our agency, and Fanon on our liberation, discussion turns to some of the most influential literary, historical, and cinematic treatments of the human condition as it appears in our own time. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed PHIL 0839.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GB, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 0947. Honors The Meaning of the Arts. 3 Credit Hours.

As we blend philosophical inquiry into the nature of several of the arts and the roles they play in society with analyses of particular artistic practices, we shall critically examine questions like these: Is the main goal of art to imitate or represent the world? If so, do painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, movies, music, dance, theater, performance art, literature, handicrafts, fashion, bodily ornamentation and the like, provide knowledge about ourselves and the world around us? What is - or should be - the relationship between art and some of the other great domains of human thought, action, and concerns such as religion or the realm of social and political relations, especially matters concerning gender, sexuality, class, race, morality, and community? Do the arts or artistic institutions have specific social functions? For example, is there a connection between museums, imperialism, and nationalism? Are films embedded in networks of commodity production? Are there specifically urban or global dimension to these questions? (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed Philosophy 0847.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: GA, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1001. Philosophical Challenges to the Individual. 3 Credit Hours.

This course combines historical and contemporary sources to study individuals and their social settings. Thus it introduces the basic issues of ethics, and social and political philosophy. It serves as the entry course not only for further study of these fields, but also for the study of business and professional ethics and philosophy of law. NOTE: (1) Philosophy majors or minors who have taken 1101 (0100), Introduction to Philosophy, should not take this course. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual & Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1055. Critical Thinking. 3 Credit Hours.

A course in reasoning well: logically and critically. Increase your ability to read something and decide if it should persuade or be rejected. How to back up what you say with evidence and/or good arguments. While the course is not a "prep" for the LSAT's, and other exams that test critical abilities, it focuses directly on the skills necessary to do well in them. NOTE: Philosophy majors or minors who have taken 1066 (C066), Introduction to Logic should not take this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1061. Art and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Besides treating the major issues internal to the arts and their criticism (e.g., definitions of art and aesthetic experience, artistic expression, form, representation, critical interpretation and evaluation), the course also deals with wider questions of the social function and value of the arts, several of which relate to current issues of gender, race, and ethnicity. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AR

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1062. Morality and the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

Recommended for pre-law and pre-social administration students. The course provides a basic grounding in moral and legal philosophy, and addresses issues on which both touch, such as capital punishment, affirmative action, sexual behavior, and the right to welfare. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual & Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1063. American Thinkers. 3 Credit Hours.

The major figures and central problems of American philosophy will be surveyed historically, with a view to examining what is distinctive in American thought and how American philosophy relates to its natural cultural context. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: AC

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1066. Introduction to Logic. 3 Credit Hours.

The meaning of such logical notions as the validity of arguments, the equivalence of statements, and the inconsistency of sets of statements. Symbolization of the logically relevant features of statements and testing of arguments for validity, sets for inconsistency, etc. Development of logical theory in connection with these notions and techniques. NOTE: (1) Students who have taken Philosophy 1055 (0055), Critical Thinking, should consult with an advisor before taking this course. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Quantitative Reasoning B (QB) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: QB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1076. Philosophy East and West. 3 Credit Hours.

Systematic and comparative study of representative philosophies of India, China, Japan, and Western Europe. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/resources/coreupdates.htm#coreisupdate.

Course Attributes: IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1077. Science in Context. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of scientific method by critical examination of cases of scientific work in their social, political, and psychological context. Attention to the values and ethical concerns in scientific inquiry. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Science & Technology Second Level (SB) requirement.

Course Attributes: SB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Philosophical problems in the works of great thinkers from ancient times to present. Selected questions concern the nature of reality, human freedom, the foundations of knowledge, standards of value, and the existence of God. NOTE: Students who have taken 1001 (C050), Challenges to the Individual should consult with an advisor before taking this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1196. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to philosophy that focuses on the reading, thinking, and writing skills needed for the study of philosophy. The course concentrates on close readings of a few texts rather than a broad survey of the philosophical tradition. NOTE: This course fulfills one of the two writing requirements for the major.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1861. Art and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Besides treating the major issues internal to the arts and their criticism (e.g., definitions of art and aesthetic experience, artistic expression, form, representation, critical interpretation and evaluation), the course also deals with wider questions of the social function and value of the arts, several of which relate to current issues of gender, race, and ethnicity.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1955. Honors Critical Thinking. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of 1055 (0055).

