Criminal Justice (CJ)

Courses

CJ 0812. Criminal Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Although we like to think differently, committing crime is an extremely common human behavior. From the extremes of armed robbery or serial murder to the ordinary failure to declare income on tax returns or the tendency to speed on the highway, nearly everyone has broken the law and committed a crime at some point. Considering physiological, psychological and pharmacological factors, we explore the influences of family, peers and the effects of alcohol and drugs on the incidence of criminal behavior. And we examine how the urban and social environment encourages (or inhibits) opportunities to commit crime. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ 0912.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 0852. Justice in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course invites students to engage in an interdisciplinary examination of one of U.S. society's most enduring conflicts - the struggle to achieve an acceptable balance between state power to prevent and control crime, and the rights of individuals to be free from undue government coercion. Within the context of the structures and processes of the criminal justice system, students will investigate a select number of critical policy issues/problems, and ponder questions about the legitimacy of the criminal law method of social control. Against a brief introductory background to some of the major criminal justice policies and practices, students will have the opportunity to question their effectiveness, efficiency, and fairness, and to increase their skill in being able to articulate reasoned, logical, and evidence-based grounds for their conclusions and opinions. Key questions include: How well is society doing in its efforts to prevent/control crime? How do those efforts rate in terms of securing a just balance between the rights of individuals and the coercive powers of the government? Are we doing things right? Are we doing the right things? What improvements should be made? How can we know/decide? NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ 0952.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 0853. Doing Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Justice agencies - the juvenile justice system, police, judges and juries in courts, and prisons - are expected to create justice in response to lawbreakers. These agencies, however, often operate under enormous political, cultural, social, organizational and economic pressures. Further, what citizens or local leaders sometimes want from these agencies may create challenges and temptations. Thus, just outcomes are sometimes elusive. Focusing on the period 1925-2025 and largely on Philadelphia data, students will explore conceptual frameworks in the sociology of law, research articles, movies, maps, Census data, historical documents and newspaper archives to help understand these outcomes. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ 0953.

Course Attributes: GU

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 0912. Honors Criminal Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Although we like to think differently, committing crime is an extremely common human behavior. From the extremes of armed robbery or serial murder to the ordinary failure to declare income on tax returns or the tendency to speed on the highway, nearly everyone has broken the law and committed a crime at some point. Considering physiological, psychological and pharmacological factors, we explore the influences of family, peers and the effects of alcohol and drugs on the incidence of criminal behavior. And we examine how the urban and social environment encourages (or inhibits) opportunities to commit crime. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ 0812.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GB, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 0952. Honors: Justice in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course invites students to engage in an interdisciplinary examination of one of U.S. society's most enduring conflicts - the struggle to achieve an acceptable balance between state power to prevent and control crime, and the rights of individuals to be free from undue government coercion. Within the context of the structures and processes of the criminal justice system, students will investigate a select number of critical policy issues/problems, and ponder questions about the legitimacy of the criminal law method of social control. Against a brief introductory background to some of the major criminal justice policies and practices, students will have the opportunity to question their effectiveness, efficiency, and fairness, and to increase their skill in being able to articulate reasoned, logical, and evidence-based grounds for their conclusions and opinions. Key questions include: How well is society doing in its efforts to prevent/control crime? How do those efforts rate in terms of securing a just balance between the rights of individuals and the coercive powers of the government? Are we doing things right? Are we doing the right things? What improvements should be made? How can we know/decide? (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ 0852.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GU, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 0953. Honors: Doing Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Justice agencies - the juvenile justice system, police, judges and juries in courts, and prisons - are expected to create justice in response to lawbreakers. These agencies, however, often operate under enormous political, cultural, social, organizational and economic pressures. Further, what citizens or local leaders sometimes want from these agencies may create challenges and temptations. Thus, just outcomes are sometimes elusive. Focusing on the period 1925-2025 and largely on Philadelphia data, students will explore conceptual frameworks in the sociology of law, research articles, movies, maps, Census data, historical documents and newspaper archives to help understand these outcomes. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ 0853.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GU, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 1001. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, provides an overview of a broad range of ways of understanding "criminal justice" - as an academic discipline, a philosophical construct, and, most especially, a system and process defining a large-scale enterprise characterized by a complex and fascinating array of public and private agencies, laws, rules, theories, policies, practices, technologies, problems and controversies. Emphasis is placed upon a critical understanding of the key foundations [e.g., constitutions, statutes, case law, administrative rules], components [e.g., law enforcement, courts, corrections], processes [e.g., legislation, arrest, prosecution, conviction, sentencing, correctional intervention], and goals [e.g., due process, crime prevention and control, retribution, reparation] of the criminal justice system and, to a far lesser degree, related social control mechanisms such as mental health, juvenile, and civil justice systems. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 1002. Professional Development in Criminal Justice. 1 Credit Hour.

This one-credit seminar will focus on the various traditional and non-traditional career avenues that graduates of an undergraduate program in Criminal Justice can pursue. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have developed the skills necessary to effectively search for career opportunities and communicate professionally. Students will also develop an application-ready resume and will be well-prepared for networking and professional interviews.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 1009. Discovering Criminal Justice. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of criminal justice as a major. The primary goal is to provide prospective criminal justice majors with resources and support to help them make an informed decision about pursuing a career in the field of criminal justice. NOTE: Restricted to students with less than 30 credits.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 1901. Honors Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of Criminal Justice 1001 (C050). NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2000. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics will be arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor for more information.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 2001. Introduction to Juvenile Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the juvenile justice system, including its origins, and development and contemporary calls for reform. Topics include definition of juvenile delinquency, philosophy and procedures of the juvenile justice system. Processes and policies used to control juvenile offenders, correctional treatment of juveniles, and prevention and intervention strategies will also be discussed.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2002. Victims in Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the problem of victimization - both general and criminal; the types of victims involved -- direct and indirect, and individual and collective; and the harms they sustain -- financial, physical and mental. It also examines the fairness and efficacy of a wide variety of preventive and reactive ways of dealing with it -- by society in general and by the criminal justice system in particular. Emphasis is upon data sets and research studies shedding light upon the levels, correlates, dynamics, and consequences of major forms of victimization, as a basis for critical assessment of victimization theory, as well as existing and potential laws, policies, programs, practices, and technologies for reducing its incidence and impact.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2101. Introduction to Law Enforcement. 3 Credit Hours.