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1962. Honors Morality & the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of 1062 (C062). NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual & Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1966. Honors Introduction to Logic. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of 1066 (C066). NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Quantitative Reasoning B (QB) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, QB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 1977. Honors Science in Context. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of scientific method by critical examination of cases of scientific work in their social, political, and psychological context. Attention to the values and ethical concerns in scientific inquiry. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Science & Technology Second Level (SB) requirement.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, SB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2100. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 2121. Introduction to Ethical Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to major schools of ethical theory such as utilitarian ethics, deontological ethics, virtue ethics, and the ethics of care. Specific problems from metaethics and applied ethics may also be treated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2125. Philosophy of African-American Experiences. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to African-American philosophy and the issues around which it has developed: the meaning of racial identity, concepts of personhood, the nature of racial oppression and its relation to gender and class oppression, strategies for black liberation. We will pay close attention to the ways in which African American philosophy is simultaneously a development of and a radical critique of Anglo-European philosophy. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2126. Contemporary Social Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of recent and current thinking about philosophically relevant problems of and in the present-day world. Normally a few key texts will be focused upon, drawn from writing of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Environment, racial tension, globalization, economy, the nature of power, generational conflict, and the persistence of war are some typical topics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2131. Introduction to Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses major issues internal to the arts and their criticism such as definitions of art and aesthetic experience, artistic expression, form, representation, critical interpretation and evaluation. The course may also address more specific issues such as the relationship of art and race, art and freedom of expression, art and morality. NOTE: Students who have taken PHIL 2931 will not earn additional credits for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2141. Philosophy of Biology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores a range of philosophical questions about biology, such as: What is the nature of biological explanation? Are there laws of biology? Is the current debate about creationism and intelligent design a scientific debate? Is there a unique taxonomy of biological organisms? Has human nature evolved? What is genetic determinism and is there any evidence for it? This course is geared toward scientifically-minded philosophers, philosophically-minded scientists, and everyone in between.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2144. Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. 3 Credit Hours.

An introductory overview of the most important issues in contemporary philosophy of mind and cognitive studies. Especially aimed at students of Psychology.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2154. Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of such issues as the source of obligation to obey the state, natural rights, the limits of governmental authority, and the justification of various forms of government. Readings drawn from classical and contemporary sources.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2157. Environmental Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the ethical dimensions of several contemporary environmental controversies. The course examines the major theoretical approaches to environmental ethics, including human-centered (anthropocentric), animal-centered (zoocentric), and nature-centered (biocentric and ecocentric) value systems, as well as the most important critiques of these ethical approaches. The course will also address specific issues such as biodiversity and wilderness preservation; human use of animals as food, entertainment, and research subjects; environmental racism and toxic dumping; sustainable development, population and consumption.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2161. History of Philosophy: Greek. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of ancient Greek philosophy from the Presocratics through the Hellenistic Period. Primary and secondary materials used.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2165. Hume, Marx, Darwin, and Freud. 3 Credit Hours.

An exploration of four major figures who are important in the rise of the social sciences. Their influence in the present will be stressed.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2172. History of Philosophy: Modern. 3 Credit Hours.

A historical and critical study of the thought of selected philosophers from Descartes to Hume emphasizing their treatment of such topics as perception, the mind/body relationship, the structure of knowledge, and personal identity.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2196. Perspectives on Science and Mathematics. 3 Credit Hours.

"Perspectives on Science and Mathematics" is a 3-credit upper-division Philosophy course designed to meet the unique needs of future K-12 teachers of science and mathematics. It is one of the specially-designed content courses in the TUteach Program. It is designed to be taken in the fall of the third year of this program, and also satisfies Writing Intensive and Liberal Arts course requirements. This course is an upper-level introductory course on the Nature of Science (NOS). It uses the history of science, philosophy of science, sociology of science, gender and race theory and ethics of science to look at science and mathematics from a variety of perspectives. Detailed case studies include the Copernican Revolution, the Darwinian Revolution, the history of genetics and eugenics, contemporary controversies in genetic technology and controversies in mathematics (pure, applied and ethnomathematics). A central theme of the course is that science and mathematics have been advanced by the struggles of diverse people, on the basis of often-conflicting criteria and interests. "Textbook science" is the result of multiple developments, contestations, and eventually general acceptance. While science produces and relies on empirical evidence, it has a creative component that is influenced by historical, cultural, ideological and psychological factors.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2596. Philosophical Perspectives on the Environment. 3 Credit Hours.

Views both historical and modern on our relationship to the natural world around (and in) us, and the terms in which we can best think about it.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2921. Honors Introduction to Ethical Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of Philosophy 2121 (0121).

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2925. Honors Philosophy of African-American Experiences. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of 2125 (R125). NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO, RS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2931. Honors Introduction to Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses major issues internal to the arts and their criticism such as definitions of art and aesthetic experience, artistic expression, form, representation, critical interpretation and evaluation. The course may also address more specific issues such as the relationship of art and race, art and freedom of expression, art and morality. NOTE: Students who have taken PHIL 2131 will not earn additional credits for this course.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 2957. Honors Environmental Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the ethical dimensions of several contemporary environmental controversies. The course examines the major theoretical approaches to environmental ethics, including human-centered (anthropocentric), animal-centered (zoocentric), and nature-centered (biocentric and ecocentric) value systems, as well as the most important critiques of these ethical approaches. The course will also address specific issues such as biodiversity and wilderness preservation; human use of animals as food, entertainment, and research subjects; environmental racism and toxic dumping; sustainable development, population and consumption.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3075. Pre-Law Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

The companion course to Philosophy 3085 (0198), Pre-Law Internship. The course deals with issues related to lawyers and the practice of law such as professional ethics, legal reasoning and the nature of legal education. Must be taken in conjunction with Philosophy 3085 (0198). NOTE: Requires permission of instructor to register. Students must consult with the instructor in the Fall to arrange an internship placement.

Co-requisites: PHIL 3085

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3085. Pre-Law Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

Internship with a legal office or law-related office in the Philadelphia area. Must be taken in conjunction with Philosophy 3075 (0199), Pre-Law Seminar. NOTE: Must consult course instructor in the Fall to arrange placement.

Co-requisites: PHIL 3075

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 3116. Development of Western Cosmology. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of how modern cosmology developed from its roots in Egypt and Asia, through the classical ancient world, Islam and the Middle Ages, to the great discoveries of the modern and contemporary periods in understanding space and time.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3133. Philosophy of Education. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of contemporary theories of learning and teaching. Some of the authors likely to be encountered are bell hooks, Pierre Bourdieu, Martha Nussbaum, etc. The broader social contexts within which education takes place will be explored.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3168. Themes in Existentialism. 3 Credit Hours.

The meaning of life and death, freedom and anxiety, joy and suffering, faith and despair -- these and other dimensions of the human condition will be explored. The course covers existential philosophers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Camus, and Sartre, though it may also focus on existentialism in film, existentialism in theater and literature, or non-Western philosophies of existence.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3210. Special Topics in Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 3211. Intermediate Logic. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the meta theory of the elementary logic of predicates and quantifiers (familiarity with which is presupposed). Proofs that a standard derivation system is sound and complete are central.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PHIL 1066|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR PHIL 1966|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PHIL 3216. Philosophy of Science. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic issues in the current philosophy of science, and particularly various accounts of such key notions of science as hypotheses, confirmation, laws, causation, explanation, and theories.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3217. Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. 3 Credit Hours.

Human knowledge is influenced by gender ideologies. This course examines the pervasiveness of these influences, and the resultant implications for the possibility of attaining objectivity and truth in inquiry. Scientific knowledge and philosophical theories of the nature of knowledge are special focuses of attention in this course. Scientific knowledge is considered through detailed discussion of cases in empirical science. The complex relations between gender, race, and class are also discussed in relation to these epistemological issues.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3218. Philosophy of Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