Explores major trends and issues in law enforcement. The history and contemporary operation of police organizations, as well as the legal framework within which they operate. Examines police behavior and attitudes, especially as they effect discretionary decision making, and issues such as police brutality and corruption.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2201. Criminal Courts and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Comprehensive introduction to the U.S. criminal court system including the structure and administration of federal and state court systems. The course focuses on several significant stages in the criminal process, including decision to charge, pretrial release, preliminary hearings, the grand jury, jury trials, and sentencing. Examines the roles of the prosecutor, defense attorney, judge, and victim. The course contrasts the popular image with the reality of the court system.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2301. Introduction to Corrections. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of sentencing, punishment, and treatment of convicted offenders. Beginning with sentencing, the course explores the options for dealing with convicted persons, including institutional and community dispositions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2401. Nature of Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

Overview of the various theories explaining crime and deviance. Emphasis on understanding the wide range of theoretical perspectives on crime and criminals, and how these theories impact criminal justice policy and treatment of offenders.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2501. Introduction to Criminal Law. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the general principles of substantive criminal law. Topics include the American legal system and appellate process; nature, origin and purposes of criminal law; constitutional limits on criminal law; elements of crime - actus reus, mens rea, causation; and defenses to charges of crime. The course emphasizes the application of legal rules to solve hypothetical and real life legal problems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2597. Criminal Justice Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces the scientific method and research designs including qualitative field methods, survey research, experiments, and quasi-experiments. Evaluation of research quality and synthesis of research evidence related to criminal justice issues emphasized. Special attention devoted to research problems often salient when researching criminal justice topics. Students who have taken CJ 2601 will not earn additional credit for CJ 2597.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CJ 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

CJ 2601. Introduction to Criminal Justice Research. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines different research tools used to gather empirical information on criminal justice issues. Reviews benchmarks of scientific quality, and research tools like qualitative field methods, survey research, experiments, quasi-experiments, and career research. Special attention devoted to research problems often salient when researching criminal justice topics.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2602. Criminal Justice Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to basic statistical methods and their application to criminal justice data. Covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, and basic hypothesis testing. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Quantitative Reasoning B (QB) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. (Prior to spring 2017, the course title was "Criminal Justice Research and Analysis.")

Course Attributes: QB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
(CJ 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)
AND (CJ 2696|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR CJ 2597|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently)

CJ 2696. Planned Change. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to strategies and techniques of change in criminal justice. Important theories, methods of analysis, and techniques employed in changing individuals, organizations, and communities. This writing intensive course is required for the major. The course is open to criminal justice majors and minors only.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 2701. Inside-Out Prison Exchange. 3 Credit Hours.

The "Inside-Out" Prison Exchange Program is an opportunity for a small group of Temple students to go behind the walls of an area prison or jail to take a course with a comparable number of residents of the correctional facility. Using a unique pedagogical approach, approximately 15 "inside" students and 15 "outside" students (from Temple) meet for class once a week to explore issues of crime and justice, the criminal justice system, corrections and imprisonment. These topics are examined in depth, through an ongoing facilitated dialogue involving all participants, both in small groups and in the full class. There are numerous texts for the course, as well as several reflective/analytical assignments throughout the semester. Additionally, students work on a project together towards the end of the semester, developing solutions to the problems examined during the term. The course offers a chance for all participants to gain a deeper understanding of the criminal justice system through the marriage of theoretical knowledge and practical experience achieved by weekly meetings throughout the semester inside the facility.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3000. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics will be arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor for more information.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 3002. Drugs, Crime, and Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the role that drugs play in the U.S. criminal justice system. Topics covered include the history of drug prohibition in the U.S.; the types of illegal drugs currently available in the United States; patterns, trends, and scope of illicit drug use; consideration of the relationship between drugs and crime; and manifestations and consequences of the criminal justice system response. The course includes hands-on experimental learning including site visits to locations such as drug court and rehabilitation programs. Note: This course was previously known as CJ 4002 or 4902. Students who have already received credit for this topic under those numbers will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3003. Race and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the social, cultural, economic, psychological, and political factors associated with race and crime in the United States. This course examines the real and perceived relationship between race/ethnicity and criminal activity, as well as the impact of both personal and institutional racism on the criminal justice system. NOTE: This course was formerly taught as "Urban Minorities and the Criminal Justice System." Students who received credit under the prior title will not receive additional credit because the content overlaps significantly. This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. Note also that this course existed previously under the course number of CJ 4003. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3004. Women and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of historic and contemporary treatment of women involved in the criminal justice system as offenders, victims of crime, and workers and criminal justice professions. Specific topics may include criminological theories of women's crime, prostitution, infanticide, women's prisons, sexual offenses, domestic violence, and women's experience in policing, corrections, and law. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4004. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3005. Historical Roots of Urban Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

The historical development of organized crime (gambling, prostitution, narcotics, and bootlegging), professional theft, juvenile delinquency, and deviant subcultures in American cities since the Civil War. The development of criminal justice institutions, especially police, and their relationship to criminal activity. NOTE: Prior background in history or criminal justice preferred, but not required. Please also know that this course was formerly known as CJ 4005. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3006. Crime and Justice Around the World. 3 Credit Hours.