Philosophy of Medicine is a new and growing field in philosophy of science and the medical humanities, which looks at the specific characteristics of theories in medicine and ways of knowing in medicine. It asks questions such as: What is the meaning of illness and of health? Are some diseases (e.g. end stage renal disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, ADHD) partly or wholly socially constructed? What are the differences between conventional and alternative or non-Western approaches to illness and healing? What is "evidence based medicine," and what are its limitations? What is the new technique of "narrative medicine?" What is meant by claiming that medicine is an "art" as well as a science? We will learn about the "biopsychosocial" model of clinical care, causation and genetic disease, the classification of diseases and phenomenological accounts of illness.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3220. Special Topics in Philosophy. 4 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 3222. Contemporary Ethical Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Issues in ethical theory that have come to prominence since the 20th century. Both meta-ethical issues (about the meaning and justification of ethical statements) and normative issues (about obligation, responsibility, and goodness) will be examined.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3223. Feminist Ethics and Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of feminism's contribution to ethics, political philosophy, and legal theory. Issues may include: the role of care versus that of justice in determining moral obligations; the nature and causes of women's oppression (including the difference between the sexual oppression experienced by white women and the additional forms of oppression to which women of color/third-world women are subject); pornography and prostitution; equality and difference; essentialism as it pertains to gender and race; feminist jurisprudence; postmodern feminism.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3225. Good & Bad, Right & Wrong. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on basic concepts in ethics. For example, good and bad, right and wrong are among the most basic ethical concepts. Other basic ethical concepts include: freedom, justice, morality, practical reason, happiness, obligation, duty, rights, value, conscience, care, trust, and friendship. From semester to semester the course will select one or more of these concepts and examine them in depth. The standard method of examination in philosophy is conceptual analysis, that is, the analysis of concepts. But depending on the concepts chosen, the examination will be informed or supplemented by the study of language, psychology, or history.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3226. Classics in Moral Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the major works in the history of moral philosophy selected from among the writings of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Spinoza, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, Moore.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3232. History of Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of major works in the history of aesthetics selected from such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Dewey, Bell, Collingwood, Beardsley, Langer, Dickie, Danto, and contemporary figures.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3234. Philosophy of Music. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of philosophical issues concerning the nature and value of music, such as the nature of composition, performance, and appreciation of music, the varieties of musical meaning, the relation of music to the emotions, and the social importance of music.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3235. Classics in Moral Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the major works in the history of moral philosophy. This course will generally focus on figures and schools from classical Greek and Roman moral philosophy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3240. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 3243. Philosophy of Law. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to philosophical problems arising in the examination of legal systems, including questions and theories about the nature of law itself, about legal responsibility and legal punishment, and about standards of fairness in settling legal disputes.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3245. Philosophy of Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Throughout its history, philosophy has taken an interest in psychology. In the theory of knowledge, philosophers have been concerned with cognition and its particular forms and components: perception, belief, concepts, and reasoning. In ethics, philosophers have been concerned with action and emotion. And in metaphysics, they have been interested in the nature of the mind itself and consciousness. Central to this course are topics and questions at the intersection of philosophy and contemporary empirical psychology. The choice of topics varies from semester to semester.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3249. Ethics in Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of ethical issues generated by the application of scientific and technological advances to the preservation, destruction, and programming of human life. Topics may include: ethics of medical research, abortion, euthanasia, behavior control, allocation of scarce medical resources, and the ethics of patient-physician interaction. NOTE: Students who have taken PHIL 3949 will not earn additional credits for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3280. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester; please consult with the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 3282. Undergraduate Tutorial. 2 Credit Hours.

Independent study for undergraduates with one of the professors in the department. NOTE: Arrangements with that professor must be made before signing up for the course.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 3283. Undergraduate Tutorial. 3 Credit Hours.

Independent study for undergraduates with one of the professors in the department. NOTE: Arrangements with that professor must be made before signing up for the course.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 3910. Honors Special Topics in Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 3949. Honors Ethics in Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an exploration of ethical issues generated by the application of scientific and technological advances to the preservation, destruction, and programming of human life. Topics may include: ethics of medical research, abortion, euthanasia, behavior control, allocation of scarce medical resources, and the ethics of patient-physician interaction. NOTE: Students who have taken PHIL 3249 will not earn additional credits for this course.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 3968. Honors Themes in Existentialism. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of 3168 (0186).

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4221. Social and Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course studies the major value questions that are addressed in contemporary theories of the nature of society and the state, including the requirements of justice in the distribution of benefits and burdens within a political society, and the justification of democracy as not only processes of majority rule but as involving participation and deliberation among citizens. The recognition of cultural identities and the role of gender and race are considered, and proposed norms of inclusiveness and diversity are analyzed. The course goes on to take up the challenge posed for philosophical theory by globalization in its economic and ecological impacts, and analyzes the norms of human rights and solidarity across borders that may be relevant in this new context. An emphasis will be placed on alternative philosophical frameworks within contemporary social and political philosophy, such as contractarianism, consequentialism, and care ethics. Readings will include such philosophers as John Rawls, Jurgen Habermas, Thomas Pogge, Iris Marion Young, and Nancy Fraser.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PHIL 2000 to 4999| Required Courses:1|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR POLS 2496|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PHIL 4225. Metaethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the foundations of ethical value, including the metaphysics of ethical value, the semantics of ethical language, normativity, and the relation between kinds of value such as instrumental, final, intrinsic, and extrinsic as well as personal, ethical, moral, and prudential. This course is designed for students who have done some advanced work in philosophy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4229. Philosophy in Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected philosophical themes as they appear in classical and modern literature. Frequently the themes concern the "enlightenment project," "modernism," and their critics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4233. Problems in Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the philosophical issues concerning the nature and importance of the arts and artistic practice, including questions about the nature of aesthetic experience, the definition of art, representation and expression in art, the ontological status of artworks, truth and reference in art, and the values of art.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4240. Topics in the Philosophy of Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics - varies according to the expertise of the instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 4241. Theory of Knowledge. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of knowledge and belief. The specific subtopics involving them include truth, perception, innate ideas, justification, induction, the a priori, mathematical knowledge and rationalism versus empiricism.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4242. Metaphysics. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the most general features of the universe. Topics include the character of truth, the existence of abstract entities, the nature of persons, free will, the existence or non-existence of God, ontological commitment, the relation of philosophy to science, causation, modal properties, reality and appearance, and various forms of realism and anti-realism.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4244. Philosophy of Mind. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the character of mental and psychological states. Specific issues may include the nature of persons, relations between natural and psychological sciences, action, mental content and its relation to language.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4251. Philosophy of Language. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of theories of meaning and meaningfulness. Selected topics may include reference, vagueness, speech act theory, and metaphor. NOTE: Students who have taken PHIL 4951 will not earn additional credit for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits

Pre-requisites:
PHIL 1196|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

PHIL 4253. Philosophy of History. 3 Credit Hours.

Problems of historical knowledge, e.g., problems about the historian's claim to explain historical events (causation in history, reasons for actions, challenges to the objectivity of history) and problems about historical interpretation (including global interpretations of the historical process, such as Augustine's, Kant's, and Hegel's).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4268. Indian Philosophy: An Introduction. 3 Credit Hours.

Beginnings of Indian philosophical thinking in the hymns of Rig Veda and the Upanishads and the major schools of Indian philosophy as they took shape during the next thousand years. The latter include Samkhya, the Buddhist schools, the Vaiseskika, the Nyaya, and the major schools of Vedanta. Issues in metaphysics, epistemology, and logic emphasized.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4269. Contemporary British and American Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 20th and 21st century English-speaking philosophy, varying according to instructor and semester.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4271. 19th Century Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected European philosophers from Hegel to Bradley.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4273. Greek Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Interpretation and critical examination of the dialogues of Plato and the works of Aristotle.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4274. Pragmatism and American Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

American pragmatism and naturalism, with emphasis on Emerson, James, Peirce, Mead, Dewey, and contemporary pragmatists.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4275. British Empiricism. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 17th and 18th century philosophers such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Reid.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4276. Contemporary Continental Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Phenomenology and existentialism, with emphasis on such 20th century philosophers as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, Derrida, and other post-structuralists.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4277. Continental Rationalism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to selected topics in 17th and 18th century philosophers in the Rationalist tradition such as Descartes, Spinoza, Malebranche and Leibniz.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4278. Philosophy of Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses central themes in philosophy of culture such as philosophical problems raised by the notion of cultural conditions of possibility, the relation of mythic knowledge to scientific and philosophical knowledge, the role of signs and symbols in the theories of culture, and the distinction between a philosophical anthropology and anthropological theory.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4279. Kant. 3 Credit Hours.