Philosophies, practices, and institutions of criminal justice in other countries. Crime & Justice Around the World was formerly known as CJ 4006 Comparative Criminal Justice. Students who have already received credit for CJ 4006 will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic as CJ 3006 Crime & Justice Around the World for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3007. Computer Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide students with an overview of computer crime, the legislative responses to computer crime, and the issues encountered by police when enforcing laws in cyberspace. Emphasis is on how communication technologies (e.g., computers and related networking technologies) can be targets of crime, instruments of crime, and important sources of criminal evidence. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4007. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3101. Police Organization and Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Historical and contemporary management practices as applied to law enforcement organizations are examined, with particular concern for assessing police management accountability. Theories of organization and management are examined with regard to the police role and the efficient and effective provision of law enforcement services to the community.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CJ 2101|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

CJ 3102. Community and Crime Prevention. 3 Credit Hours.

Course links features of community and individuals with different responses to crime and disorder, including individual and community prevention efforts. Examines causes of fear of crime, impacts of neighborhood features on reactions to crime, and types of prevention efforts mounted in different types of neighborhoods. The course emphasizes the links among individuals, community context, and psychological and behavioral reactions to disorder. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4102. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3201. The American Jury System. 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of the role of the jury within the larger context of the criminal justice system. Explores the origins of the concept of "trial by jury" in an historical and philosophical context. Analyzes obstacles to definitions and operationalization of the notion of a "trial by jury of one's peers." Discusses contribution of juries to attainment of criminal justice system goals and critiques suggestions for jury reform.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3301. Community Corrections. 3 Credit Hours.

Various dimensions of community corrections, including the effect of the community on the formation of correctional policy, as well as the numerous intermediate sanctions (community corrections) available on the continuum between probation and incarceration. Analysis of correctional policy making. Topics include probation, parole, electronic monitoring, day reporting centers, boot camps, and many other sentencing options.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3302. Prisons in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Focus on development, current state of, and issues related to the U.S. prison system. Examination of the reality of the prison experience. Analysis of the system's efficacy and strategies for prison reform. Topics include prison life and culture, correctional management, the history of incarceration, and AIDS, drugs, sexual activity, and prison privatization.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3303. Rehabilitation of the Offender. 3 Credit Hours.

Community and institutional correctional interventions are considered, examination of various treatments for certain kinds of offenders, problems in providing services in correctional settings, and research findings on the effectiveness of correctional interventions. NOTE: This course was formerly numbered CJ 2302 under the same title. Students who have earned credits for CJ 2302 will not receive additional credit for CJ 3303. Students who earned a low grade in CJ 2302 may take CJ 3303 to improve their grade point average.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3304. Capital Punishment. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the highly controversial subject of the death penalty. The history of capital punishment in America and the types of offenses to which it has been applied; arguments for and against its use; its status in current legislation; significant cases; the current death row population and the likelihood of execution; public attitudes toward capital punishment; and the moral issues it raises. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4301. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3401. White Collar Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

The nature, extent, and cost of white collar crime. Analysis of several forms of white collar (corporate and individual) crime, the relevance of law-making to lawbreaking, problems of detection and punishment and the causes of this social problem. Discussion of policy evaluation and suggested reforms.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3402. Street-Level Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces a set of crime theories that emphasize the role of the built environment in shaping human behavior and consequently where crime happens. The basic question asked in environmental criminology is why crime occurs where it does. Theoretical frameworks used to explore this question include: behavioral geography, routine activities, crime pattern theory, rational choice and human territorial functioning. In addition, various crime prevention strategies are examined such as situational crime prevention, CPTED, and defensible space. Note: This course was formerly known as "Environmental Criminology." Students who received credit under the prior title will not receive additional credit because the content overlaps significantly.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CJ 2401|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

CJ 3403. Organized Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of definitional issues and methodological problems in the study of organized crime. This course studies a variety of organized criminal activities on the local, national and international level. It explores of the origins, opportunity, motives for criminal enterprises and examines the interconnections between organized criminals and legitimate organizations. Legislative and policy responses are investigated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3404. Urban Crime Patterns. 3 Credit Hours.

The spatial variation of crime is analyzed at three levels. Cultural variables are used to explain crime in regions of the United States within which the cities are located. Economic base is used to explain variation in crime between cities. Finally, housing and income segregation are used to explain the spatial variation of crime within a city. Much of the course focuses on Philadelphia.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3405. Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Global Security. 3 Credit Hours.

Acts of terrorism can include crimes committed to disrupt governments, change political will, instigate religious furor, and impose a transformation by violent means. These actions can interrupt or damage critical infrastructure, cause fear amongst citizens and require governments to expend huge resources and efforts to marginalize the effect of terrorist acts or prevent them from occurring. This course will address the causes and consequences of terrorism and transnational crime; the interaction between terrorist groups, other criminal elements such as organized crime and other entities that provide material support to these groups; the mechanisms employed by global organizations to conduct terrorist acts; and how dealing with terrorist events has changed the global concept of security and its implications on the rule of law.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3406. Youth and Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of key issues associated with youth and crime in the United States, and the educational, social, and cultural efforts to reduce youth involvement with guns, drugs, and gangs. Emphasis will be on the nature and structure of youth gangs, drug use by juveniles, and risk factors associated with youth violence. Other issues may involve curfews, gun violence, victims of youth violence, and the over-representation of minority youth in the juvenile justice system. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4401. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3407. Violence, Crime, and Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of violence in its diverse aspects as well as collective and individual questions about its nature and causes. Of particular interest are definitions of violence: when is violence criminal, when is it political? In addition to discussion of the causes of violence, emphasis will be placed on society's response to violent acts. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4402. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3408. Psychology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

The contribution of psychology to our understanding of various aspects of, and decisions within, the criminal justice process. The psychological implications of criminal behavior, criminal justice decision-making, jury selection, witness recall, sentencing, prisonization, and correctional treatment. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4403 and CJ 4903. Students who have already received credit for this topic under those numbers will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3409. Criminal Gangs. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the modern urban street gang and specialty gangs (e.g. outlaw biker gangs, skinhead groups, etc.) by investigating the extensive history of theory and research on gangs. The first half of the course will attempt to answer such questions as: What is a gang? How does one differentiate between the different types of gang? Why do individuals join gangs? The second half of the course will focus on the law enforcement and community response to gangs with a heavy emphasis on comparing and contrasting a variety of "evidence-based" models of gang prevention and intervention.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3501. Criminal Procedure: Police Phase. 3 Credit Hours.