In depth study of some of the major critical writings of Kant.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4282. Undergraduate Tutorial. 3 Credit Hours.

Independent study for undergraduates with one of the professors in the department. NOTE: Arrangements with that professor must be made before signing up for the course.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 4297. Pre-Law Tutorial. 3 Credit Hours.

An alternative capstone course for majors headed toward the legal profession.

Field of Study Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of study: Philosophy

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4298. Senior Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

The normal capstone course for philosophy majors.

Field of Study Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of study: Philosophy

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4951. Honors Philosophy of Language. 3 Credit Hours.

Philosophy of Language is the study of theories of meaning and meaningfulness. Selected topics may include reference, vagueness, speech act theory, and metaphor. NOTE: Students who have taken PHIL 4251 will not earn additional credit for this course.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 4999. Honors Senior Thesis. 3 Credit Hours.

The writing of the thesis required for graduation with distinction in philosophy.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 5210. Special Topics in Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 5211. Intermediate Logic. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will go through the soundness and completeness proofs for a first-order deductive system (i.e., the kind used in intro logic). The main goal of the course will be to deepen the students' understanding of logic by acquainting them with these formal results. But we'll also try to spend a little time on some philosophical issues (e.g., what, if anything, does logic have to do with reasoning).

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5216. Philosophy of Science. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic issues in the current philosophy of science, and particularly various accounts of such key notations of science as hypotheses, confirmation, laws, causation, explanation, and theories.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5217. Feminist Epistemology and the Philosophy of Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the effects of gender on scientific creativity, method and decision making. Thomas Kuhn, in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), was one of the first to show that political, social and psychological factors affect scientific change. Feminist criticisms of science, developed over the last thirty years, are one way in which his views have been developed. We will examine cases from a wide range of sciences to see where, and how, gender influences scientific practice. The complex relations between gender, race, class and nationality will also be discussed in relation to these issues. Central questions of the course will be: How pervasive is gender bias in science? Can gender bias be eliminated, and is it desirable to do so? Does the reduction of gender bias require an increased representation of women in science? Can the popular view that science is objective, truth-seeking and progressive be maintained in the face of findings of gender bias? We will read from the work of Evelyn Fox Keller, Donna Haraway, Sandra Harding, Helen Longino, Alison Wylie and others.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5218. Philosophy of Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5220. Special Topics in Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 5221. Social and Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5222. Contemporary Ethical Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Issues in ethical theory that have come to prominence in the 20th century. Both meta-ethical issues (about the meaning and justification of ethical statements) and normative issues (about obligation, responsibility, and goodness) will be examined.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5223. Feminist Ethics and Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of feminism's contribution to ethics, political philosophy, and legal theory. Issues may include: the role of care versus that of justice in determining moral obligations; the nature and causes of women's oppression (including the difference between the sexual oppression experienced by white women and the additional forms of oppression to which women of color/third-world women are subject); pornography and prostitution; equality and difference; essentialism as it pertains to gender and race; feminist jurisprudence; postmodern feminism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5225. Metaethics. 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines the foundations of ethical value, including the metaphysics of ethical value, the semantics of ethical language, normativity, and the relation between kinds of value such as instrumental, final, intrinsic, and extrinsic as well as personal, ethical, moral, and prudential.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5226. Classics in Moral Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will introduce students to Greek ethical thought through seminal texts in this genre.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5229. Philosophy in Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected philosophical themes as they appear in classical and modern literature. Frequently the themes concern the "enlightenment project," "modernism," and their critics.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5230. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 5232. History of Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of major works in the history of aesthetics selected from such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Dewey, Bell, Collingwood, Beardsley, Langer, Dickie, Danto, and contemporary figures.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5233. Problems in Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5234. Philosophy of Music. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of philosophical issues concerning the nature and value of music, such as the nature of composition, performance, and appreciation of music, the varieties of musical meaning, the relation of music to the emotions, and the social importance of music.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5235. Classics in Moral Philosophy II. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the major works in the history of moral philosophy selected from among the writings of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Spinoza, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, Moore.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5240. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Arranged each semester. Please consult the instructor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 5241. Theory of Knowledge. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of knowledge and belief. The specific subtopics involving them include truth, perception, innate ideas, justification, induction, the priori, mathematical knowledge and rationalism versus empiricism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5242. Metaphysics. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the most general features of the universe. Topics include the character of truth, the existence of abstract entities, the nature of persons, free will, the existence or non-existence of God, ontological commitment, the relation of philosophy to science, causation, modal properties, reality and appearance, and various forms of realism and anti-realism.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5243. Philosophy of Law. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to philosophical problems arising in the examination of legal statements, including questions and theories about the nature of law itself, about legal responsibility and legal punishment, and about standards of fairness in settling legal disputes.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5244. Philosophy of the Mind. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the character of mental and psychological states. Specific issues may include the nature of persons, relations between natural and psychological sciences, action, mental content, and its relation to language.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5249. Ethics in Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of ethical issues generated by the application of scientific and technological advances to the preservation, destruction, and programming of human life. Topics may include: ethics of medical research, abortion, euthanasia, behavior control, allocation of scarce medical resources, and the ethics of patient-physician interaction.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5250. Topics in the Philosophy of Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines select topics in the philosophy of psychology such as philosophical treatments of the nature of cognition, perception, and sensation, as well as emotion, intention, action, and moral psychology.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 5251. Philosophy of Language. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of a number of theories of meaning and reference that have played a role in current philosophizing.  Also, it is has been said that many perennial philosophical issues are at bottom linguistic ones. To better evaluate this sort of claim, I hope we are able to allot time to study a selection of linguistic approaches to a variety of philosophical claims in areas such as epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and ethics. We will approach these topics from number of influential writings, both historical and contemporary.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5253. Philosophy of History. 3 Credit Hours.

Problems of historical knowledge, e.g., problems about the historian's claim to explain historical events (causation in history, reasons for actions, challenges to the objectivity of history) and problems about historical interpretation (including global interpretations of the historical process, such as Augustine's, Kant's, and Hegel's.)

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5268. Indian Philosophy: An Introduction. 3 Credit Hours.

Beginnings of Indian philosophical thinking in the hymns of Rig Veda and the upanishads and the major schools of Indian philosophy as they took shape during the next thousand years. The latter include samkhya, the Buddhist schools, the Vaiseskika, the Nyaya and the major schools of Vedanta. Issues in metaphysics, epistemology, and logic emphasized.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5269. Contemporary British and American Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 20th and 21st century English-speaking philosophy, varying according to instructor and semester.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5271. Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected European philosophers from Hegel to Bradley.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5272. Philosophy of Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to address central themes in philosophy of culture, such as philosophical problems raised by the notion of cultural conditions of possibility, the relation of mythic knowledge to scientific and philosophical knowledge, the role of signs and symbols in theories of culture, the philosophical significance of psychoanalysis, and the distinction between a philosophical anthropology and anthropological theory.  This course will be topical in nature, which means that it can be taken each year as different dimensions of the subject receive focus.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5273. Greek Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Interpretation and critical examination of the dialogues of Plato and the works of Aristotle.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5274. Pragmatism and American Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

American pragmatism and naturalism, with emphasis on Emerson, James, Peirce, Mead, Dewey, and contemporary pragmatists.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5275. British Empiricism. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 17th- and 18th-century philosophers such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Reid.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5276. Contemporary Continental Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Phenomenology and existentialism, with emphasis on such 20th century philosophers as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, Derrida, and other post-structuralists.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5277. Africana Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Africana philosophy is an area of philosophy that focuses on philosophy as it emerges out of the African Diaspora.  As such, it encompasses African philosophy, Afro-Caribbean and Afro-Latin American philosophy, African-American philosophy, and Africana critical race theory. Each semester's offering will be different. Sometimes the course will cover themes from just one or two of these areas, other times the instructor may choose to present a "survey" of the entire field.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5278. Continental Rationalism. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to selected topics in 17th- and 18th-century philosophers in the Rationalist tradition such as Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 5279. Kant. 3 Credit Hours.