In depth exploration of the law of criminal procedure applicable to the police phase of the criminal process, based primarily on reading and analysis of Supreme Court opinions establishing the legal rules that govern searches and seizures, arrests, interrogation, identification procedures, investigating grand juries, and entrapment. The course includes investigation of the historical roots of the "Bill of Rights" and study of the process by which criminal procedure became constitutionalized. Emphasis is on application of legal rules to real and hypothetical situations and critical analysis of rules' impact on the criminal justice system. Note: This course was formerly known as "Criminal Procedure: Law Enforcement Practices and Procedures." Students who received credit under the prior title will not receive additional credit because the content overlaps significantly.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3502. Criminal Procedure: Prosecution & Adjudication. 3 Credit Hours.

The legal principles governing the post-investigation phase of the criminal justice process: bail, pretrial detention, arraignment, preliminary hearings, guilty pleas, right to counsel, speedy trial, double jeopardy, and the right to trial by jury, including practical impact of these rules on the criminal justice system. Law and legal issues are examined primarily through study of U.S. Supreme Court cases.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CJ 2501|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

CJ 3503. Sex Crimes and the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

An exploration of the definition and nature of sexual crimes, the experiences of victims of sexual violence, and the criminal justice system and community response to sex crime offenders. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4501. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3601. Legal Research. 0 or 2 Credit Hours.

Students will explore different areas of legal research. Topics include the introduction to the use of legal materials including federal and state sources, legislation, legal periodicals and treatises. Techniques of conducting legal research are taught through written student research projects. NOTE: Enrollment through special permission.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CJ 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR CJ 1901|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

CJ 3701. Land Management and Federal Law Enforcement. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a broad introduction to the history, operation and governing laws of the United States Public Lands System as well as a more detailed examination of several federal government agencies with law enforcement divisions, namely, the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), that are responsible for providing visitor and resource protection in areas that are or have been owned or administered by the federal government. Several themes underpinning the course include: the discretionary prerogatives of law enforcement branches of land management agencies, the scope of federal and state authority and jurisdiction on public lands and their regulating mechanisms (i.e., law/policy, markets, norms, architecture), the significance of enabling legislation for the stewardship of cultural, natural and historical resources, and the issues and challenges inherent in the protection, conservation and preservation of vast public lands and resources.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3901. Honors Issues in Criminal Procedure. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this class will get a "taste of law school" while studying the constitutional law that governs the police phase of the criminal process. Students will learn what police can and cannot do when they initiate an encounter with a citizen, search the citizen's person or property, and seek to obtain a confession. The rules that have developed are the result of a constant tension between safeguarding our personal liberty and protecting public safety. By exploring the impact of these rules on real and hypothetical situations, students will critically analyze and debate the balance that the Supreme Court has established in this on-going conflict. Students will also learn about the Supreme Court; the historical roots of the Bill or Rights and the process by which the law of criminal procedure became constitutionalized; and how to find, read, and analyze U.S. Supreme Court decisions.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3902. Honors: Environmental Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces a set of crime theories that emphasize the role of the built environment in shaping human behavior and consequently where crime happens. The basic question asked in environmental criminology is why crime occurs where it does. Theoretical frameworks used to explore this question include: behavioral geography, routine activities, crime pattern theory, rational choice and human territorial functioning. In addition, various crime prevention strategies are examined such as situational crime prevention, CPTED, and defensible space.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3903. Honors: Psychology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

The contribution of psychology to our understanding of various aspects of, and decisions within, the criminal justice process. The psychological implications of criminal behavior, criminal justice decision-making, jury selection, witness recall, sentencing, prisonization, and correctional treatment. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4403 and CJ 4903. Students who have already received credit for this topic under those numbers will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 3904. Honors: Drugs, Crime, and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the role that drugs play in the U.S. criminal justice system. Topics covered include the history of drug prohibition in the U.S.; the types of illegal drugs currently available in the United States; patterns, trends, and scope of illicit drug use; consideration of the relationship between drugs and crime; and manifestations and consequences of the criminal justice system response. The course includes hands-on experimental learning including site visits to locations such as drug court and rehabilitation programs. Note: This course was previously known as CJ 4002 and CJ 4902. Students who have already received credit for this topic under those numbers will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 4000. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics will be arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor for more information.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 4001. Crime and Social Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the social policy implications of various perspectives on crime. Through an analysis of different criminal justice policies, reforms and recommendations, it examines the assumptions of political authorities and government decision-makers about the nature of disorder, crime and criminals in contemporary society. Policies in areas such as drugs, sexual offending, domestic violence, and child abuse will be analyzed. While this course centers on policies in the United States, it will offer a comparative perspective by discussing policy responses from other countries.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 4075. Criminal Justice Internship Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Mandatory weekly seminar to be taken in conjunction with field service internship with law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies, rehabilitation and prevention programs, and community organizations dealing with the crime problem. Students who have earned credits for CJ Internship Seminar (CJ 4077) will not be permitted to earn additional credits in CJ 4075. Must be taken with CJ 4085.

Co-requisites: CJ 4085.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 4082. Independent Study. 3 Credit Hours.

For students wishing to engage in intensive study of a specific topic in consultation with a faculty member. Not intended to be a substitute for any required course. The student and faculty member must enter into an agreement regarding the content and requirements, including readings, meetings, and papers. NOTE: The agreement must be filed in the department office before the end of the first two weeks of the semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 4085. Criminal Justice Internship. 3 to 9 Credit Hours.

Field Service Training is provided with law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies, rehabilitation and prevention programs, and community organizations dealing with the crime problem. Allows a student to clarify career interests, synthesize prior knowledge from the classroom with direct experience, critically examine the criminal justice system in operation, and sharpen analytic and observational skills. NOTE: Students may register for 3 credits (10 hours per week), 6 credits (20 hours per week), or 9 credits (30 hours per week). NOTE: Enrollment requires permission from the Instructor. Students who have earned credits for CJ Practicum (CJ 4087) will not be permitted to earn additional credits in CJ 4085. Must be taken with CJ 4075.

Co-requisites: CJ 4075.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 4096. Writing Seminar: Crime and Social Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This writing intensive course explores the social policy implications of various perspectives on crime. Through an analysis of different criminal justice policies, reforms and recommendations, it examines the assumptions of political authorities and government decision-makers about the nature of disorder, crime and criminals in contemporary society. Policies in areas such as drugs, sexual offending, domestic violence, and child abuse will be analyzed. While this course centers on policies in the United States, it will offer a comparative perspective by discussing policy responses from other countries.

Field of Study Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of study: Criminal Justice.
Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CJ 2602|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

CJ 4098. Writing Seminar: Gender and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

In this Writing Intensive course, students will explore the historic and contemporary treatment of women involved in the criminal justice system as offenders, victims of crime, and workers in criminal justice related professions. Specific topics include: feminist and other criminological theories regarding women's crime, prostitution, infanticide, women's prisons, sexual offenses, domestic violence, and women's experience working in policing, corrections, and law.

Field of Study Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of study: Criminal Justice.
Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CJ 2602|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

CJ 4101. Critical Issues in Law Enforcement. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines trends and issues in policing and their philosophical and operational implications. It discusses the challenges involved with managing complex threats to security such as cybercrime and organized crime. Other topics include measuring effectiveness in policing; community and problem oriented policing; intelligence-led policing; corruption; use of force; women and policing; and policing ethnic minority communities. Developments in private policing are also examined. While this course focuses on issues in the United States, it will situate trends in a global context and offer examples from different parts of the world.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 4196. Writing Seminar: Critical Issues in Law Enforcement. 3 Credit Hours.

This writing intensive course examines trends and issues in policing and their philosophical and operational implications. It discusses the challenges involved with managing complex threats to security such as cybercrime and organized crime. Other topics include measuring effectiveness in policing; community and problem oriented policing; intelligence-led policing; corruption; use of force; women and policing; and policing ethnic minority communities. Developments in private policing are also examined. While this course focuses on issues in the United States, it will situate trends in a global context and offer examples from different parts of the world.

Field of Study Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of study: Criminal Justice.
Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
CJ 2602|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

CJ 4901. Honors Reform Strategies in Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course engages students in critical analysis of the criminal justice system and of significant innovations and proposals for reform of policies, programs and practices. Specific topics, teaching methods and materials vary by semester. The course typically runs as an Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program class in which a marriage of theoretical knowledge with practical understanding and experience is achieved by holding class inside an area prison or jail throughout the semester. Involving roughly equal numbers of Temple students and incarcerated students, these classes utilize a variety of active learning techniques and lead to production of class projects by the end of the course.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 4911. Honors Crime and Social Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the social policy implications of various perspectives on crime. Through an analysis of different criminal justice policies, reforms and recommendations, it examines the assumptions of political authorities and government decision-makers about the nature of disorder, crime and criminals in contemporary society. Policies in areas such as drugs, sexual offending, domestic violence, and child abuse will be analyzed. While this course centers on policies in the United States, it will offer a comparative perspective by discussing policy responses from other countries.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 4941. Honors Youth and Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of key issues associated with youth and crime in the United States, and the educational, social, and cultural efforts to reduce youth involvement with guns, drugs, and gangs. Emphasis will be on the nature and structure of youth gangs, drug use by juveniles, and risk factors associated with youth violence. Other issues may include curfews, gun violence, victims of youth violence, and the over-representation of minority youth in the juvenile justice system.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 5001. Evidence-Based Policing. 3 Credit Hours.

The aim of this course is to introduce police professionals to the growing body of research and knowledge about their job, and develop a desire to merge evidence-based practice into their professional life. Evidence-based practice is about making decisions through the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the best available evidence from multiple sources by asking an answerable question, acquiring evidence, critically appraising the trustworthiness and relevance of the evidence, aggregating the evidence together, applying the evidence into the decision-making process, and assessing the outcome. The course is also designed to help practitioners understand what is necessary to develop their own evidence about work practices. On successful completion of the course, students will be able to contrast the evidence-based approach to opinion, expertise and experience; summarize influential studies in policing; and systematically gather, collate, assess and weigh evidence on a topic from various sources.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 5011. Influencing Decision-Makers. 3 Credit Hours.

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the role of analysis in policing, crime prevention, and criminal investigation. The course provides an overview of intelligence-led policing, criminal intelligence, the intelligence cycle, the 3-i model, strategies for developing analytical capacity, tactical and strategic crime prevention planning, and techniques for intelligence and analytical product dissemination. The course will also introduce analysts to analytical techniques used by intelligence officers.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 5012. Crime Science Tools and Techniques. 3 Credit Hours.

The aim of this course is to provide a structure and framework for the development of skills in crime science, and the evaluation of crime prevention strategies. Course components will include structuring projects for evaluation, the appreciation of crime prevention mechanisms, data preparation, process and outcome evaluation, time series analysis, and the use of spatio-temporal techniques such as the weighted displacement quotient. On successful completion, students will be able to set up crime prevention projects, monitor ongoing implementation, and assess any crime reduction outcomes.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 5021. Ethical Governance. 3 Credit Hours.

Ethical governance refers to organizational practices designed to achieve value-driven policing across the ranks. It strives to align everyday policing operations (both internally and externally) with enduring democratic values, including policing by consent, access to justice, equality, equity and respect for human rights. In a democratic society, such values must be sustained both within police organizations as well as externally, through relationships with citizens. Police leaders, policy-makers and scholars are looking afresh at mechanisms for enhancing ethical governance, particularly in light of recent threats to police legitimacy. In order to balance evidence-based policing with core organizational values, police leaders must cultivate and develop officers that perform with the highest levels of community commitment, integrity, and innovation. This course canvasses important concepts, debates, visions and practices in ethical governance, providing students with the tools to critically examine challenges and opportunities in their own organizational environments. The aim of this course is to identify and critically examine the ethical dimensions of leadership in a democratic society, and to explore ways of aligning police operations and administration with enduring organizational values.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 5022. Developmental Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will help graduate policing students develop an appreciation for formal and informal leadership roles and how best to influence differing groups of followers. In light of increasing public and media scrutiny of police interactions with minority group members, understanding leadership in tense or in extremis situations is invaluable. Understanding detractors from effective leadership such as bias and the potential for dehumanization are important to understanding the common reactions when in the role of police officer. Students will consider the need for flexibility across the various environments and activities encountered by police.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 5023. Seminar in Executive Management. 3 Credit Hours.

The aim of this executive seminar program is to ask students to reflect on their core values, and those of their agency and to think more critically about how these interact with the competing core values of other branches of city government, other police departments and aspects of the judicial system, and stakeholders from outside of government, such as private industry, the media, community and protest groups. In a seminar setting alongside the course instructor as moderator and an invited guest, each week provides an opportunity to meet leaders from outside of policing, identify areas of common ground, and cultivate a deeper, more critical understanding of the student's role leading one of the major arms of government. Students will emerge with a clearer sense of their role in directing and forming the vision, culture and ethos of their organization.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8001. The American Criminal Justice System. 3 Credit Hours.

A broad, survey course designed for students beginning graduate studies in criminal justice who lack background in the field or who seek to investigate the latest theoretical, programmatic, and policy issues. The class familiarizes students with historical milestones and shifts in criminal justice philosophy and practice. It reviews the operations of criminal justice agencies and assesses current practices in light of evidence on outcomes and other consequences. The course explores the significance of race, class, and gender in criminal justice processing, agencies and programs. Students have the opportunity to learn and apply a range of methods and theoretical perspectives in analyzing and critiquing selected justice system practices and reform measures.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8101. Decision Making in Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Core Course. Conceptualizes criminal justice as a series of interrelated decision stages. Examines organizational, legal and research issues related to each decision stage.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8102. Research Methods in Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Core course. Assumes prior familiarity with basic methodology and statistics. Prepares students to conduct criminal justice research and evaluation. Covers topics of causality, reliability, validity, and quasi-experimental methods.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8104. Law and Social Order. 3 Credit Hours.

Core Course. Examines moral, practical, legal, and constitutional limitations of law as a means of securing social order. Classes and readings are designed to promote critical analysis of primary (constitutions, statutes, cases) and secondary (legal, philosophical, social science literature) sources of law, with special focus on the role of the Supreme Court in balancing state vs. individual interests and on rules and standards by which the Court's discretion and decision-making can be assessed.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8105. Statistical Issues and Analysis of Criminal Justice Data. 3 Credit Hours.

Core Course. Introduces criminal justice graduate students to simple and multiple regression analyses in criminal justice research. Extended treatment of the detection of non-normal data through the use of graphical and statistical techniques, and the statistical implications of highly non-normal data that are encountered in many areas of criminal justice. Clarifies relations between statistical assumptions, results, and use of results for decision making purposes.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8106. Theories of Crime and Deviance. 3 Credit Hours.

Core Course. The goal of the course is to provide an appraisal of the foundations for understanding criminal behavior. Students read major current and classic works couched at different levels of analyses about the origins of criminal behavior including not only violent and property crime but also delinquency, white collar crime and regulatory violations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8201. Court Processes and Administration. 3 Credit Hours.

Focuses on historical development, structure and processes of the American criminal court system. Identifies key decision points in the criminal process (pretrial, charge, plea negotiations, sentencing etc.) and examines their impact on the work of the court. Studies the role of key figures (prosecutor, judge, defense attorney, defendant and victim) in contemporary court setting. All discussions set within broad context of the inevitable conflict between personal liberty and community safety, and the contrasting goals of the "formal" criminal justice system versus the "informal" courtroom workgroup.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8202. Corrections. 3 Credit Hours.

Analyzes the theory, practices and policies of the American correctional system, covering the nature and administration of both institutional and community sanctions and agencies. Students explore competing penal theories and review evidence on the effectiveness of correctional practices. The course investigates the historical development and evolution of imprisonment, trends in the use of confinement, and the effects of incarceration on offenders, families and communities. Students analyze the characteristics of correctional populations and debate the causes and implications of race, class and gender differences. The course identifies significant current issues and reviews the ethical, legal and practical dimensions of proposals for reform. Note: Prior to fall 2016, the course title was "Correctional Philosophy and Administration."

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8203. Issues in Law Enforcement. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on conceptual models of policing and how they affect operational priorities and resource decisions in law enforcement. Topics include community policing, problem-oriented policing and intelligence-led policing, among others. This is a wide-ranging course that explores policing from an international perspective and through the lens of the varying contentious issues of the day.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8204. Policy and Practice in Juvenile Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to increase the student's understanding of the purposes, structure and processes of this distinctly American invention, the juvenile justice system. Together, we explore its recent development and current policy initiatives that are reshaping its role in our society. We also look at the target of this system: delinquent kids. We examine the juvenile justice system in terms of its underlying aims, its historical foundations, and its sociopolitical contexts, explanations of delinquency, theories of child development, case law, legislation, changes now occurring with respect to its goals, and recent initiatives to increase dependency on scientific evidence of effectiveness. In doing so, we seek to understand the system's limitations, contradictions and strengths. At the same time, we examine the role that research plays in shaping the policies and programs that constitute this system.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8205. Aggression and Violence. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will learn about different types of violence in the United States, including homicide, assault, robbery, family violence, youth violence, drug related violence, and gun- related violence. A three-part, interdisciplinary perspective guides this inquiry: (1) examination of patterns and trends, (2) examination of correlates and causes, including biological, psychological and sociological theories, and (3) investigation of different policy responses to violence. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to do two things: (1) critically discuss major explanations that have been offered for different kinds of violent behavior, and (2) critically evaluate policies for preventing and controlling specific types of violence.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8221. Qualitative Approaches to Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to different paradigms, approaches and skills that constitute part of a very broad field of qualitative research. This course is designed to be highly interactive. All members of the class will play an active role in leading discussions, sharing knowledge and experiences, and voicing concerns and questions. Students will conduct exercises for "stretching" their skills of observation, interviewing, and data analysis, as well as gain experience in reviewing and critiquing published research. Finally, we will examine some of the more complex issues surrounding the ethics of research with human subjects.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8222. Simulation Modeling. 3 Credit Hours.

Social organization involves complicated systems, such as organizations, institutions and families - and their component parts. The components of systems frequently interact in a complex fashion. Simulation models offer a useful approach to understanding this complexity. Simulation models allow for the creation of theoretically informed representations of complex dynamic systems. These representations can be used to conduct virtual experiments with the goal of strengthening theories and developing better designs for empirical research. The course covers different types of simulation modeling, but focuses on applications of Agent-Based Modeling. Students will gain experience developing conceptual models and programming simple simulation models.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8223. Risk, Prediction and Classification. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on issues surrounding prediction and classification in criminal justice. We examine different perspectives on risk and danger, risk assessment models, the possibilities of accurate predictions, and the implications (practical, social, ethical) of prediction and classification in criminal justice. These include career criminal models and their repercussions in criminal justice policy, the role of risk assessment instruments in community corrections, inmate classification and release, and others. In addition to these practical applications, we will consider the implications of the increasing salience of the notion of "risk" in public and policy discourse.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8224. Drugs, Crime and Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This advanced graduate course considers the problems of drug abuse, crime and the justice system's response to drug-related crime. A multidisciplinary perspective is used to analytically and critically explore these issues from social, legal, political, public health, enforcement, and criminological perspectives. Specific topics covered include theoretical explanations for drug abuse, drug legalization and decriminalization, drugs and violence, treatment alternatives to incarceration, public health effects, and mandatory sentencing laws for drug offenders. Readings, papers, and in-class discussions and formal debates are used to further students' understanding of the connections between drug abuse and crime, effective criminal justice responses to drug-related crime, and drug policies.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8225. Rehabilitation, Reentry and Recidivism. 3 Credit Hours.

Numerous prison- and community-based approaches have been developed in recent years to help ex-offenders successfully reintegrate into the community. Promising in-prison approaches include comprehensive risk/needs assessment, drug treatment, cognitive behavioral treatment, vocational and basic education, prison industries, and prerelease planning. Community-based approaches include a wide range of options that provide reintegration assistance and linkages to community social services. In this class, we examine theoretical models of rehabilitation (e.g., principles of effective correctional intervention) and recidivism (e.g., life course and reintegration perspectives), including related research, and we investigate current re-entry initiatives at the national, state, and local levels.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8226. Transnational and Global Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

Global criminology is an emerging field covering international and transnational crimes that have not traditionally been the focus of mainstream criminology or criminal justice. This course will examine the diverse dimensions of global and transnational crime. Students will examine and discuss historical and contemporary patterns, modus operandi, capabilities, and vulnerabilities of global and transnational criminals and organizations. Course content includes an introduction to global and transnational crime, a discussion of the "problem" of global and transnational crime, a review of illicit activities of criminal organizations, an examination of the link between transnational crime and harms, and a review of contemporary approaches to combating global and transnational crime. The seminar will include a review of organized crime, corporate crime, cybercrime, and terrorism and war in Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Asia, Africa and The Americas.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8227. Contemporary Issues in Youth Crime: Gangs. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the modern urban street gang by investigating the extensive history of theory and research on street gangs. The first half of the course will attempt to answer such questions as: Why do youth and young adults join gangs? Why do they leave? Are street gangs similar to other deviant groups, delinquent networks and/or pro-social groups such as fraternities? The second half of the course will focus on the community response to gangs with a heavy emphasis on comparing and contrasting a variety of "evidence-based" models of gang prevention and intervention. By the end of the semester students will have an in-depth understanding of why the problems of gangs and gang violence remain so intractable today, and will be able to identify a number of areas where theory, research and practice have failed to connect.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8228. Race, Crime, and Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

The strong connection between race and crime in the United States occupies the discourse of media, policy-makers, and scholars, alike. This course considers the examination of race as a central concern for scholars of criminal justice especially in an era of mass incarceration. Specifically, we engage in the following questions: How large are racial and ethnic differences in criminal involvement? How do we theoretically construct and measure race and how do these measurements impact how we understand racial categories and crime? What are the implications of these "facts" on the popular understanding of the race-crime connection? What role do criminal justice apparatuses (police, courts, jails, for instance) play in reproducing and amplifying ideas about race and crime? Using various interdisciplinary theoretical approaches, we examine the complex ways in which race-crime-criminal justice is both a product of societal forces and an "engine" reproducing racial arrangements and power relationships in society.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8231. Environmental Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

By land, by sea, and by air, communities across America confront environmental problems, many of these arising from the commission of environmental crimes, and in response to which citizens and communities seek environmental justice. This course addresses structural issues in environmental justice and environmental crimes, environmental victimization, and the role of compliance in resolving issues of environmental justice.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8232. Crime Mapping. 3 Credit Hours.

Spatial distribution of crime and criminals is examined in relation to the geographic processes that influence this distribution. This course involves half seminar and half lab work. Seminars include the structure of geographic information and spatial analysis techniques, alongside spatial theories of crime and how these theories can explain crime patterns. Lab work instructs students in the use of GIS to map and analyze crime events, from the national level down to the city level. The GIS and crime mapping component assumes no prior knowledge of GIS, uses the latest ArcGIS software, and concentrates on crime in the City of Philadelphia. Note: Prior to fall 2016, the course title was "Geographical Perspectives of Crime."

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8233. Communities and Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the connections between features of community, and crime, fear and disorder, at various levels of analysis ranging from the community to the street block. It covers varying theoretical perspectives on these connections, with the aim of educating students in the relative strengths and weakness of these various perspectives. Students learn to apply these various perspectives and tools to case studies and actual locations.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8234. Criminal Victimization and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the problem of victimization [general vs. criminal], the types of victims [direct vs. indirect; individual vs. collective, etc.], and the harms involved [financial vs. physical vs. mental]. It also examines the fairness and efficacy of a wide variety of preventive, remedial, extra-legal and legal [civil, criminal] responses by society and by the criminal justice system. Emphasis is upon data sets and research studies shedding light upon the levels, correlates, dynamics, and consequences of major forms of victimization, as a basis for critical analysis of victimization theory and existing and potential laws, policies, programs, practices, and technologies for reducing its incidence and impact.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8235. Criminal Justice Organization: Structure, Process and Change. 3 Credit Hours.

Criminal justice organizations are public bureaucracies; they aren't typically worried about a financial bottom line. Their aims have to do with public safety, controlling criminals, and managing large populations of incarcerated individuals. The criminal justice system comprises a complex network of agencies and organizations that often pursue very different goals. Consequently, one reality of these organizations that we need to explore is how they work together to achieve common goals. We examine both criminal justice systems and criminal justice organizations from both structural and a behavioral perspectives. Our main purpose is to understand how they work so that we can, when it is desirable, change them, the way the relate to each other, and the way they relate to the larger society. We emphasize the manner in which criminal justice systems and their environments are changing, and the importance of capitalizing on those changes. Leadership and entrepreneurial thinking will be emphasized as well as structural approaches that foster development.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8236. Organized Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8237. Program Planning and Evaluation in Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Program evaluation is the systematic acquisition and assessment of information to provide useful feedback about a program. In other words, program evaluation facilitates improvements in program performance and outcomes. Evaluation also enables policy makers and funding agencies make decisions about continued support of a program or program replication. Students in this course will develop the capacity to develop and produce useful feedback. They will gain a thorough knowledge of the methods of program evaluation, from the point of framing the goals of the evaluation to communicating findings. Topics will include: assessing the evaluability of the program, logic models and theories of change, formative and summative evaluations, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, data sources and data collection, analyzing and interpreting data, reporting findings, the utilization of results, and synthesizing findings across evaluation studies.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8302. Advanced Methods and Issues in Criminal Justice Research. 3 Credit Hours.

Course involves students in hands-on activities allowing them to learn how to conduct and evaluate different types of research approaches commonly used in criminal justice. Course assumes a solid grounding in graduate-level research methods, and strong multivariate quantitative skills. These "learning by doing" activities, ideally organized around a single topic and conducted for a specific client, are complemented by high level discussions of and readings about key ongoing philosophical, pragmatic, and policy related research issues, and how those issues apply to and play out in the fields of criminal justice and criminology.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8305. Advanced Statistical Issues in Criminal Justice Data. 3 Credit Hours.

Focuses on multivariate statistical techniques particularly important in criminal justice research questions. Course may cover multilevel modeling, or other techniques important to the discipline such as time series, clustering, and automatic interaction detection.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ 8310. Special Topics Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics in criminal justice research are examined. Special topics courses are developed to cover emerging issues or specialized content and they do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 8320. Seminar in Criminal Justice Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topics in current criminal justice policy are explored. Special topics courses are developed to cover emerging issues or specialized content and they do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 8330. Seminar - Advanced Research Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced topics in criminal justice and criminological research are explored.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 9082. Independent Study. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

Permits individualized study of a specific topic in consultation with a faculty member. Not intended as a substitute for any required course.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 9083. Directed Readings. 1 to 9 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 9982. Research Seminar in Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Fulfills part of the research requirements for the student working toward completion of the Ph.D. Involves advanced reading and research in areas agreed upon by the Ph.D. student and professor. Includes group and individual meetings. Aim is an advanced research paper by the student that may focus in an area related to the proposed doctoral research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 9991. Directed Research. 1 to 9 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 9994. Preliminary Examination Preparation. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 9996. Thesis Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 9998. Pre-Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Registration required each semester after Preliminary Examinations while researching the dissertation proposal.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ 9999. Doctoral Dissertation Research. 1 to 6 Credit Hour.

Restricted to students who have passed the Preliminary exams and filed an approved proposal with the Graduate School.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.
Student Attribute Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: Dissertation Writing Student.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.