In depth study of some of the major critical writings of Kant.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8601. Pro-Seminar in 20th-Century Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the pro-seminar is the acquaint students with philosophical methodology and reasoning from a variety of influential perspectives in the field. The Pro-Seminar is taught by different faculty each semester. Content and course material are at the instructors discretion.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8602. Seminar in Greek Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine Greek philosophical conceptions of pleasure and hedonism. We will begin with some Presocratic material, then move to Plato (selections from Gorgias, Protagoras, Republic). We will examine Plato's Philebus in its entirety. Thereafter, we will look at Aristotle's treatments in Nicomachean Ethics VII and X, including Eudoxus' arguments, as well as Rhetoric I. Finally, we will consider the hedonism of the Cyrenaics and Epicureans.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8611. Seminar in Continental Rationalism. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 17th- and 18th-century philosophers such as Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8616. Seminar in British Empiricism. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in 17th- and 18th-century philosophers such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Reid.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8621. Seminar in Kant. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8626. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8631. Seminar in Contemporary Continental Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8636. Seminar in Contemporary British and American Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8641. Seminar in American Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics in the thought of American philosophers, especially the American pragmatists such as James, Dewey, and Pierce.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8666. Seminar in Philosophy of the Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8701. Seminar in Aesthetics. 3 Credit Hours.

The general plan of the seminar is to explore the master thinkers of continental aesthetics from an analytic vantage and against the dominant themes of Anglo-American aesthetics. I anticipate drawing on a good selection of continental authors and a specimen or two of a more sustained treatment. This would involve, for instance, a selection among the classic figures spanning Kant and Hegel, phenomenology, hermeneutics, structuralism, post-structuralism, and the Frankfurt-critical school at least. Proposals of topics or figures are welcome.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8704. Seminar in Philosophy of Literary Criticism. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics concern the critic's task of describing, interpreting, and judging literary works, e.g., the language of poetry, metaphor, style, form, symbolism, truth, evaluation, obscenity.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8712. Seminar in Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8721. Seminar in Social and Political Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar will examine three core approaches in contemporary political philosophy--Rawlsian contractarianism, Habermassian critical social theory, and feminist political theory--and will critically analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each through a study of their main exponents. Since recent controversies in social and political philosophy have tended to focus on global issues, some attention will be given to how these three approaches address questions of global justice, political ecology, and cooperation and solidarity across borders.  The seminar will proceed through a close study of key texts from each approach and will involve oral presentations by participants and an original research paper.  Readings will include John Rawls, Thomas Pogge, Jurgen Habermas, Iris Marion Young, Alison Jaggar, and Nancy Fraser.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8731. Seminar in the Philosophy of the Mind. 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of current views of such topics as materialistic accounts of mind, intentionality, the analysis of specific mental phenomena (e.g., belief, consciousness, emotion, desire), ascription of mental attributes to machines.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8741. Seminar in Epistemology. 3 Credit Hours.

For the most part, we will closely study disputes surrounding foundationalism. Originally a theory about justified belief, foundationalism has become a watchword in wider cultural wars. Because its wider use is not wholly unrelated to its original use in the theory of knowledge, it is certainly something on which we should try to achieve clarity. A recent anthology entitled Contemporary Debates in Epistemology, edited by Matthias Steup & Ernest Sosa contains essays, pro and con, on various aspects of this issue, written by a number of leading epistemologists, and with both defenses and critiques of each of the positions involved. The topics in the anthology cover, among other things, the nature of justification, a priori knowledge, perception, skepticism, the ethics of belief, truth, and context. The hope is that we can work through the 11 sections of this text to achieve a better grasp of the issues and their broader implications for our understanding.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8746. Seminar in Metaphysics. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 8755. Seminar in the Philosophy of Language. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is devoted to topics in the philosophy of language such as meaning, reference, metaphor, speech-act theory, and vagueness.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

PHIL 9682. Tutorial. 6 Credit Hours.

Independent study for graduates with a professor within the department, usually their advisor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 9782. Tutorial. 9 Credit Hours.

Independent study for graduates with a professor within the department, usually their advisor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 9882. Tutorial. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Independent study for graduates with a professor within the department, usually their advisor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 9982. Tutorial. 3 Credit Hours.

Independent study for graduates with a professor within the department, usually their advisor.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 9994. Preliminary Examination Preparation. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 9996. Master's Thesis Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 9998. Pre-Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Registration required each semester after Preliminary Examinations while researching the dissertation proposal.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..

PHIL 9999. Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate
Student Attribute restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: Dissertation Writing Student

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit..